courtesy

Definitions

  • Some Jamestown houses had leaded glazed wrought-iron window casements similar to the ones shown here. (Courtesy, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York.)
    Some Jamestown houses had leaded glazed wrought-iron window casements similar to the ones shown here. (Courtesy, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York.)
  • WordNet 3.6
    • n courtesy a courteous or respectful or considerate act
    • n courtesy a courteous manner
    • n courtesy a courteous or respectful or considerate remark
    • ***
Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
    • Courtesy An act of civility or respect; an act of kindness or favor performed with politeness. "My lord, for your many courtesies I thank you."
    • n Courtesy An act of civility, respect, or reverence, made by women, consisting of a slight depression or dropping of the body, with bending of the knees. "The lady drops a courtesy in token of obedience, and the ceremony proceeds as usual."
    • Courtesy Favor or indulgence, as distinguished from right; as, a title given one by courtesy .
    • Courtesy Politeness; civility; urbanity; courtliness. "And trust thy honest-offered courtesy ,
      With oft is sooner found in lowly sheds,
      With smoky rafters, than in tapestry walls
      And courts of princes, where it first was named,
      And yet is most pretended."
      "Pardon me, Messer Claudio, if once more
      I use the ancient courtesies of speech."
    • v. i Courtesy To make a respectful salutation or movement of respect; esp. (with reference to women), to bow the body slightly, with bending of the knes.
    • v. t Courtesy To treat with civility.
    • ***
Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
    • n courtesy Courtliness or elegance of manners; politeness; civility; complaisance; especially, politeness springing from kindly feeling.
    • n courtesy An act of civility or respect; an act of kindness, or a favor done with politeness; a gracious attention.
    • n courtesy A gesture of reverence, respect, or civility: formerly used for both sexes; now, in a restricted sense, a kind of obeisance made by a woman, consisting in a sinking or inclination of the body with bending of the knees: in this sense now usually pronounced and often written curtsy (kėrt′ si), Scotch also curchie.
    • n courtesy Favor; indulgence; allowance; common consent; conventional as distinguished from legal right: as, a title by courtesy; the courtesy of England. See phrases below.
    • n courtesy The custom of confirming the nomination to an office by the President of a member or former member of the Senate without the usual reference to a committee.
    • courtesy To make a gesture of reverence, respect, or civility; make a courtesy: now said only of women.
    • courtesy To treat with courtesy or civility.
    • n courtesy Naval, the interchange of official visits and salutes when a war-ship enters a foreign port.
    • ***
Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • n Courtesy kort′e-si or kurt′e-si courtliness: elegance of manner: an act of civility or respect: a curtsy:
    • v.i Courtesy to make a curtsy
    • pr.p Courtesy court′esying; pa.p. court′esied
    • n Courtesy kort′e-si or kurt′e-si, courtliness: elegance of manner: an act of civility or respect: a curtsy:
    • n Courtesy kort′e-si or kurt′e-si (law) the life interest which the surviving husband has in the real or heritable estate of his wife
    • ***

Quotations

  • W. C. Fields
    W.%20C.%20Fields
    “It was a woman who drove me to drink, and I never had the courtesy to thank her for it.”
  • St. Basil
    St. Basil
    “He who sows courtesy reaps friendship, and he who plants kindness gathers love.”
  • Christian Nevell Bovee
    Christian%20Nevell%20Bovee
    “The small courtesies sweeten life; the greater ennoble it.”
  • Ralph Waldo Emerson
    Ralph%20Waldo%20Emerson
    “Life is short, but there is always time for courtesy.”
  • Ralph Waldo Emerson
    Ralph%20Waldo%20Emerson
    “Courtesy Life be not so short but that there is always time for courtesy.”
  • Thomas Fuller
    Thomas%20Fuller
    “All doors open to courtesy.”

Etymology

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
OE. cortaisie, corteisie, courtesie, OF. curteisie, cortoisie, OF. curteisie, cortoisie, F. courtoisie, fr. curteis, corteis,. See Courteous
Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
O. Fr. courtoisie.

Usage

In literature:

Wuerben bowed to the ground, and Wilhelmine and Madame de Ruth bent in grand courtesies.
"A German Pompadour" by Marie Hay
To the courtesy of its present possessor, the Rev.
"The Life of Charles Dickens, Vol. I-III, Complete" by John Forster
Courtesy is cumbersome to him that kens it na.
"The Proverbs of Scotland" by Alexander Hislop
His courtesy and self-control struck her with surprise and admiration.
"The Clansman" by Thomas Dixon
The woman smiled, not at all affronted by the lack of courtesy shown her.
"Elizabeth Hobart at Exeter Hall" by Jean K. Baird
As a matter of fact, military courtesy is just simply an application of common, every-day courtesy and common sense.
"Manual of Military Training" by James A. Moss
She courtesied reverently, and retired.
"The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 18, No. 109, November, 1866" by Various
Had Helen Loraine been in school, the courtesy would have been hers to fulfill.
"Hester's Counterpart" by Jean K. Baird
Photo courtesy Gonville and Caius College, Cambridge University.
"Kinematics of Mechanisms from the Time of Watt" by Eugene S. Ferguson
She dropped him a courtesy, then took the glass of sherry that the steward brought and sipped it, meditative eyes on the blazing logs.
"A Young Man in a Hurry" by Robert W. Chambers
But the graceful courtesy of the French officials smoothed away every difficulty.
"A Wayfarer in China" by Elizabeth Kendall
He only lived for three days after this, but was treated with the greatest courtesy and kindness by the Spaniards.
"The Red True Story Book" by Various
When his sisters arrived, Amzi rose with the nice courtesy that lay in him and placed chairs for them about the table.
"Otherwise Phyllis" by Meredith Nicholson
And this was how they repaid her courtesy.
"The Saracen: The Holy War" by Robert Shea
The custom of a courtesy by the lady has scarcely taken root in this country.
"Social Life" by Maud C. Cooke
Erlito stood swinging his racquet lightly in his fingers, and looked into his visitor's face with pleasant and deferential courtesy.
"The Traitors" by E. Phillips (Edward Phillips) Oppenheim
That's my way of dealing with royal flunkeys, no matter what their title of courtesy.
"Secret Memoirs: The Story of Louise, Crown Princess" by Henry W. Fischer
Anne and Lydia had paid him only an absent-minded courtesy.
"The Prisoner" by Alice Brown
Massasoit received him with dignity, yet with courtesy.
"King Philip" by John S. C. (John Stevens Cabot) Abbott
As each little girl reached the door, she stopped, turned around and made a courtesy to Miss Chapman who was sitting opposite the door.
"Ruby at School" by Minnie E. Paull
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In poetry:

"Thereof no force," said Rob-in,
"For courtesy can he none.
How man-y men," said Rob-in,
"Had this monk, John?"
"Robin Hood" by Henry Morley
She kept her line of rectitude
With love's unconscious ease;
Her kindly instincts understood
All gentle courtesies.
"The Friend’s Burial" by John Greenleaf Whittier
Yet still, in gay and careless ease,
To harvest-field or dance
He brought the gentle courtesies,
The nameless grace of France.
"The Countess" by John Greenleaf Whittier
He begged her rise and tend the guest,
Who tired before the fire lay,
To do the honors of their home,
And every courtesy to pay.
"Gamzrdeli" by Akaki Tsereteli
Magnificence and grace,
Excellent courtesy:
A brightness on the face,
Airs of high memory:
Whence came all these, to such as he?
"A Friend" by Lionel Pigot Johnson
The first was of St. Gabriel;
On Wings a-flame from Heaven he fell;
And as he went upon one knee
He shone with Heavenly Courtesy.
"Courtesy" by Hilaire Belloc

In news:

Courtesy photo Chile verde burrito at Totem's.
Photo courtesy of Jennifer Marinelli Photography of Red Bluff.
COURTESY OF JOHN B BARRIOIS Donna Duplantier and Rus Blackwell get to know each other on the stoop of her duplex in John Biguent's 'Shotgun,' which is set just a few months after Hurricane Katrina.
Courtesy of Karen Boerner A photo of authorities in the backyard of a Doylestown home two houses away from where an off-duty N.J. Police officer has barricaded himself inside and is shooting at police.
Donald Kerner, photo courtesy Portsmouth Police.
View full size Courtesy photo Garret Ross scored two goals in the Spirit's 8-5 loss to Barrie .
Dorthy Fix, one of the bands playing at this weekend's Barter Fest in Hewitt, Minn. (Image courtesy of Abandoned Scout Camp).
Courtesy of ToppsLook who's watching.
Photograph courtesy of the NBA.
As Aired On May 9, 2012 Recipe Courtesy Chef Bryan Woolley.
PHOTO COURTESY OF ELLEN POPPE.
Screenshot courtesy of Square Enix.
Screenshot courtesy of Ybor Resort and Spa.
Photo courtesy of Kussmaul Electronics.
Photo courtesy of Linda Beeman.
***

In science:

Jacoby et al. (2001), image courtesy of G. H.
The Origin and Shaping of Planetary Nebulae: Putting the Binary Hypothesis to the Test
For the Sun, we computed the photospheric correction using a solar– photosphere synthetic spectrum (courtesy of P.
The discontinuous nature of chromospheric activity evolution
The jet mass after trimming appears similar to the jet mass with underlying event turned off. (Figure courtesy of D.
THE TOOLS AND MONTE CARLO WORKING GROUP Summary Report from the Les Houches 2009 Workshop on TeV Colliders
Picture of the Nautilus detector (open) (courtesy of the ROG collaboration).
The Past, Present and Future of the Resonant-Mass Gravitational Wave Detectors
FIG. 7: Interpretation of the measured capture and fusion excitation functions by description of evaporation residue cross sections. (Courtesy of H.
Fusion11 Conference Summary
The inset is the reduced (scaled) cross sections. (Courtesy of A.
Fusion11 Conference Summary
The data is well explained without need for accounting for J π distributions. (Courtesy of B.
Fusion11 Conference Summary
Right: in contrast, measurement of the large angles allows determination of the absolute parallax π1 = (A − B )/2, independent of the distance to the reference star (courtesy Lennart Lindegren).
Hipparcos: a Retrospective
Hipparcos provided not only the most accurate stellar positions, but also the largest improvement factor ever achieved (courtesy Erik Høg).
Hipparcos: a Retrospective
These figures are by courtesy of Marek and the coauthors [128].
Multiple physical elements to determine the gravitational-wave signatures of core-collapse supernovae
These figures are by courtesy of Yakunin and the coauthors .
Multiple physical elements to determine the gravitational-wave signatures of core-collapse supernovae
These figures are by courtesy of Suwa and th e coauthors [142].
Multiple physical elements to determine the gravitational-wave signatures of core-collapse supernovae
These figures are by courtesy of Oberga ulinger and the coauthors.
Multiple physical elements to determine the gravitational-wave signatures of core-collapse supernovae
These figure s are by courtesy of Shibata and the coauthors.
Multiple physical elements to determine the gravitational-wave signatures of core-collapse supernovae
This plot is by courtesy of Ott and the coauthors.
Multiple physical elements to determine the gravitational-wave signatures of core-collapse supernovae
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