countersink

Definitions

  • Plug-Cutter.  Center-Bit.  Foerstner Auger-Bit.  Expansive-Bit.  Reamer.  Rose Countersink
    Plug-Cutter. Center-Bit. Foerstner Auger-Bit. Expansive-Bit. Reamer. Rose Countersink
  • WordNet 3.6
    • v countersink insert (a nail or screw below the surface, as into a countersink)
    • n countersink a bit for enlarging the upper part of a hole
    • n countersink a hole (usually in wood) with the top part enlarged so that a screw or bolt will fit into it and lie below the surface
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Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
    • Countersink A drill or cutting tool for countersinking holes.
    • Countersink An enlargement of the upper part of a hole, forming a cavity or depression for receiving the head of a screw or bolt.
    • Countersink To cause to sink even with or below the surface; as, to countersink a screw or bolt into woodwork.
    • Countersink To chamfer or form a depression around the top of (a hole in wood, metal, etc.) for the reception of the head of a screw or bolt below the surface, either wholly or in part; as, to countersink a hole for a screw.
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Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
    • countersink To form by drilling or turning, as a cavity in timber or other materials, for the reception of the head of a bolt or screw, a plate of iron, etc., in order that it may be nearly or quite flush with the surface: as, to countersink a hole for a screw.
    • countersink To cause to sink in any other body so as to be nearly or quite flush with its surface: as, to countersink a screw or bolt by making a depression for its head.
    • n countersink A drill or brace-bit for countersinking, variously made, according as it is to be used on wood, iron, brass, etc. Specifically— A boring-bit having a conical or spherical cutter, used to make a depression to receive the head of a screw.
    • n countersink An enlargement of a hole to receive the head of a screw or bolt.
    • n countersink The recess in the chamber of a gun into which the rim of the cartridge fits.
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Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • v.t Countersink to bevel the edge of a hole, as for the head of a screw-nail (a a in fig.)β€”it is usually done by a Countersink-bit (b in fig.) in a brace
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Etymology

Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
Fr.,β€”L. contra, against.

Usage

In literature:

Countersink this hole enough to allow the head to sink flush with the surface.
"Handwork in Wood" by William Noyes
The method of working is: Plane up, mark out, bore holes, countersink, glue dowels and complete joints.
"Woodwork Joints" by William Fairham
Fasten securely on whatever form of mounting you have decided on, countersinking the wires on the under side.
"Home Taxidermy for Pleasure and Profit" by Albert B. Farnham
The round-headed screws are best, unless you want to countersink them.
"How Two Boys Made Their Own Electrical Apparatus" by Thomas M. (Thomas Matthew) St. John
Between that and the end of the long arm, drill (or punch) two screw-holes, and countersink them.
"Taxidermy and Zoological Collecting" by William T. Hornaday
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In news:

Countersink first, drill the pilot hole second.
That may sound backward, but it's the easiest way to ensure a perfectly smooth countersink .
Also, last time out, there was a query in the Q&A section countersinking a rule joint without leaving a notch.
Eight more operations – including drilling, boring, counterboring, countersinking and tapping holes at various angles – remove an additional 60 pounds, resulting in a finished component that weighs half as much as the raw stock.
I use the countersink collar from one of my drill-and-countersink sets.
Countersink first, drill the pilot hole second.
That may sound backward, but it's the easiest way to ensure a perfectly smooth countersink.
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