corsair

Definitions

  • WordNet 3.6
    • n corsair a swift pirate ship (often operating with official sanction)
    • n corsair a pirate along the Barbary Coast
    • ***
Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
    • Corsair (Zoöl) A Californian market fish (Sebastichthys rosaceus).
    • Corsair A pirate; one who cruises about without authorization from any government, to seize booty on sea or land.
    • Corsair A piratical vessel. "Barbary corsairs . . . infested the coast of the Mediterranean."
    • ***
Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
    • n corsair One who cruises or scours the ocean with an armed vessel, without a commission from any sovereign or state, seizing and plundering merchant vessels, or making booty on land; a pirate; a freebooter.
    • n corsair A piratical vessel; sometimes, a privateer.
    • n corsair A scorpænoid fish, Sebastichthys rosaceus, with smooth cranial ridges, moderate-sized scales, and pale blotches surrounded by purplish shades on the sides. It is about 12 inches long, and one of the most abundant species of the genus, inhabiting rather deep water along the Californian coast. See cut in next column.
    • n corsair Any pirate-bug of the family Reduriidæ.
    • ***
Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • n Corsair kor′sār a pirate: a pirate's vessel.
    • ***

Etymology

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
F. corsaire,cf. It. corsare, corsale, Pr. corsari,), LL. corsarius, fr. L. cursus, a running, course, whence Sp. corso, cruise, corsa, cruise, coasting voyage, corsear, to cruise against the enemy, to pirate, corsario, cruising, a privateer authorized to cruise against the enemy. See Course
Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
Fr. corsaire, one who makes the course or ranges—L. cursus, a running—currĕre, to run.

Usage

In literature:

Between 1492 and 1580, the date of Ali's death, there was a period in which the Moorish corsairs were supreme.
"A History of Sea Power" by William Oliver Stevens and Allan Westcott
The people who followed this corsair amounted to over a million of men of war alone.
"The Philippine Islands, 1493–1898, Volume XXXVI, 1649–1666" by Various
His life is not, in its way, less characteristic of his time than that of starving Robert Greene, or of Thomas Lodge the corsair.
"The English Novel in the Time of Shakespeare" by J. J. Jusserand
The Corsair is intended for a remarkable personage.
"English Critical Essays" by Various
Some men are born to be drivers of tram-cars, some to be captains of corsairs.
"Romantic Spain" by John Augustus O'Shea
In a sea-fight with another corsair their pilot was killed, and soon after a fierce storm blew them far off shore.
"Historic Tales, Vol. 12 (of 15)" by Charles Morris
Except for occasional incursions by corsairs and some severe earthquakes the island has rarely had its peace disturbed.
"Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 7, Slice 4" by Various
At last the fire of the corsair ceased, and a whiff of air carried away the smoke.
"Stories of Our Naval Heroes" by Various
In this space lay the long, looming black mass of the most dreaded corsair ship ever to sail the void.
"The World with a Thousand Moons" by Edmond Hamilton
In this way "The Corsair," "Lara," "The Giaour," and "The Siege of Corinth" were composed.
"Methods of Authors" by Hugo Erichsen
These rude chiefs, profiting by their maritime position, followed the dreadful trade of the corsair.
"History of the Reign of Philip the Second, King of Spain." by William H. Prescott
From this time the corsairs and rovers became more numerous and audacious every year.
"The West Indies and the Spanish Main [1899]" by James Rodway
He was preparing for his great expedition to Tunis to root out the corsairs, and had other work on hand.
"The Divorce of Catherine of Aragon" by J.A. Froude
Even Kierkegaard forgot for a moment the editor of The Corsair in his praise.
"Library of the World's Best Literature, Ancient and Modern, Vol. 16" by Various
The old corsair blood was boiling in their veins.
"Dixmude" by Charles Le Goffic
On the way to Malta they were captured by a Moorish corsair, and ransomed by the payment of their full value in gold.
"The Story of Malta" by Maturin M. Ballou
He was a native of France, and a brave and chivalrous corsair, as corsairs go.
"The Ifs of History" by Joseph Edgar Chamberlin
Well, what do you and M. Onesime think of the corsair?
"Avarice-Anger:" by Eugène Sue
All her Corsair stories were allied to that far, fathomless deep.
"John Marchmont's Legacy, Volumes I-III" by Mary E. Braddon
I was carried at five years of age to Algiers with my mother, who had been taken by corsairs from the coast of Sicily.
"Shorter Novels, Eighteenth Century" by Samuel Johnson
***

In poetry:

Marquette and Joliet,
Carrier, La Salle,
Priest, corsair, gentleman,
Gallants one and all.
"French Pioneers" by Stephen Vincent Benet
Southward with fleet of ice
Sailed the corsair Death;
Wild and gast blew the blast,
And the east-wind was his breath.
"By The Seaside : Sir Humphrey Gilbert" by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow
A corsair sloop, hull down, retires
With mysteries in her hold;
Her sails, against the wizard fires
Of morn, are torn and old.
"A Dream Of Romance" by Maurice Thompson
The seabird, sweeping free and far
On wings of wonder, will not see
That green isle and its coral bar,
That corsair and his mystery.
"The Domain" by John Le Gay Brereton
``You have cleared the main of the corsair's keel,
And the forest of outlaws' tread;
Your hounds follow swift on the felon's heel,
And the trail of the ravisher fled.
"The Wind Speaks" by Alfred Austin
This pirate of the over sea,
No black-hulled brig he sails,
No black flag at the mizzen-peak
Flaunts death-heads to the gales.
Yet fiercer than the wild Corsair
This pirate of the upper air.
"The Hawk" by James Edwin Campbell

In news:

United Artists Communications Inc, which operates movie theaters and a cable television company, has formed Corsair Pictures, a New York based company.
Hangar 9 E-conversions: P-47, F4U Corsair & F6F Hellcat.
A single odd photograph led to a four-year quest to replicate the 1960 Edsel Corsair that never was.
The F4U-5NL Corsair that Snodgrass flies was built in 1952 and was based on the U.S.S.
You can't take anything about "Le Corsaire" seriously — except the dancing.
Few 19th-century classics have as many opportunities for virtuosity as American Ballet Theater's colorful production of "Le Corsaire".
When it comes to warbirds, there are your usual suspects to choose from: Mustangs, Corsairs, Spitfires, etc.
The 2001 Pontiac Aztek, the 1987 Yugo, the 1958 Edsel Corsair -- here's one list of the top 10 worst cars.
Corsairs outrebound Redhawks en route to 88-72 win.
The Corsairs took the Redhawks to boarding school on Sunday afternoon.
Roane hits five 3-pointers as Corsairs win tourney consolation title.
You can see from this photo of a museum kept Corsair that silver is a good choice for rivet and screw detail .
At 2-4 Corsairs need to win out to make postseason.
The new giant scale F4U Corsair from Top Flite is a beautiful airplane and with a 55cc gas engine in the nose it will be a great warbird performer.
Corsairs almost beat high-flying Comets in Eureka.
***