consubstantiate

Definitions

  • WordNet 3.6
    • v consubstantiate unite in one common substance "Thought is consubstantiated with the object"
    • v consubstantiate become united in substance "thought and the object consubstantiate"
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Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
    • a Consubstantiate Partaking of the same substance; united; consubstantial. "We must love her [the wife] that is thus consubstantiate with us."
    • v. t Consubstantiate To cause to unite, or to regard as united, in one common substance or nature. "His soul must be consubstantiated with reason."
    • v. i Consubstantiate To profess or belive the doctrine of consubstantion. "The consubstantiating church and priest."
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Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
    • consubstantiate To unite in one common substance or nature, or regard as so united.
    • consubstantiate To profess the doctrine of consubstantiation.
    • consubstantiate Same as consubstantial.
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Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • v.t Consubstantiate to unite in one common substance or nature
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Etymology

Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
L. con, with, and Substantial.

Usage

In literature:

O Father, Son, and Holy Ghost, the consubstantial and undivided Godhead, I call upon thee and glorify thee.
"Barlaam and Ioasaph" by St. John of Damascus
Is that then the divine substance wherein Father and Son are consubstantial?
"Ulysses" by James Joyce
He had been reading a book that affirmed the consubstantiality of the sleep-dream and the hypnotic illusion.
"The Landlord at Lion's Head, Complete" by William Dean Howells
The council decided, in the year 325, that Christ was consubstantial with the Father.
"Lectures of Col. R. G. Ingersoll - Latest" by Robert Green Ingersoll
There are persons who talk a great deal about Consubstantiation, and yet they know not what it means.
"The Way of Salvation in the Lutheran Church" by G. H. Gerberding
He has declared against the consubstantiality and proper divinity of Christ as well as His co-eternity.
"The English Church in the Eighteenth Century" by Charles J. Abbey and John H. Overton
This fresh virtue consisted in the belief in a power consubstantially divine and human.
"Myth and Science" by Tito Vignoli
Consubstantiation, and ubiquity of Christ's body.
"History of Rationalism Embracing a Survey of the Present State of Protestant Theology" by John F. Hurst
It is true also that Scholasticism is not only ministerial to Popery, but in parts is consubstantial with Popery.
"The Posthumous Works of Thomas De Quincey, Vol. II (2 vols)" by Thomas De Quincey
But table and non-table, since they are given to our thought together, must be consubstantial.
"The Will to Believe" by William James
Thence came Macedonius, who denied the Godhead of the Holy Spirit, consubstantial with the Father and the Son.
"The Formation of Christendom, Volume VI" by Thomas W. (Thomas William) Allies
The reason can only be satisfied with an aliment consubstantial with itself.
"The Religious Sentiment" by Daniel G. Brinton
At last he was God consubstantial with God.
"Ancient and Modern Celebrated Freethinkers" by Charles Bradlaugh, A. Collins, and J. Watts
The Christology that makes Christ Jesus consubstantial with God and with man satisfies man's deep-felt need.
"Monophysitism Past and Present" by A. A. Luce
Again, the Lutheran doctrine of Consubstantiation destroys the nature of the Sacrament.
"The Church: Her Books and Her Sacraments" by E. E. Holmes
After his death, the troubles caused by the single word "consubstantial" agitated the empire with renewed violence.
"A Philosophical Dictionary, Volume 2 (of 10)" by François-Marie Arouet (AKA Voltaire)
These two councils, corresponding together, undo all that the Council of Nice did, and proscribe the consubstantiality.
"A Philosophical Dictionary, Volume 3 (of 10)" by François-Marie Arouet (AKA Voltaire)
At last He was made God consubstantial with God.
"A Philosophical Dictionary, Volume 4 (of 10)" by François-Marie Arouet (AKA Voltaire)
The Father is the essential principle, and yet He is consubstantial with the other two Persons.
"A Mediaeval Mystic" by Vincent Scully
Now who, in the fourth century, professed the consubstantiality of the Trinity?
"St. Peter, His Name and His Office" by Thomas W. Allies
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In news:

"Consubstantial with the Father": That tongue-twister in the new Mass translation is one way we describe Jesus.
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In science:

Here E ∗ denotes the dual module; passing to duals is consubstantial with the nature of amenability as a limiting property, and indeed the corresponding condition on al l modules simply characterises compact groups instead.
A note on topological amenability
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