conoid

Definitions

  • WordNet 3.6
    • n conoid a shape whose base is a circle and whose sides taper up to a point
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Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
    • Conoid (Geom) A solid formed by the revolution of a conic section about its axis; as, a parabolic conoid, elliptic conoid, etc.; -- more commonly called paraboloid ellipsoid, etc.
    • Conoid (Geom) A surface which may be generated by a straight line moving in such a manner as always to meet a given straight line and a given curve, and continue parallel to a given plane.
    • Conoid Anything that has a form resembling that of a cone.
    • a Conoid Resembling a cone; conoidal.
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Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
    • conoid Having the form of a cone; conoidal.
    • n conoid In geometry: A solid formed by the revolution of a conic section about its axis. A skew surface which may be generated by a straight line moving in such a manner as to touch a straight line and curve, and continue parallel to a given plane. A surface generated by the revolution of an arc of a circle about its sine. If the conic section is a parabola, the resulting solid is a parabolic conoid, or paraboloid; if a hyperbola, the solid is a hyperbolic conoid, or hyperboloid; if an ellipse, an elliptic conoid, a spheroid, or an ellipsoid. But the term conoid is often used to include the hyperboloids and paraboloids and to exclude the spheroids. This is the meaning of the Greek word with Archimedes.
    • n conoid In anatomy, the conarium or pineal body.
    • conoid In conchology, resembling or having the characters of the Conidæ.
    • n conoid A gastropod of the family Conidæ.
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Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • n Conoid kōn′oid anything like a cone in form
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Etymology

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
Gr. kwnoeidh`s conical; kw^nos cone + e'i^dos form: cf. F. conoïde,
Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
Gr. kōnos, a cone, eidos, form.

Usage

In literature:

It is an obtuse conoid, closed with a star-shaped disk.
"The Life of the Spider" by J. Henri Fabre
From some experiments I made myself a score of years ago, I am inclined to prefer a plane surface for the conoid to work upon.
"Scientific American Supplement, No. 447, July 26, 1884" by Various
He also wrote on conoids and spheroids.
"Beacon Lights of History, Volume III" by John Lord
Many different forms have been given to the heads of projectiles, as flat, ogival, hemispherical, conoidal, parabolic, blunt trifaced, etc.
"Scientific American Supplement, No. 803, May 23, 1891" by Various
A crust of conoidical shells covered the rock at certain points, the dry rot of the granite.
"Toilers of the Sea" by Victor Hugo
Its conoid shape may class it with the one shown in Fig.
"The Archaeology of the Yakima Valley" by Harlan Ingersoll Smith
With a conoidal orifice the coefficient was 0.961 at 55 deg.
"Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 14, Slice 1" by Various
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