coign

Definitions

  • WordNet 3.6
    • n coign the keystone of an arch
    • n coign expandable metal or wooden wedge used by printers to lock up a form within a chase
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Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
    • n Coign koin A var. spelling of Coin Quoin, a corner, wedge; -- chiefly used in the phrase coign of vantage, a position advantageous for action or observation. "From some shielded nook or coign of vantage.""The lithosphere would be depressed on four faces; . . . the four projecting coigns would stand up as continents."
    • Coign an expandable metal or wooden wedge used by printers to lock up a form within a chase.
    • Coign the keystone of an arch.
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Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
    • n coign A corner; a coin or quoin; a projecting point. See quoin.
    • n coign In geology, an original angular elevation of land around which as a corner-stone continental growth has taken place.
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Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • n Coign koin a corner or external angle: a corner-stone: a wedge
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Etymology

Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
Coin.

Usage

In literature:

The sight from this 'coign of vantage' was indeed imposing.
"The Last Voyage" by Lady (Annie Allnutt) Brassey
Before you have discouraged her, you may have to shunt her off of every plate or other "coign of vantage" with boards or shingles.
"Ways of Nature" by John Burroughs
The coigns, parapets and mullions were all of a delicately-tinted orange stone.
"The Thread of Gold" by Arthur Christopher Benson
From this coign she had a view of the secluded portion of the Trescott grounds that was behind the stable.
"The Monster and Other Stories" by Stephen Crane
From their coigns the priceless portraits of the S. Croix gazed complacently down upon him.
"Trusia" by Davis Brinton
When Castle left the bank, about four-thirty, he walked soberly up town to the Coign Hotel and ascended to his room.
"A Canadian Bankclerk" by J. P. Buschlen
Deign, then, oh my lord, to rest in these arms of mine, and contemplate your victory from a safe coign of vantage.
"The Serapion Brethren," by Ernst Theodor Wilhelm Hoffmann
The lawyer jumped up and drew a protesting Emerald from her horsehair coign of vantage.
"Shadows of Flames" by Amelie Rives
What a view there is from coigne of vantage!
"With the World's Great Travellers, Volume 2" by Various
From that coign of vantage he saw the town stretched out beneath him.
"The Cottage of Delight" by Will N. Harben
From coign to shaft the practised glider crept, A shadow, lost where shadows darkest slept.
"The Poetical Works of Sir Edward Bulwer Lytton, Bart. M.P." by Edward Bulwer Lytton
Through its dusky green light he moved cautiously forward to a coign of vantage.
"Strange Stories of Colonial Days" by Various
Besides, he had selected a dark spot for his coign of observation.
"The Song of Songs" by Hermann Sudermann
And the menace of its coming left no tiniest coign of foothold for hope in its path.
"The Pursuit" by Frank (Frank Mackenzie) Savile
I glanced up to the coign of the corner house.
"The Bandolero" by Mayne Reid
Near Bishopscourt you have one of these 'coigns of vantage.
"Australian Pictures" by Howard Willoughby
As the news swept through the town there were many who gathered upon coigns of vantage to witness the action.
"The Siege of Mafeking (1900)" by J. Angus Hamilton
He chased a number of them into the sanctity of their own yards, but from these coigns they continued to ridicule him.
"Whilomville Stories" by Stephen Crane
Buttress, nor coign of vantage, but this bird Hath made his pendant bed, and procreant cradle.
"Fictitious & Symbolic Creatures in Art" by John Vinycomb
Checagau to them was not a coign of vantage between great waters.
"Historic Towns of the Western States" by Various
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In poetry:

Where at each coign of every antique street,
A memory hath taken root in stone:
There, Raleigh shone; there, toil'd Franciscan feet;
There, Johnson flinch'd not, but endured alone.
"Oxford" by Lionel Pigot Johnson
They trembled from coign to coign, and tower to tower,
Along high terraces quicker than dream they flew.
And some of them steadily glowed, and some soon vanished,
And some strange shadows threw.
"The House Of Dust: Part 01: 04:" by Conrad Potter Aiken

In news:

Members of the all girls band, 'Short Lived Affair', (l) Kaitlyn Young, 17, Kristen Valenti, 17, Taylor Coigne, 17, Rachel Vistacion, 16, and Monica Kelly, 17.
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