cocoon

Definitions

  • a, b, c, d. Larva, cocoon, nympha, and insect of Caddis-fly
    a, b, c, d. Larva, cocoon, nympha, and insect of Caddis-fly
  • WordNet 3.6
    • v cocoon wrap in or as if in a cocoon, as for protection
    • v cocoon retreat as if into a cocoon, as from an unfriendly environment "Families cocoon around the T.V. set most evenings","She loves to stay at home and cocoon"
    • n cocoon silky envelope spun by the larvae of many insects to protect pupas and by spiders to protect eggs
    • ***
Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
  • Interesting fact: Silk was developed in China were it was kept a secret for more than two thousands years. Anyone found trying to smuggle silkworm eggs or cocoons out of the country was immediately put to death
    • Cocoon An oblong case in which the silkworm lies in its chrysalis state. It is formed of threads of silk spun by the worm just before leaving the larval state. From these the silk of commerce is prepared.
    • Cocoon (Zoöl) The case constructed by any insect to contain its larva or pupa.
    • Cocoon (Zoöl) The case of silk made by spiders to protect their eggs.
    • Cocoon (Zoöl) The egg cases of mucus, etc., made by leeches and other worms.
    • ***
Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
  • Interesting fact: The average cocoon contains about 300-400 metres of silk
    • n cocoon The silky tissue or envelop which the larvæ of many insects spin as a covering for themselves while they are in the chrysalis state. The cocoon of the silkworm is a familiar example. See cut under Bombyx.
    • n cocoon The silken case in which many spiders inclose their eggs. In some species the mother incloses herself with the eggs until they are hatched; in others she carries the cocoon about with her, or conceals it near her web, until the young emerge.
    • n cocoon Generally, an egg-case, such as is produced by various animals.
    • n cocoon The South African bastard wildebeest or brindled gnu, Catoblepas gorgon. Dallas.
    • cocoon To form a cocoon.
    • cocoon To wrap as in a cocoon.
    • ***
Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
  • Interesting fact: Some silkworms can spin cocoons that contain more than two miles of silk
    • n Cocoon ko-kōōn′ the silken sheath spun by the larvæ of many insects in passing into the pupa or resting stage
    • ***

Quotations

  • James Russell Lowell
    James%20Russell%20Lowell
    “The mind can weave itself warmly in the cocoon of its own thoughts, and dwell a hermit anywhere.”

Etymology

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
F. cocon, dim. of coque, shell of egge and insects, fr. L. concha, mussel shell. See Conch
Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
Fr. cocon, from coque, a shell—L. concha, a shell.

Usage

In literature:

Darkness wrapped him as if it were the soft swathing of some black cocoon.
"Two Thousand Miles Below" by Charles Willard Diffin
I am at present in the cocoon.
"Sir Tom" by Mrs. Oliphant
The outside of the cocoon is useless and can be removed by placing the cocoon in warm water.
"What Shall We Do Now?: Five Hundred Games and Pastimes" by Dorothy Canfield Fisher
They pierce and drop with the fruit, seek shelter in the bark, where they spin a cocoon and pass the winter.
"The Book of Pears and Plums" by Edward Bartrum
Prince Machiavelli blinked at him from a cocoon of tapes and straps.
"The Scarlet Lake Mystery" by Harold Leland Goodwin
Silk cloth is woven from the cocoons made by silkworms.
"Health Lessons" by Alvin Davison
In about six weeks we had the cocoons.
"Belford's Magazine, Volume II, No. 8, January, 1889" by Various
That same evening, the May-fly broke through her cocoon.
"The Pond" by Carl Ewald
He looked over to the other bed in the luxurious room and saw Scotty, wrapped like a cocoon in sheet and blanket.
"The Flaming Mountain" by Harold Leland Goodwin
It looked like a moth emerging from a cocoon and becoming a butterfly.
"Sinister Paradise" by Robert Moore Williams
A considerable loss is said to take place in selling cocoons in the European markets.
"Notes on Agriculture in Cyprus and Its Products" by William Bevan
The care of the worms and of the cocoons falls entirely upon the women, as well as the spinning of the silk and the weaving of the cloth.
"Japanese Girls and Women" by Alice Mabel Bacon
I was born a worm, and I ain't never found the cocoon that would change me into a butterfly.
"Just Around the Corner" by Fannie Hurst
Eggs deposited in a cocoon after copulation.
"Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 5, Slice 7" by Various
She wanted me to see some butterflies come out of their cocoons, so I went with her.
"Bee and Butterfly" by Lucy Foster Madison
He even dashed into the peak of the roof and brought down the white cocoon balls dangling with cobweb.
"A-Birding on a Bronco" by Florence A. Merriam
I said it reminded me of the caterpillars and cocoons which my little brother keeps in glass boxes.
"L'Arrabiata and Other Tales" by Paul Heyse
I said it reminded me of the caterpillars and cocoons which my little brother keeps in glass boxes.
"The Dead Lake and Other Tales" by Paul Heyse
Just before me swung within the maze a triple cradle or cocoon string provided for the young Labyrintheans.
"Old Farm Fairies:" by Henry Christopher McCook
The insect emerges and spins its cocoon in a crack of the bark.
"Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 2, Slice 3" by Various
***

In poetry:

"First it is a little grub,
And then it is a nice yellow cocoon,
And then the butterfly
Eats its way out soon.
"I Write About The Butterfly" by Louisa May Alcott
They brought her in, a shattered small
Cocoon,
With a little bruised body like
A startled moon;
And all the subtle symphonies of her
A twilight rune.
"Suicide" by Djuna Barnes
thickly it wraps, between the clean sea
and the moon, the earth's green head.
Trapped in its cocoon, its choking breath
we know the shape of death:
Death is a cloud.
"The Shape of Death" by May Swenson
I have a fancy: how shall I bring it
Home to all mortals wherever they be?
Say it or sing it? Shoe it or wing it,
So it may outrun or outfly ME,
Merest cocoon-web whence it broke free?
"The Secret" by James Russell Lowell

In news:

The Egg Nebula, as astronomers call the object they discovered 37 years ago, is a cocoon of dust and gas illuminated like a lantern by an aging central star.
Silkworms spin cocoons in a silk farm at the Qianjin Township in Zhejiang Province, China.
Because there isn't a whooping cough vaccine for newborns, some experts recommend "cocooning" — vaccinating everyone who lives with an infant — as a strategy for protection.
When ice and snow blanket Tulsa, we find ourselves inside, bundled up, deliberating the objective of prying ourselves from our knitted cocoon.
Movie theaters are the cocoons in which these dreams are enabled.
Bizarre creature discovered in ancient cocoon.
Rick Steves' Europe: Erfurt is authentic medieval Germany, once cocooned by Iron Curtain.
Made with a tough, water-resistant nylon exterior and a rip-resistant interior with strategically placed padding, the new line of B7 backpacks provides a protective cocoon for your gear.
Bizarre Creature Found in 200 Year Old Cocoon.
Bizarre creature discovered in ancient cocoon.
The cocoon looks like those produced by living leeches.
Bizarre creature found in 200-million-year-old cocoon.
Cocooning, or vaccinating members of a household that are in contact with a person at risk of infection, substantially reduces the disease burden of pertussis in young infants.
The BodySound chairs include a pair of speakers positioned by your ears, two vertically aligned speakers behind your spine, and a larger seat-cushion speaker that forms a sound cocoon.
Cocoon of government culture spurs lack of common-sense decisions.
***

In science:

As before, the radius of the bow shock is defined as R and the radius of the cocoon is written as Rc = λR.
On the interaction of FR-II radio sources with the intracluster medium
The pressure difference between cocoon and the shocked gas can be equated to the acceleration of this narrow dense layer plus the gravitational acceleration.
On the interaction of FR-II radio sources with the intracluster medium
These solutions can be used to investigate how the aspect ratio of the source, which I define here to be given by the ratio of the jet to the radius of the cocoon, Lj /Rc , changes with time.
On the interaction of FR-II radio sources with the intracluster medium
To determine the time dependence of Lj in this approximation we return to the method employed by KA97 where the jet as it propagates through the cocoon is assumed to be confined by the cocoon pressure, pj = pc .
On the interaction of FR-II radio sources with the intracluster medium
The evolution of the jet length and cocoon radius for the perturbed solution discussed in the text compared to the unperturbed solution.
On the interaction of FR-II radio sources with the intracluster medium
This increased lobe pressure acts to collimate the jet since the jet is assumed to be in pressure balance with the cocoon material and the jet therefore propagates more quickly through the external atmosphere.
On the interaction of FR-II radio sources with the intracluster medium
If this is the case then the swept up gas may well be being entrained within the cocoon.
On the interaction of FR-II radio sources with the intracluster medium
This is most likely to occur in the first instance to the sides of the cocoon where most cold material has accumulated.
On the interaction of FR-II radio sources with the intracluster medium
Despite this preferential accumulation of material at the surface of the cocoon selfsimilar expansion will still occur since there is a feedback between the cocoon pressure and hotspot pressure brought about by the jet reaching pressure balance with the cocoon.
On the interaction of FR-II radio sources with the intracluster medium
The cocoon pressure will remain high determined by the properties of the atmosphere in the cluster core, the jet pressure will therefore also remain high and hence the hotspot pressure will exceed that predicted for self-similar expansion into a declining atmosphere.
On the interaction of FR-II radio sources with the intracluster medium
Any instability will allow swept-up gas to be entrained into the cocoon material and since the density of this gas increases towards the centre of the source, it seems likely that any instability will be most apparent in this region.
On the interaction of FR-II radio sources with the intracluster medium
An alternative scenario is that the RT instability is effective over the entire contact surface; in this case mixing of the radio emitting plasma and swept-up gas will be very efficient and the cocoon will be filled with X-ray emitting material with the radio-emitting plasma having a non-unity filling factor.
On the interaction of FR-II radio sources with the intracluster medium
In principle it may be possible to use the dynamics of radio sources to provide an additional probe of the cluster environment, however this requires an independent method of measuring the pressure within the cocoon and expansion speed of the source.
On the interaction of FR-II radio sources with the intracluster medium
Whether the thermal conductivity is suppressed or not the results derived above show that the swept-up gas is efficiently heated, a bright X-ray shell develops between the cocoon and bow-shock and this gas has a cooling time longer than the surrounding material.
On the interaction of FR-II radio sources with the intracluster medium
In reality, this layer will be thin, while the source is expanding highly supersonically, however as the Mach number of the expanding cocoon falls the mass of cooler gas will become significant.
On the interaction of FR-II radio sources with the intracluster medium
***