cobalt

Definitions

  • WordNet 3.6
    • n cobalt a hard ferromagnetic silver-white bivalent or trivalent metallic element; a trace element in plant and animal nutrition
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Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
    • Cobalt A commercial name of a crude arsenic used as fly poison.
    • Cobalt (Chem) A tough, lustrous, reddish white metal of the iron group, not easily fusible, and somewhat magnetic. Atomic weight 59.1. Symbol Co.
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Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
    • n cobalt Chemical symbol, Co; atomic weight, 58.8. A metal of a steel-gray color and a specific gravity variously given at from 8.52 to 8.95. It closely resembles nickel, the atomic weights of the two metals being the same, and their specific gravities nearly or quite the same. They have also very nearly the same ductility and tenacity, are almost always found in intimate association, and have in many respects a marked resemblance to iron, but are less fusible than that metal, and much less magnetic. Cobalt might be, and is to a very small extent, used for the same purposes for which nickel is used, especially for plating the surface of iron; but it is much rarer than nickel, is procured with more difficulty in the metallic form, and is consequently a dearer metal. The most important ores of cobalt are cobaltite, smaltite, and linnæite. (See these words.) Cobalt ores occur in a considerable number of localities, but nowhere in large quantity. The chief supply of the cobalt preparations comes from Saxony, Bohemia, Hesse, and Norway. The principal value of cohalt in the arts is due to the fact that its protoxid furnishes an intense and beautiful blue color, of importance in painting, and especially in the decoration of porcelain and glass. (See smalt and zaffre.) Also spelled kobalt.
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Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • n Cobalt kō′bawlt a metal the ores of which are sparingly distributed—in the metallic state found in meteoric stones or aerolites, generally occurring combined with arsenic: a blue pigment, prepared from the foregoing—also Cō′balt-blue
    • adj Cobalt of this deep-blue colour
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Etymology

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
G. kobalt, prob. fr. kobold, kobel, goblin, MHG. kobolt,; perh. akin to G. koben, pigsty, hut, AS. cofa, room, cofgodas, household gods, Icel. kofi, hut. If so, the ending -old, stands for older -walt, -wald, being the same as -ald, in E. herald, and the word would mean ruler, or governor in a house, house spirit, the metal being so called by miners, because it was poisonous and troublesome. Cf. Kobold Cove Goblin

Usage

In literature:

It seems that 'Red' Davis, who works for Toumine, was taking a load of hay to Lake Cobalt.
"The Heart of Thunder Mountain" by Edfrid A. Bingham
Cobalt is a fantasy town.
"Westward with the Prince of Wales" by W. Douglas Newton
Next, prepare scales with gamboge, cobalt, and vermilion.
"The Elements of Drawing" by John Ruskin
Oxyd of cobalt cobalt.
"Elements of Chemistry," by Antoine Lavoisier
On Tralee the public water supply has traces of zinc and cobalt added.
"The Hate Disease" by William Fitzgerald Jenkins
Cobalt and Vandyke brown in the hollows.
"The Use of a Box of Colours" by Harry Willson
Timber and wood-pulp are exported (over half of each to Great Britain), with paper, ice and some cobalt and nickel ore.
"Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 8, Slice 7" by Various
The regulus of cobalt, dissolved in spirit of nitre, gives a red.
"International Short Stories" by Various
Care should be taken to thoroughly ignite before adding the cobalt nitrate solution.
"The Elements of Blowpipe Analysis" by Frederick Hutton Getman
He had similar eyes of almost cobalt blue when contrasted with the dead whiteness of a skin that gave the impression of being powdered.
"Carnival" by Compton Mackenzie
Those of the general's daughter were sidereal, not white nor cobalt, but something that combined the two.
"A Transient Guest" by Edgar Saltus
A bag was filled with the crustaceae, whose shells were of a cobalt blue.
"Abandoned" by Jules Verne
The mining industry, for which the town was formerly also famous and which embraced tin, silver and cobalt, has now ceased.
"Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 2, Slice 2" by Various
Cobalt has a similar stabilizing effect.
"The New Gresham Encyclopedia. Vol. 1 Part 1" by Various
The minerals worked include copper, quicksilver, manganese, cobalt, porcelain clay, alabaster, graphite.
"The New Gresham Encyclopedia. Vol. 1 Part 3" by Various
Very good results in soap may be obtained by mixing a fast blue, as ultramarine or cobalt blue, with a red as rhodamine or eosine.
"Soap-Making Manual" by E. G. Thomssen
My God, the dawn was electric; it was the purest blue I'd ever seen, a swath of artist's cobalt.
"Life Blood" by Thomas Hoover
One longs to ask the "miss" whether she saw the sunlight, and the cobalt sea, and the glorified whitewash, with its amethyst shadows, for 7-1/2d.
"Alas!" by Rhoda Broughton
Nickel ore is worked in Malaga; cobalt in Oviedo and Castellon.
"Spain" by Wentworth Webster
The glaze was slightly "blued" with cobalt, and speckled with bubbles and minute black spots, which seemed to show careless firing.
"Colonial Homes and Their Furnishings" by Mary H. Northend
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In poetry:

Thick foliage
Placid beneath warm suns,
Tawn fore-shores
Washed in the cobalt of oblivions;
"'The Age Demanded'" by Ezra Pound
O you away high there,
you that lean
From amber lattices upon the cobalt night,
I am below amid the pine trees,
Amid the little pine trees, hear me!
"Au Jardin" by Ezra Pound
No change on these sea-islands!
The huge piled clouds range
White in the cobalt sky;
The moss hangs,
And the strong, tiring sea-winds blow--
While day on glistering day goes by.
"Two Pages" by William Hervey Allen Jr

In news:

Canmine's Cobalt Refinery Starts Loading Feedstock .
Canmine Resources announced recently that its remodeled cobalt-nickel refinery in northeastern Ontario, Canada, had started loading feedstock .
'Go There' Wednesdays: Kelis ' Cobalt Blue Liner.
Cobalt Studios Inc, $750 for five days, Reservation $150, 845/583-7025.
Polo Ralph Lauren Candy Lollipop cobalt blue metal.
Cobalt's menu as lustrous as the oceanfront setting.
Think lemon, Kelly, brick and cobalt solids and bold geometric prints.
Steven Haine and Christiaan Vrints are concerned that only two of 49 trials directly compared cobalt-chromium everolimus-eluting stents (CoCr-EES) with bare-metal stents (BMS).
Miners at Cobalt's Westchester mine, featured on 2011 Spike TV program , vote for UMWA.
A clear majority of miners at Cobalt Coal's Westchester mine in McDowell County, W Va.
The sky turned a deep, cobalt blue.
A single cobalt atom (purple peak) over a copper surface (orange, yellow, and pink).
"I'm excited and honored to be on Wind Tunnel with Dave Despain," said Enders, driver of the GK Motorsports Chevy Cobalt.
Cobalt chromium gets the credit.
Red detailing and bits of cobalt highlight the cool white-and-blue palette inspired by the easy living of New England.
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In science:

Possible technological applications include stopping magnetic atoms such as iron, nickel, and cobalt for controlled deposition of magnetic quantum dots and magnetic storage.
Stopping Supersonic Beams with an Atomic Coilgun
However, the detailed characters of the spin fluctuations, for example, its anisotropy, is unknown in the cobaltates.
Hydration-induced anisotropic spin fluctuations in Na_{x}CoO_{2}\cdot1.3H_{2}O superconductor
The other outstanding issue in the cobaltate is the role of water intercalation in achieving superconductivity.
Hydration-induced anisotropic spin fluctuations in Na_{x}CoO_{2}\cdot1.3H_{2}O superconductor
In conclusion, we have presented 59Co-NMR measurements and analysis on the hydrated and unhydrated cobalt oxide single crystals.
Hydration-induced anisotropic spin fluctuations in Na_{x}CoO_{2}\cdot1.3H_{2}O superconductor
Twenty-six cobalt isotopes have so far been observed; the discovery of these isotopes is discussed.
Discovery of the Cobalt Isotopes
Twenty-six cobalt isotopes from A = 50 − 75 have been discovered so far; these include one stable, nine proton-rich and 16 neutron-rich isotopes.
Discovery of the Cobalt Isotopes
Over 60% of all possible cobalt isotopes have been produced and identified so far.
Discovery of the Cobalt Isotopes
Cobalt isotopes as a function of time they were discovered.
Discovery of the Cobalt Isotopes
Figure A summarizes the year of first discovery for all cobalt isotopes identified by the method of discovery.
Discovery of the Cobalt Isotopes
The radioactive cobalt isotopes were produced using heavy-ion fusion evaporation (FE), light-particle reactions (LP), proton-capture reactions (PC), photo-nuclear reactions PN), deep-inelastic reactions (DI), and projectile fragmentation or fission (PF).
Discovery of the Cobalt Isotopes
In the following paragraphs, the discovery of each cobalt isotope is discussed in detail.
Discovery of the Cobalt Isotopes
Co was uniquely identified for the first time in 1941 by Livingood and Seaborg in the paper Radioactive Isotopes of Cobalt .
Discovery of the Cobalt Isotopes
Beta-decay curves were measured following chemical separation and a half-life of 1.75(5) h was observed. “Chemical extractions showed this activity to belong to cobalt, and most likely to Co61 .” This half-life agrees with the presently accepted value of 1.650(5) h.
Discovery of the Cobalt Isotopes
Since this activity could not be assigned to any known isotope to be produced by photoreactions on nickel and was too strong for being assigned to any impurity, it was suspected that this might belong to Co63 .” Chemical separations were performed to confirm the activity was due to cobalt.
Discovery of the Cobalt Isotopes
Let us take the structure Cu(L1)/Al(L2)/Co(L3)/Al(L4)/Cu, which represents of itself the magnetic layer of cobalt placed inside of the neutron resonator Cu/Al/Cu.
Oscillating magnetic induction defined by neutron reflection
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