clothes pin

Definitions

  • Homespun clothes were seldom discarded. The many pins, needles, and thimbles found reveal that mending was a never-ending chore for the busy housewife
    Homespun clothes were seldom discarded. The many pins, needles, and thimbles found reveal that mending was a never-ending chore for the busy housewife
  • WordNet 3.6
    • n clothes pin wood or plastic fastener; for holding clothes on a clothesline
    • ***

Additional illustrations & photos:

Amy capped the climax by putting a clothes-pin on her nose Amy capped the climax by putting a clothes-pin on her nose

Usage

In literature:

Get ten small toy ten-pins or use wooden clothes pins.
"Games For All Occasions" by Mary E. Blain
As Mr. Opp gazed helplessly about the room, his eyes fell upon something white pinned to the red table-cloth.
"Mr. Opp" by Alice Hegan Rice
The first I seen was when I was shuckin' corn at the corn pin (crib) a man come up in gray clothes.
"Slave Narratives: A Folk History of Slavery in the United States from Interviews with Former Slaves, Arkansas Narratives, Part 4" by Work Projects Administration
Send me, please, a dozen clothes pins, to keep my washing on the tent-ropes.
"At Plattsburg" by Allen French
As I passed this party, I saw behind the lady's chair a maid, with a clothes-pin in her hand, and no nose.
"Aunt Jo's Scrap-Bag VI" by Louisa M. Alcott
The clothes may be pinned to the side of the bed.
"Scouting For Girls, Official Handbook of the Girl Scouts" by Girl Scouts
We took off our bonnets, and pinned them by the strings to the walls of the tent, which were of the best tow-cloth I ever saw out of Vermont.
"Phemie Frost's Experiences" by Ann S. Stephens
He had found the envelope pinned to the tent-cloth when he rode up, weary and grim, from his journey to Meander.
"Claim Number One" by George W. (George Washington) Ogden
Each of the more imaginative passengers insured his life by fastening the ticket to his clothes with a safety-pin.
"With the French in France and Salonika" by Richard Harding Davis
The cloth parted, sliding down his arms and pinning his hands together.
"The Cartels Jungle" by Irving E. Cox, Jr.
Up Clothes-Pin Row, the wives and babies of troopers waited in little groups.
"The Plow-Woman" by Eleanor Gates
His visible clothing consisted of a man's coat, cut short at the sleeves and pinned across the breast.
"Little Aliens" by Myra Kelly
The lady visitor had pinned a rose in her hair, and the other little boy had been dressed in his prettiest clothes.
"The Child's Book of American Biography" by Mary Stoyell Stimpson
The cloth was moved forward on the pins, and the seam continued.
"The Invention of the Sewing Machine" by Grace Rogers Cooper
A diamond pin sparkled in his neck-tie, and his well-cut clothing testified to his complete solvency.
"The Competitive Nephew" by Montague Glass
Helen set the baby down on the floor, and the pan of clothes-pins beside her.
"Harper's Round Table, June 4, 1895" by Various
The gorget, or throat cloth, was still in general use, and it was attached to the hair by very elaborate-headed pins.
"English Costume" by Dion Clayton Calthrop
And how long hev yew bin promisin' to whittle me them clothes-pins?
"A Man in the Open" by Roger Pocock
Make the clothes-pin gold, with a black head, and then I'll show you what to do next.
"The Master's Violin" by Myrtle Reed
How long is it since you have fastened your cloths down with safety pins?
"In Paradise" by Paul Heyse
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In poetry:

“And I am Vidrik Verlandson;
For clothes bright iron I wear:
Stand’st thou not up on thy long, long legs,
I’ll pin thee down to thy lair:
"Vidrik Verlandson (From The Old Danish) " by George Borrow

In news:

Arlier this year, I was on a flight from New York to Dallas, and found myself sitting next to an older couple who sported 9/11-related pins on their clothing.
They wore a clothes pin apron.
With a heart hastily cut out of black cloth pinned to her dress, Evelyn Ruddock stood outside Madden's Funeral Home and patted her bulging belly to soothe the child waiting to be born.
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