circle

Definitions

  • A circle of fairies fly around a star; a bird looks on
    A circle of fairies fly around a star; a bird looks on
  • WordNet 3.6
    • v circle form a circle around "encircle the errors"
    • v circle travel around something "circle the globe"
    • v circle move in circles
    • n circle movement once around a course "he drove an extra lap just for insurance"
    • n circle any circular or rotating mechanism "the machine punched out metal circles"
    • n circle a curved section or tier of seats in a hall or theater or opera house; usually the first tier above the orchestra "they had excellent seats in the dress circle"
    • n circle street names for flunitrazepan
    • n circle a road junction at which traffic streams circularly around a central island "the accident blocked all traffic at the rotary"
    • n circle an unofficial association of people or groups "the smart set goes there","they were an angry lot"
    • n circle ellipse in which the two axes are of equal length; a plane curve generated by one point moving at a constant distance from a fixed point "he calculated the circumference of the circle"
    • n circle something approximating the shape of a circle "the chairs were arranged in a circle"
    • ***

Additional illustrations & photos:

SHADOW-CIRCLES INDICATING THE APPROACH TO THE POLE SHADOW-CIRCLES INDICATING THE APPROACH TO THE POLE
sewing circle sewing circle
She found sitting round her a whole circle of cats She found sitting round her a whole circle of cats

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
  • Interesting fact: The United States has paved enough roads to circle the Earth over 150 times.
    • Circle A circular group of persons; a ring.
    • Circle A company assembled, or conceived to assemble, about a central point of interest, or bound by a common tie; a class or division of society; a coterie; a set. "As his name gradually became known, the circle of his acquaintance widened."
    • Circle (Logic) A form of argument in which two or more unproved statements are used to prove each other; inconclusive reasoning. "That heavy bodies descend by gravity; and, again, that gravity is a quality whereby a heavy body descends, is an impertinent circle and teaches nothing."
    • Circle A plane figure, bounded by a single curve line called its circumference, every part of which is equally distant from a point within it, called the center.
    • Circle A round body; a sphere; an orb. "It is he that sitteth upon the circle of the earth."
    • Circle A series ending where it begins, and repeating itself. "Thus in a circle runs the peasant's pain."
    • Circle A territorial division or district.
    • Circle (Astron) An instrument of observation, the graduated limb of which consists of an entire circle.
    • Circle Compass; circuit; inclosure. "In the circle of this forest."
    • Circle Indirect form of words; circumlocution. "Has he given the lie,
      In circle , or oblique, or semicircle."
    • Circle The line that bounds such a figure; a circumference; a ring.
    • Circle To encompass, as by a circle; to surround; to inclose; to encircle. "Their heads are circled with a short turban.""So he lies, circled with evil."
    • Circle To move around; to revolve around. "Other planets circle other suns."
    • v. i Circle To move circularly; to form a circle; to circulate. "Thy name shall circle round the gaping through."
    • ***
Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
  • Interesting fact: Everyday, U.S. business use enough paper to circle the Earth over 20 times
    • n circle In elementary geom., a plane figure whose periphery is everywhere equally distant from a point within it, the center; in modern geom., the periphery of such a figure; a circumference.
    • n circle A circular formation or arrangement; a circlet; a ring: as, a circle of stones or of lights.
    • n circle A round body; a sphere; an orb.
    • n circle Circuit; course.
    • n circle Compass; inclosure.
    • n circle Something conceived as analogous to a circle; specifically, a number of persons intimately related to a central interest, person, or event; hence, a number of persons associated by any tie; a coterie; a set: as, a circle of ideas; to move in the higher circles of society; the circles of fashion; the family circle.
    • n circle A series ending where it begins, and perpetually repeated.
    • n circle A complete system, involving several subordinate divisions: as, the circle of the sciences.
    • n circle Circumlocution; indirect form of speech.
    • n circle In logic, an inconclusive form of argument, in which two or more unproved statements, or their equivalents, are used to prove each other: often called a vicious circle, or argument in a circle.
    • n circle The English equivalent of the name given in some countries, as in Germany, to certain administrative divisions.
    • n circle In astronomy and geodesy, a piece of metal or glass with lines engraved upon it so as to form graduations dividing the circumference of a circle into equal parts; hence, any instrument of which such a graduated circle forms the part that is most important or most difficult to make.
    • n circle A small shuttle made in the form of a horseshoe, and moving in a circular path. It is a French improvement on the simple swivel, and is used in tissue-weaving to form figures on the surface of a fabric.
    • n circle In geography, a small circle the plane of which is perpendicular to the axis of the earth; a circle of the globe parallel to the equator: more usually called a parallel of latitude.
    • n circle A line showing the hour on a sun-dial.
    • n circle A circle of declination: referred to as the two-hour circle, etc., especially as the six-hour circle.
    • circle To encircle; encompass; surround; inclose.
    • circle To move around; revolve around.
    • circle To make to move in a circle or to revolve.
    • circle To move in a round or circle; circulate; revolve or turn circularly.
    • circle To form a circle; assume or have the form of a circle.
    • n circle A bookbinders' wheel-shaped tool, having a design engraved on the rim or edge.
    • n circle A circle of communicating arterioles on the sclerotic surrounding the optic nerve.
    • n circle A ring of fibrocartilage which gives support to the auriculoventricular valve on each side of the heart. Also called circulus callosus Halleri.
    • n circle The circumcircle of the triangle of similitude of three figures directly similar.
    • n circle Second Lemoine circle. Same as cosine circle.
    • n circle In gearing, the pitch-circle.
    • n circle In surgery, the passage of chyme, after gastro-enterostomy, through the artificial opening into the intestine, and then its regurgitation, in consequence of antiperistaltic action, through the pylorus back into the stomach.
    • n circle The mutually accelerating action of two independent but coexisting diseases.
    • ***
Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
  • Interesting fact: It takes about 20 seconds for a red blood cell to circle the whole body.
    • n Circle sėr′kl a plane figure bounded by one line every point of which is equally distant from a certain point called the centre: the line which bounds the figure: a ring: a planet's orbit: a series ending where it began: a figure in magic; a company surrounding the principal person: those of a certain class or society
    • v.t Circle to move round: to encompass
    • v.i Circle to move in a circle: to stand in a circle
    • ***

Quotations

  • Marquis De Vauvenargues
    Marquis%20De%20Vauvenargues
    “Most people grow old within a small circle of ideas, which they have not discovered for themselves. There are perhaps less wrong-minded people than thoughtless.”
  • Nicholas Goodison
    Nicholas Goodison
    “The inventor of the Xerox machine will, I am sure, find a special place reserved for him on one of the inner circles of Dante's Inferno.”
  • Albert Schweitzer
    Albert%20Schweitzer
    “Until he extends his circle of compassion to include all living things, man will not himself find peace.”
  • Aldous Huxley
    Aldous%20Huxley
    “Specialized meaninglessness has come to be regarded, in certain circles, as a kind of hall-mark of true science.”
  • Flora Edwards
    Flora Edwards
    “In helping others, we shall help ourselves, for whatever good we give out completes the circle and comes back to us.”
  • Richard Brinsley Sheridan
    Richard%20Brinsley%20Sheridan
    “When of a gossiping circle it was asked, What are they doing? The answer was, Swapping lies.”

Idioms

Circle the drain - If someone is circling the drain, they are spiraling downward to a usually inevitable death.
***
Circle the wagons - (USA) If you circle the wagons, you stop communicating with people who don't think the same way as you to avoid their ideas. It can also mean to bring everyone together to defend a group against an attack.
***
Circling the drain - If someone is circling the drain, they are very near death and have little time to live. The phrase can also describe a project or plan or campaign that that is on the brink of failure.
***
Does a one-legged duck swim in circles? - (USA) (US Southern) This is a response given to an unnecessary question for which the obvious answer is yes. Example: If you were to ask an Olympic archer whether she could put an arrow in an apple at ten yards, she could answer: "Does a one-legged duck swim in circles?"('Do one-legged ducks swim in circles?' is also used.)
***
Full circle - When something has come full circle, it has ended up where it started.
***
Go round in circles - If people are going round in circles, they keep discussing the same thing without reaching any agreement or coming to a conclusion.
***
Ninth circle of hell - In Dante's Inferno, the ninth circle of hell is the centre where the worst punishments are found, so it is used idiomatically for something that couldn't get worse.
***
Run circles around someone - If you can run circles around someone, you are smarter and intellectually quicker than they are.
***
Sharks are circling - If the sharks are circling, then something is in danger and its enemies are getting ready for the kill.
***
Square the circle - When someone is squaring the circle, they are trying to do something impossible.
***
Vicious circle - A vicious circle is a sequence of events that make each other worse- someone drinks because they are unhappy at work, then loses their job... 'Vicious cycle' is also used.
***
Vultures are circling - If the vultures are circling, then something is in danger and its enemies are getting ready for the kill.
***

Etymology

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
OE. cercle, F. cercle, fr. L. circulus,Whence also AS. circul,), dim. of circus, circle, akin to Gr. kri`kos ki`rkos, circle, ring. Cf. Circus Circum-

Usage

In literature:

Gold-band, the next finger, wore a golden circle round his waist.
"Fairy Tales of Hans Christian Andersen" by Hans Christian Andersen
The ellipse may be nearly a circle, it may be absolutely a circle, or it may be something quite different from a circle.
"The Story of the Heavens" by Robert Stawell Ball
There were dark half circles under her eyes, pinch lines about her mouth, all her face was wildly strained.
"Desert Dust" by Edwin L. Sabin
The dark, evil-smelling interior was lit only by the smouldering embers of a small wood-fire in the centre of the great circle.
"The Watchers of the Plains" by Ridgewell Cullum
By dark they all came back and sat around in a circle, the way people in the wilds sit around a campfire.
"Eight Keys to Eden" by Mark Irvin Clifton
Rocks just under water are shown by a cross surrounded by a dotted circle; rocks above water, by a dotted circle with dots inside it.
"Lectures in Navigation" by Ernest Gallaudet Draper
When I first set eyes upon the colonel, he was in the centre of a circle of tooth-pickers, who had just issued from the supper-room.
"The Wild Huntress" by Mayne Reid
Berthold Hartmann has studied the childish circle of thought, by means of a series of experiments.
"Introduction to the Science of Sociology" by Robert E. Park
With a radius of three and one-half inches describe a circle.
"Construction Work for Rural and Elementary Schools" by Virginia McGaw
Sophia saw circles and triangles and whole constellations flying across the room.
"The Saracen: The Holy War" by Robert Shea
Averting his gaze and circling wide of the body, Old Crompton made for the table of the marvelous rays.
"Astounding Stories of Super-Science February 1930" by Various
The second circle was made up of the older and better-known warriors.
"The Road to Frontenac" by Samuel Merwin
His eyes grew used to the light and he saw that he stood at the edge of a pool full of fish swimming in circles.
"Shaman" by Robert Shea
Then in the distance he detected the piercing light from a dark lantern moving in a circle, searching every nook and cranny.
"The Web of the Golden Spider" by Frederick Orin Bartlett
Kid, you circle to the right.
"Out of the Depths" by Robert Ames Bennet
Once off the Point, where the tide rip is strong, he began to circle in great, wide circles.
"Tales of Fishes" by Zane Grey
The balance of the frightful herd was now circling rapidly and with bewildering speed about the little knot of victims.
"The Gods of Mars" by Edgar Rice Burroughs
I got out my compass and a match and found that I had been circling, as one is sure to do in the dark.
"Boy Scouts Handbook" by Boy Scouts of America
The circle of them is not so great as some imagine; the influence of a few have tainted many who are not naturally corrupt.
"The Writings Of Thomas Paine, Complete" by Thomas Paine
A given straight line being viewed as equal in length to the circumference of a circle, he sought to find the diameter of the circle.
"Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 6, Slice 4" by Various
***

In poetry:

A gull circles over
The waves with a scream,
Far out we discover
Hven Island in mist like a dream.
"The Drive" by Adam Gottlob Oehlenschlaeger
A bed sorrow-circled,
And a pale dying daughter there,
With lustreless eye
And tresses of tangled hair.
"Wishing" by Edwin Arnold
Queer, how you stalk and prowl the air
In circles and evasions, enveloping me,
Ghoul on wings
Winged Victory.
"The Mosquito" by D H Lawrence
In his splendour let the sun
Drop into his ocean bed:
He again his race shall run,
Glory circling round his head.
"Evening" by John Bowring
Love me. I care not what the circling years
To me may do.
If, but in spite of time and tears,
You prove but true.
"Love's Apotheosis" by Paul Laurence Dunbar
And mingles,—circling, wreathing,
In moonlight opaline,
While through the zephyr's harping
Tinkles the mandoline.
"Mandoline" by Paul Verlaine

In news:

NEW YORK — Sheila Birnbaum is known in legal circles across New York as the "queen of torts" for her prowess in sorting out complicated cases.
Sheila Birnbaum is known in legal circles across New York as the "queen of torts" for her prowess in sorting out complicated cases.
4 Steps to Conceal Undereye Circles.
In a quest to hide her dark undereye circles, 27-year-old Dhara Naik has spent hundreds of dollars on concealers.
Concentric circles widen after job loss in "Company Men".
Neil LaPine is led to a police cruiser by Hagerstown City Police Sgt John Lehman after he barricaded himself inside a Little Hayden Circle home on Friday.
Roundabouts, traffic circles in El Paso Roundabouts.
Congenital Heart Walk in Cleveland's University Circle is set for Saturday.
Join the Children's Heart Foundation and the Adult Congenital Heart Association for the second Northern Ohio Congenital Heart Walk, Oct 6 at Wade Park Oval in Cleveland's University Circle.
Drum circle at First Congregational Church.
Drum circle at First Congregational Church .
Designer Ondine Karady in her Logan Circle condo with her blue chow, Little Bear.
Metabo CIRCLE 122 on inquiry card.
With the 9/11 Anniversary, Political Correctness Comes Full Circle.
The Columbia Association headquarters has been on Wincopin Circle overlooking Lake Kittamaqundi in downtown Columbia since 1992.
***

In science:

Fig. 4 shows the comparison between the energy linearities, the mean values of E /Ebeam , obtained using the iteration procedure with ǫ = 0.1% (black circles) and the first approximation of energy (open circles).
Hadron Energy Reconstruction for the ATLAS Barrel Prototype Combined Calorimeter in the Framework of the Non-parametrical Method
Energy linearity as a function of the beam energy for the e/h method obtained using the iteration procedure with ǫ = 0.1% (black circles) and the first approximation (open circles).
Hadron Energy Reconstruction for the ATLAS Barrel Prototype Combined Calorimeter in the Framework of the Non-parametrical Method
Figure 5: The fractional energy resolutions obtained with the e/h method (black circles), and the first approximation (open circles).
Hadron Energy Reconstruction for the ATLAS Barrel Prototype Combined Calorimeter in the Framework of the Non-parametrical Method
Figure 7: Energy linearity as a function of the beam energy for the e/h method (black circles) and the cells weighting H1 method (open circles).
Hadron Energy Reconstruction for the ATLAS Barrel Prototype Combined Calorimeter in the Framework of the Non-parametrical Method
The open circles in the upper panel are measurements of the circular velocity determined from the emission line at 5007 ˚A while the filled circles measure the stellar rotation derived from the absorption lines.
Disc heating in NGC 2985
All of the bound-states in the chain can be seen as the M2-M5 bound-state on an electric circle and a transverse circle.
Open Branes in Space-Time Non-Commutative Little String Theory
Thus, as already mentioned in Section 3.2, this is interpreted [3, 4] as the fact that the NCOS open string in 4+1 dimensions is an open membrane in 5+1 dimensions wrapped on the electric circle of radius ˜RE , and for strong coupling the electric circle is large and we flow into decompactified OM theory.
Open Branes in Space-Time Non-Commutative Little String Theory
In [Um] intrinsic circle systems were defined on the whole circle S 1 .
Sextactic points on a simple closed curve
A point on ˆγ is called an inflection point if the osculating circle at that point is a great circle.
Sextactic points on a simple closed curve
Then Cj is a great circle which is an osculating circle of ˆγ at tj .
Sextactic points on a simple closed curve
Here we show (open circles) a series for increasing β (decreasing temperature) and (filled circles) a series for decreasing β .
Phase Behavior of a Simple Model for Membrane Proteins
We performed two sets of integrations, one where we increased β step-wise (empty circles in the figure), and one in the opposite sense (filled circles).
Phase Behavior of a Simple Model for Membrane Proteins
The solid line, open circles and full circles correspond to χ′′ref , χ′′wait (cooling) and χ′′wait (reheating), respectively.
Numerical Study of Aging in the Generalized Random Energy Model
The open circles and the full circles correspond to the cooling and the reheating data, respectively.
Numerical Study of Aging in the Generalized Random Energy Model
The solid line, open circles and full circles correspond to χ′′ref , χ′′wait (cooling) and χ′′wait (reheating), respectively.
Numerical Study of Aging in the Generalized Random Energy Model
***