cerium

Definitions

  • WordNet 3.6
    • n cerium a ductile grey metallic element of the lanthanide series; used in lighter flints; the most abundant of the rare-earth group
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Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
    • n Cerium (Chem) A rare metallic element, occurring in the minerals cerite, allanite, monazite, etc. Symbol Ce. Atomic weight 141.5. It resembles iron in color and luster, but is soft, and both malleable and ductile. It tarnishes readily in the air.
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Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
    • n cerium Chemical symbol, Ce; atomic weight, 141.5; specific gravity, 5.5. A metal discovered in 1803 by Klaproth, Hisinger, and Berzelius independently. It is a powder of lamellar texture, malleable, of a color between that of iron and that of lead, and acquires a metallic luster by pressure. It becomes bright by polishing, but soon tarnishes in the air. It does not occur native, but exists in combination in the mineral cerite, in which it was first found, as also in allanite, gadolinite, and some others.
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Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • n Cerium sē′ri-um a rare metal found in the mineral Cē′rite, which is its hydrated silicate.
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Etymology

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
Named by Berzelius in 1803 from the asteroid Ceres, then just discovered (1801)
Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
Named from the plant Ceres.

Usage

In literature:

How much thorium, not to speak of cerium, could they take at a maximum.
"Tono Bungay" by H. G. Wells
Oxide of Cerium, C^{2}O^{3}.
"A System of Instruction in the Practical Use of the Blowpipe" by Anonymous
Cerium gets its name from the Roman goddess of agriculture by way of the asteroid.
"Creative Chemistry" by Edwin E. Slosson
Mantles are made by knitting cylinders of cotton or of other fiber and soaking these in a solution of the nitrates of cerium and thorium.
"Artificial Light" by M. Luckiesh
Thus C stands for carbon, Cl for chlorine, Cd for cadmium, Ce for cerium, Cb for columbium.
"An Elementary Study of Chemistry" by William McPherson
Welsbach mantles consist of about 99 per cent thorium oxide and 1 per cent cerium oxide.
"The Economic Aspect of Geology" by C. K. Leith
The rare metals cerium, lauthanum, and didymium have been lately investigated by Drs.
"The Galaxy, Volume 23, No. 2, February, 1877" by Various
Cerous sulphide, Ce2S3, results on heating cerium with sulphur or cerium oxide in carbon bisulphide vapour.
"Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 5, Slice 7" by Various
Oxalate of cerium was highly recommended.
"Psychotherapy" by James J. Walsh
Iridium and Osmium discovered by Tenant, and Cerium by Berzelius.
"The Progress of Invention in the Nineteenth Century." by Edward W. Byrn
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In news:

Doped cerium oxide materials, long valued and mass produced for catalysis, are now being applied to solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) and other electrochemical devices like electrochemical oxygen generators (ECOGs).
Rare earth metals such as cerium and tantalum are needed to make everything from iPods and hybrid car batteries to wind turbines.
With a small drill attachment and a tub of cerium oxide compound (and for deep scratches , some sandpaper), it is possible to grind scratches out of a screen, the same way you would buff scratches out of auto glass.
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In science:

Another candidate are heavy-fermion superconductors, where spinorbit scattering often happens to be strong owing to the presence of elements with large atomic weights such as uranium and cerium.
Symmetry Classes
Sarrao JL and Thompson JD (2007) Superconductivity in cerium- and plutonium-based ‘115’ materials. J.
Magnetism and superconductivity driven by identical 4$f$ states in a heavy-fermion metal
The small value of the magnetic moment on Cerium sites m = 0.15µB (µB is the Bohr magneton) oriented along the c-tetragonal axis indicated that the ordering is of itinerant origin.
Field-Induced Spin-Exciton Condensation in dx2-y2-wave Superconducting CeCoIn5
The discovery of the 35 cerium isotopes presently known is discussed.
Discovery of the Cerium Isotopes
Cerium isotopes as a function of time they were discovered.
Discovery of the Cerium Isotopes
As a first element we present the discovery of cerium isotopes.
Discovery of the Cerium Isotopes
According to the latest HFB model 115Ce is predicted to be the lightest and 194Ce the heaviest particle-bound cerium isotope.
Discovery of the Cerium Isotopes
Figure A summarizes the year of first discovery for all cerium isotopes identified by the production method.
Discovery of the Cerium Isotopes
The neutron-rich cerium isotopes were discovered in fission following irradiations in reactors (RF), or spontaneous fission (SF), and more recently projectile fragmentation or projectile fission (PF).
Discovery of the Cerium Isotopes
In the following the discovery of each cerium isotope is discussed in detail.
Discovery of the Cerium Isotopes
The Cerium activities were produced by 100-150 MeV proton bombardment of lanthanum in (p,xn) reactions at Orsay, France.
Discovery of the Cerium Isotopes
In the paper New Neutron-Deficient Isotope of Cerium where Ware and Wiig speculated about the observation of 131Ce, they reported the discovery of 132Ce in .
Discovery of the Cerium Isotopes
The stable isotope 136Ce was discovered by Dempster from the University of Chicago in his 1936 paper “The Isotopic Constitution of Barium and Cerium” .
Discovery of the Cerium Isotopes
The stable isotope 138Ce was discovered by Dempster from the University of Chicago in the same 1936 paper The Isotopic Constitution of Barium and Cerium where he also observed 136Ce.
Discovery of the Cerium Isotopes
Ce was identified in 1953 by Caretto and Katcoff, at Brookhaven National Laboratory in the paper entitles Short-Lived Cerium Isotopes from Uranium Fission . 146Ce was produced from irradiation of uranyl nitrate and decay curves were measured with an end-window Geiger tube.
Discovery of the Cerium Isotopes
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