carnation

Definitions

  • WordNet 3.6
    • adj carnation pink or pinkish
    • n carnation a pink or reddish-pink color
    • n carnation Eurasian plant with pink to purple-red spice-scented usually double flowers; widely cultivated in many varieties and many colors
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Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
    • Carnation (Bot) A species of Dianthus Dianthus Caryophyllus) or pink, having very beautiful flowers of various colors, esp. white and usually a rich, spicy scent.
    • Carnation The natural color of flesh; rosy pink. "Her complexion of the delicate carnation ."
    • Carnation (Paint) Those parts of a picture in which the human body or any part of it is represented in full color; the flesh tints. "The flesh tints in painting are termed carnations ."
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Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
    • n carnation Flesh-color; pink.
    • n carnation In painting, the representation of flesh; the nude or undraped parts of a figure.
    • n carnation In botany: The common name of the pink Dianthus Caryophyllus, a native of southern Europe, but cultivated from very ancient times for its fragrance and beauty. Under cultivation, in place of the original lilacpurple of the wild state, it has assumed a wide variety of tints, and numberless combinations of form and color. These varieties are grouped by florists into three classes, viz., bizarres, flakes, and picotees. Also called carnation pink.
    • n carnation The Cæsalpinia pulcherrima, the Spanish carnation, a leguminous shrub with very showy flowers, often cultivated in tropical regions. Also formerly, by corruption, coronation.
    • n carnation Incarnation.
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Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • n Carnation kar-nā′shun flesh-colour: one of the finest of florists' flowers, a double-flowering variety of the clove pink, and existing only in a state of cultivation
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Etymology

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
F. carnation, the flesh tints in a painting, It carnagione, fr. L. carnatio, fleshiness, fr. caro, carnis, flesh. See Carnal
Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
L. carnatio, fleshiness.

Usage

In literature:

A slim, tall man, of eight or nine and twenty, stood looking at that face in the morning light; he had just given her the carnations.
"A Vanished Hand" by Sarah Doudney
The Pink or Pincke was, as now, the name of the smaller sorts of Carnations, and was generally applied to the single sorts.
"The plant-lore and garden-craft of Shakespeare" by Henry Nicholson Ellacombe
You might arrange those carnations in the vase if you will, while I attend to the cooking.
"Hepsey Burke" by Frank Noyes Westcott
All ornament them, here and there, with roses, pinks, and carnations.
"Le Morvan, [A District of France,] Its Wild Sports, Vineyards and Forests; with Legends, Antiquities, Rural and Local Sketches" by Henri de Crignelle
This man possessed the western, as the company under the name of the Nabob of Arcot does the eastern, division of the Carnatic.
"Library of the World's Best Literature, Ancient and Modern, Vol. 7" by Various
She selected roses and carnations, and, bringing them in, arranged them in vases in the room.
"The School Queens" by L. T. Meade
CARNATION, bud-variation in, i.
"The Variation of Animals and Plants Under Domestication, Volume II (of 2)" by Charles Darwin
The scent of carnations was now faintly blended with the deeper fragrance of the single rose behind her ear.
"The Education of Eric Lane" by Stephen McKenna
The decorations of pink carnations were but moderately admired by her undistinguished guests.
"Punch, or the London Charivari, Vol. 147, November 18, 1914" by Various
All the carnations are superb, and in the Darmstadt picture the infant Christ wears a sweet and happy smile.
"Holbein" by Beatrice Fortescue
But I am content with one, with the carnate symbol of them, with you, and though you be cold and cruel.
"The Book of Khalid" by Ameen Rihani
Her flowers had been carnations, and only two dozen of them, at that.
"The Dominant Strain" by Anna Chapin Ray
Carnations had succeeded the violets, then a single rose.
"Highacres" by Jane Abbott
Oh, Isabel, where did you get these beautiful carnations?
"The Lamplighter" by Maria S. Cummins
Fancy long stem red Carnations cost 75 cts.
"Garden and Forest Weekly, Volume 1 No. 1, February 29, 1888" by Various
But white carnations are a symbol of death.
"The Star Lord" by Boyd Ellanby
He adjusted the fragrant carnation on his lapel in the large wall mirror, not entirely displeased with what it reflected.
"Forsyte's Retreat" by Winston Marks
CARNATIONS are of two types, the outdoor or garden varieties, and the indoor or forcing kinds.
"The Practical Garden-Book" by C. E. Hunn
He dressed, took a carnation from the bouquet, and went down.
"Problematic Characters" by Friedrich Spielhagen
Lilly had placed a gladiolus plant in the punch bowl and stuck pink carnations back of the box containing the lamp shade.
"The Song of Songs" by Hermann Sudermann
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In poetry:

Awaking from soft slumber
The rare rich things I dreamed,
The rose and the carnation,
To have upon me streamed.
"The Eternal Infant" by Manmohan Ghose
More sweet than the carnation,
More rich than rose to me.
The flower that gems creation,
Thy flower called Emily.
"The Eternal Infant" by Manmohan Ghose
There were no poppies or carnations,
Hardly a greenish lily, watery faint.
Green, dim, invisible flourishing of vines
Royally gesticulate.
"Grapes" by D H Lawrence
God forgive you, girl, and bless you! Let no line of mine distress you –
I am sorry for the bitter lines I wrote;
But remember, and think kindly, for we met and married blindly,
When I wore a pink carnation in my coat.
"The Pink Carnation" by Henry Lawson
Now it bursts. Now it has been announced.
Now it is being soaked up by newspapers.
Now it is running through the streets.
The crowd has it. The woman selling carnations
And the man in the straw hat stand with it in their shoes.
"The Assassination" by Donald Justice
We creep to our bed, and its straw mattress.
We wait; we listen.
The storm lulls off, then redoubles,
Bending the trees half-way down to the ground,
Shaking loose the last wizened oranges in the orchard,
Flattening the limber carnations.
"The Storm" by Theodore Roethke

In news:

Curiosity got the best of me when I saw this recipe for "Carnation Summer Salad" in a 1954 recipe book.
Students present veterans with carnations.
If Husker fans regard Pasadena as a big red rose, some apparently view Indianapolis more like a carnation.
In 1960 there were two movies, Oscar Wilde with Robert Morley and The Trials of Oscar Wilde with Peter Finch, the latter based on John Furnell's stage play, The Green Carnation.
Rip-roaring Carnation Fourth of July.
The country dancers were among award winning entries in the annual Carnation Fourth parade.
A pickup truck was a symbol of American simplicity, and Marty Robbins sang his hit song, "White Sport Coat and a Pink Carnation" in 1957.
Howard Turney , 83, of Carnation, dies.
Howard Lee Turney , 83, of Carnation died Monday, March 26, at Evergreen Hospital.
Birthright Volunteers "Satch" Booth-Rosage, Bonnie Johnson, Leah Young, Terri McConnell, Rosie Clark and Maureen Clark prepare carnations for Birthright 's Mother's Day Celebration.
2007 Carnation Festival Balloon Liftoff .
Nestl Carnation Malted Milk .
3-on-3 basketball tourney returns to Carnation.
She may pick up a tailored carnation from the Le Mars Flower House, pizza from Pizza Hut in Le Mars and car wash from Easy Clean car wash.
The workshops will be held 6:30-9:30 pm Thursday and 9 am – 4 pm Saturday in Issaquah and Carnation.
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