camelopard

Definitions

  • WordNet 3.6
    • n camelopard tallest living quadruped; having a spotted coat and small horns and very long neck and legs; of savannahs of tropical Africa
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Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
    • n Camelopard (Zoöl) An African ruminant; the giraffe. See Giraffe.
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Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
    • n camelopard The giraffe: so called from a certain resemblance in form to a camel, and from its spotted coloration, like that of the pard or leopard.
    • n camelopard In heraldry, a bearing representing a creature like a giraffe, but with long and generally curved horns, borrowed from the medieval bestiaries. Also formerly camelopardal, camelopardel.
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Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • n Camelopard kam′el-ō-pärd or kam-el′ō-pärd the giraffe.
    • n Camelopard kam′el-ō-pärd or kam-el′ō-pärd, the giraffe.
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Etymology

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
LL. camelopardus, L. camelopardalus, camelopardalis, fr. Gr. kamhlopa`rdalis; ka`mhlos a camel + pa`rdalis pard, leopard: cf. F. camélopard,. The camelopard has a neck and head like a camel, and is spotted like a pard. See Camel, and Pard
Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
L.,—Gr. camēlopardalis; from Gr. kamēlos, the camel, and pardalis, the panther.

Usage

In literature:

I saw some mankind wolves, centaurs, tigers, leopards, hyenas, camelopardals, and orixes, or huge wild goats with sharp horns.
"Gargantua and Pantagruel, Complete." by Francois Rabelais
I saw some mankind wolves, centaurs, tigers, leopards, hyenas, camelopardals, and orixes, or huge wild goats with sharp horns.
"Gargantua and Pantagruel, Book V." by Francois Rabelais
Moreover, he killed rhinoceroses and a camelopard.
"Dio's Rome, Volume V., Books 61-76 (A.D. 54-211)" by Cassius Dio
Camelopard, or Giraffe, 264.
"The Mirror of Literature, Amusement, and Instruction" by Various
As a live camelopard has been sent to London and another to Paris, the history and habits of these animals have excited some interest.
"The Mirror of Literature, Amusement, and Instruction." by Various
There is here a fine giraffe, or camelopard, of an amazing height, stuffed.
"The Stranger in France" by John Carr
Before us stood, with their heads lifted high up, a troop of eighteen or twenty giraffes, or camelopards.
"My First Voyage to Southern Seas" by W.H.G. Kingston
The Camelopard is in the west of north, and getting upright.
"Half-Hours with the Stars" by Richard A. Proctor
And slender-straight camelopards the boughs Down-drew, the lush-green leaves thereon to browse.
"Lilith" by Ada Langworthy Collier
Instead of capturing camelopards alive, you might leave your bones to bleach upon the plain.
"The Giraffe Hunters" by Mayne Reid
The guanaco, a quadruped allied to the lama and with some resemblance to the camelopard, is found in considerable numbers.
"With the World's Great Travellers, Volume 1" by Various
Meanwhile the horses had been almost as much terrified by the sudden apparition of the monarchs of the forest, as the camelopard itself.
"Hair-Breadth Escapes" by H.C. Adams
The guanaco, a quadruped allied to the lama, and with some resemblance to the camelopard, is found in considerable numbers.
"The Captive in Patagonia" by Benjamin Franklin Bourne
A combat of camelopards and unicorns?
"The Strand Magazine, Vol. 27, No. 161, May 1904" by Various
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In poetry:

Arms, treasures, captives, kings in clanking chains
Urged on by trampling cohorts bronzed and scarred,
And wild-eyed wonders snared on Lybian plains,
Lion and ostrich and camelopard.
"For The Commemoration Services" by Oliver Wendell Holmes