callisthenics

Definitions

  • WordNet 3.6
    • n callisthenics light exercises designed to promote general fitness "several different calisthenics were illustrated in the video"
    • n callisthenics the practice of calisthenic exercises "calisthenics is recommended for general good health"
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Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
    • Callisthenics See Calisthenic Calisthenics.
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Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
    • n callisthenics The art or practice of exercising the muscles for the purpose of gaining health, strength, or grace of form and movement; a kind of light gymnastics. Also spelled calisthenics.
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Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • n.pl Callisthenics kal-is-then′iks exercises for the purpose of promoting gracefulness as well as strength of body
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Etymology

Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
Gr. kalos, beautiful, sthenos, strength.

Usage

In literature:

Hermolaus and his associates, among whom was Callisthenes, a pupil of Aristotle, were first tortured, and then put to death.
"A Smaller History of Greece" by William Smith
It was as if they met in a sort of mental gymnasium, fenced with one another, did callisthenics.
"The Real Adventure" by Henry Kitchell Webster
If the series of observations which Callisthenes sent to Aristotle, dating from B.C.
"The Seven Great Monarchies Of The Ancient Eastern World, Vol 1. (of 7): Chaldaea" by George Rawlinson
Accordingly, I return to Callisthenes and Philistus, in whom I see that you have been wallowing.
"The Letters of Cicero, Volume 1" by Marcus Tullius Cicero
Callisthenes, pseudo, 128, 129.
"A Literary History of the English People" by Jean Jules Jusserand
Callisthenes accompanies Alexander the Great in his campaigns, i.
"History of the Intellectual Development of Europe, Volume II (of 2)" by John William Draper
In this account Strabo, on the authority of Callisthenes and Callinus, confirms Herodotus.
"The Poetical Works of Sir Edward Bulwer Lytton, Bart. M.P." by Edward Bulwer Lytton
Some say that Callisthenes was crucified by order of Alexander for not having acknowledged him to be the son of Jupiter.
"A Philosophical Dictionary, Volume 1 (of 10)" by François-Marie Arouet (AKA Voltaire)
Alexander, weary of the din, called suddenly upon Callisthenes to speak in praise of the Greeks.
"The Golden Hope" by Robert H. Fuller
Dares Phrygius, Dictys Cretensis, the pseudo-Callisthenes supplied most of them.
"Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 11, Slice 2" by Various
On the other hand, there are Callisthenes, Onesicritus and Cleitarchus, whose tendency is rhetorical.
"Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 12, Slice 4" by Various
There could be if the Government would appoint a Callisthenes of their own and set the eager pen similarly to work.
"Punch, or the London Charivari, Vol. 150, June 21st, 1916" by Various
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