busk

Definitions

  • WordNet 3.6
    • v busk play music in a public place and solicit money for it "three young men were busking in the plaza"
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Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
    • n Busk bŭsk A thin, elastic strip of metal, whalebone, wood, or other material, worn in the front of a corset. "Her long slit sleeves, stiff busk , puff verdingall,
      Is all that makes her thus angelical."
    • n Busk bŭsk Among the Creek Indians, a feast of first fruits celebrated when the corn is ripe enough to be eaten. The feast usually continues four days. On the first day the new fire is lighted, by friction of wood, and distributed to the various households, an offering of green corn, including an ear brought from each of the four quarters or directions, is consumed, and medicine is brewed from snakeroot. On the second and third days the men physic with the medicine, the women bathe, the two sexes are taboo to one another, and all fast. On the fourth day there are feasting, dancing, and games.
    • Busk To go; to direct one's course. "Ye might have busked you to Huntly banks."
    • Busk To prepare; to make ready; to array; to dress. "Busk you, busk you, my bonny, bonny bride."
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Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
    • busk To get ready; prepare; equip; dress: as, to busk a fish-hook.
    • busk To use; employ.
    • busk To get ready and go; hasten; hurry.
    • n busk An obsolete form of bush.
    • busk To seek; hunt up and down; cast about; beat about.
    • busk Nautical, to beat to windward along a coast; cruise off and on.
    • n busk A stiffened body-garment, as a doublet, corset, or bodice.
    • n busk A flexible strip of wood, steel, whalebone, or other stiffening material, placed in the front of stays to keep them in form.
    • n busk An Indian feast of first fruits.
    • busk To cruise as a pirate.
    • busk To earn a livelihood by going about singing, playing, and selling ballads, or as an acrobat, juggler, etc., in public houses, steamboats, on the street, etc.
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Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • v.t., v.i Busk busk to prepare: to dress one's self.
    • n Busk busk the piece of bone, wood, or steel in the front of a woman's stays: a corset
    • v.i Busk busk (naut.) to cruise along a shore, to beat about: to seek.
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Etymology

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
F. busc, perh. fr. the hypothetical older form of E. bois, wood, because the first busks were made of wood. See Bush, and cf. OF. busche, F. bûche, a piece or log of wood, fr. the same root
Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
Prob. Sp. buscar, to seek.

Usage

In literature:

A number of these are given by Miss Busk in her interesting collection.
"Italian Popular Tales" by Thomas Frederick Crane
Farther on there were floors to lay, and I laid them, or fish-hooks to busk, and I busked them.
"The Dew of Their Youth" by S. R. Crockett
Many a crame must have been emptied ere such a number of manes and long tails could have been busked out.
"The Life of Mansie Wauch tailor in Dalkeith" by D. M. Moir
Any attempt at concealing pregnancy, by tight lacing and the application of a stronger busk, cannot be too severely condemned.
"The Physical Life of Woman:" by Dr. George H Napheys
Miss Busk gives a free adaptation rather than a translation of the German version, "Sagas," p. 315.
"The Science of Fairy Tales" by Edwin Sidney Hartland
Ye breed o' the herd's wife, ye busk at e'en.
"The Proverbs of Scotland" by Alexander Hislop
The story of Mr. Busk.
"The War in the Air; Vol. 1" by Walter Raleigh
The kynges bowmen buske them blyve.
"Ballads of Robin Hood and other Outlaws" by Frank Sidgwick
Busk you, my merry young men, Ye shall go with me!
"Fifteenth Century Prose and Verse" by Various
I am much indebted for specimens to the kindness of Mr. Busk.
"A Monograph on the Sub-class Cirripedia (Volume 1 of 2)" by Charles Darwin
They are clever, well-busked hizzies.
"The Men of the Moss-Hags" by S. R. Crockett
Both show the wooden contour of figure which was either the fault of the artist or of the iron busk of the wearer's stays.
"Women of America" by John Rouse Larus
Oh wherefore should I busk my head?
"Library of the World's Best Literature, Ancient and Modern, Vol. 15" by Various
The human remains examined by Busk are of precisely the same type as those of Denbighshire.
"Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 5, Slice 5" by Various
Miss Busk, of the Emporium, had grown more sour and more stately.
"The Martins Of Cro' Martin, Vol. II (of II)" by Charles James Lever
Christy, Falconer, Carpenter, and Busk went to France and examined the locality where the bone was found.
"A Manual of the Antiquity of Man" by J. P. MacLean
Each town celebrated its busk whenever the crops had come to maturity.
"Man, Past and Present" by Agustus Henry Keane
Turn to the left at the busk of 'Omer.
"The Burglars' Club" by Henry A. Hering
How can I busk a bonny bonny bride?
"English Songs and Ballads" by Various
Afi's wife sat plying her rock With outspread arms, busked to weave.
"Curiosities of Olden Times" by S. Baring-Gould
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In poetry:

"Busk and boun, my merry men all,
For ill dooms I do guess;
I canna look on that bonnie face,
As it lyes on the grass!"
"Edom O' Gordon" by Andrew Lang
"Busk and boun, my merry men a',
For ill dooms I do guess;
I canna luik in that bonnie face,
As it lies on the grass."--
"Edom O'Gordon" by Henry Morley
Jean, wha vogie, loo'd to busk aye
In her hame-spun, thrifty wark;
Now sells a' her braws for whisky
To her last gown, coat, and sark!
"Scotland's Scaith, Or, The History O' Will And Jean. Owre True A Tale. In Two Parts" by Hector MacNeill
Trig her house, and oh! to busk aye
Ilk sweet bairn was a' her pride!--
But at this time News and Whiskey
Sprang nae up at ilk road-side.
"Scotland's Scaith, Or, The History O' Will And Jean. Owre True A Tale. In Two Parts" by Hector MacNeill
"Hastily I will me busk," said the knight,
"Over the salt-e sea,
And see where Christ was quick and dead,
On the mount of Calvar-y.
Fare well, friend, and have good day,
It may no better be"--
"Robin Hood" by Henry Morley
Forgi'e, O forgi'e me, auld Scotlan', my mither!
Like an ill-deedie bairn I've ta'en up wi' anither;
And aft thy dear Doric aside I hae flung,
To busk oot my sang wi' the prood Southron tongue.
"A Plea For The Deric" by Janet Hamilton

In news:

Since their scrappy origins, busking in downtown Great Barrington, Mass.
Busk & Bard Festival in the spotlight.
Roxbury — For one expialidocious afternoon only, come to Hamboniest Hamlet of Roxbury on Saturday, Sept 1 for the most effervescent and almost everything Busk & Bard Street Performers Extravaganza.
A countertenor's journey from busking on the Metro to Carnegie Hall.
Two Charleston musical acts will go busking on downtown streets in the weeks leading up the Minus the Bear concert at the Music Farm on Thurs.
A countertenor 's journey from busking on the Metro to Carnegie Hall.
Peck the Town Crier is a former NYU jazz student turned street performer who busked his way through genres and across the country.
Now he's doing a different kind of busking getting the word out about The Nature Conservacy.
For Christian Busk, a 53-year-old landscape architect and preservationist, progress means honoring the past.
The warm weather and sunshine brings a flurry of people to Waynesville's downtown to enjoy the local fare — but it can also mean the beginning of busking season.
The Sisters Grimm busk their way to South Maui.
Busk & Bard Festival in the spotlight.
It's not uncommon stumble across many a "tanguero" busking for change across the capital city.
Jake Hyman of Freelance Whales talks about subway busking and road testing songs.
The 17-year-old lived in San Antonio for seven years before moving to Washington where he was discovered while busking in Seattle's Pike Place Market.
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