burnous

Definitions

  • WordNet 3.6
    • n burnous a long hooded cloak woven of wool in one piece; worn by Arabs and Moors
    • ***
Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
    • Burnous A cloaklike garment and hood woven in one piece, worn by Arabs.
    • Burnous A combination cloak and hood worn by women.
    • ***
Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • n Burnous bur-nōōs′ a mantle with a hood much worn by the Arabs.
    • ***

Etymology

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
Ar. burnus, a kind of high-crowned cap: cf. F. bournous, burnous, Sp. al-bornoz, a sort of upper garment, with a hood attached
Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
Fr.—Ar. burnus.

Usage

In literature:

Now he thrust it within his burnous.
"The Son of Tarzan" by Edgar Rice Burroughs
She gave a loving twist to his rose-colored top-knot, and bade him go and fetch her burnous.
"Roderick Hudson" by Henry James
Over his blue cloth jacket he had thrown a thin white burnous, which hung round him in classic folds.
"The Garden Of Allah" by Robert Hichens
The burnous, thus adjusted, made her look very young.
"The Woman With The Fan" by Robert Hichens
The Greek's white burnous fluttered on ahead, turning angle after angle, diving into dark alleys and shooting across open spaces.
"The River of Darkness" by William Murray Graydon
Maddened by the obstinacy of the animal, he seized hold of an old burnouse, and rushing up, threw it over its head.
"The Boy Slaves" by Mayne Reid
She answered by getting up, and he took the burnous off the log and folded it about her shoulders.
"Lippincott's Magazine, Vol. 26, August, 1880" by Various
She was dressed in her imposing white lace burnous.
"The German Classics of the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries" by Various
Maddened by the obstinacy of the animal, he seized hold of an old burnouse, and rushing up, threw it over its head.
"The Boy Slaves" by Mayne Reid
The Greek's white burnous fluttered on ahead, turning angle after angle, diving into dark alleys and shooting across open spaces.
"Guy in the Jungle" by William Murray Graydon
Here, you will be able to see poor Morrison's Arab, Burnouse, this morning.
"Draw Swords!" by George Manville Fenn
Wrapping himself in his burnous, he sat and waited until the Czar should come forth.
"The Green Book" by Mór Jókai
At the side of the column Rameses found his sword and burnous.
"The Pharaoh and the Priest" by Alexander Glovatski
The Maker of Sounds was garbed in an all-enveloping white burnous and a white skull cap.
"Fifty Contemporary One-Act Plays" by Various
I was just about to fall asleep when I felt a gentle pull at my burnous.
"The International Monthly, Vol. II, No. I" by Various
Charnock unrolled a burnous and a turban.
"Miranda of the Balcony" by A. E. W. (Alfred Edward Woodley) Mason
In the streets, the Arab's burnous and the turban of the Moor moved side by side with priestly robe and cowl of monk.
"Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine, Volume 63, No. 391, May, 1848" by Various
Upon the walls a few Spahis in scarlet and some white-burnoused Arabs were moving hurriedly.
"The Veiled Man" by William Le Queux
Several men were running towards me, their white burnouses flowing behind them.
"Zoraida" by William Le Queux
As I raised my hands, my loose burnouse fell from my arms, leaving them bare, and disclosing that they were white!
"Stolen Souls" by William Le Queux
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In poetry:

And many a bearded Bedouin draws back his
yellow-striped burnous
To gaze upon the Titan thews of him who was
thy paladin.
"The Sphinx" by Oscar Wilde