burlesque

Definitions

  • WordNet 3.6
    • adj burlesque relating to or characteristic of a burlesque "burlesque theater"
    • v burlesque make a parody of "The students spoofed the teachers"
    • n burlesque a composition that imitates or misrepresents somebody's style, usually in a humorous way
    • n burlesque a theatrical entertainment of broad and earthy humor; consists of comic skits and short turns (and sometimes striptease)
    • ***
Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
    • Burlesque A ludicrous imitation; a caricature; a travesty; a gross perversion. "Who is it that admires, and from the heart is attached to, national representative assemblies, but must turn with horror and disgust from such a profane burlesque and abominable perversion of that sacred institute?"
    • Burlesque An ironical or satirical composition intended to excite laughter, or to ridicule anything. "The dull burlesque appeared with impudence,
      And pleased by novelty in spite of sense."
    • Burlesque Ludicrous representation; exaggerated parody; grotesque satire. "Burlesque is therefore of two kinds; the first represents mean persons in the accouterments of heroes, the other describes great persons acting and speaking like the basest among the people."
    • a Burlesque Tending to excite laughter or contempt by extravagant images, or by a contrast between the subject and the manner of treating it, as when a trifling subject is treated with mock gravity; jocular; ironical. "It is a dispute among the critics, whether burlesque poetry runs best in heroic verse, like that of the Dispensary, or in doggerel, like that of Hudibras."
    • v. i Burlesque To employ burlesque.
    • v. t Burlesque To ridicule, or to make ludicrous by grotesque representation in action or in language. "They burlesqued the prophet Jeremiah's words, and turned the expression he used into ridicule."
    • ***
Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
    • burlesque Tending to excite laughter by a ludicrous contrast between the subject and the manner of treating it, as when a serious subject is treated ridiculously or a trifling one with solemnity.
    • n burlesque A burlesque literary or dramatic composition; travesty; caricature.
    • n burlesque A piece composed in burlesque style; a travesty; in modern use often specifically a theatrical piece, a kind of dramatic extravaganza, usually based upon a serious play or subject, with more or less music in it.
    • n burlesque A ludicrous or debasing caricature of any kind; a gross perversion.
    • n burlesque Synonyms Parody, Travesty, etc. See caricature.
    • burlesque To make ridiculous by mocking representation; caricature; travesty.
    • burlesque To use caricature.
    • ***
Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • n Burlesque bur-lesk′ a ludicrous representation—in speaking, acting, writing, drawing—a low and rude grade of the comic, whose legitimate office is to turn to laughter pretension and affectation
    • adj Burlesque jocular: comical
    • v.t Burlesque to turn into burlesque: to ridicule
    • ***

Etymology

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
F. burlesque, fr. It. burlesco, fr. burla, jest, mockery, perh. for burrula, dim. of L. burrae, trifles. See Bur

Usage

In literature:

They are interposed there as a break between burlesques, which is not the place for them.
"Adventures in the Arts" by Marsden Hartley
I have seen some burlesque verses in Greek by a Mr.
"The International Monthly Magazine, Volume 5, No. 1, January, 1852" by Various
Cecily caught her by the arm, a burlesque apprehension screwing her face up into a fantastically ugly mask.
"Tristram of Blent" by Anthony Hope
I know how you feel with an old cat for a landlady, and living up here on a side street with a lot of cheap burlesque people.
"The Easiest Way" by Eugene Walter and Arthur Hornblow
Margaret saw the boy's power of imitation was remarkable, and laughed heartily at his burlesque.
"A Voice in the Wilderness" by Grace Livingston Hill
But, amidst the fearful presages of War and Invasion, the affair had its lighter side, and provoked not a little of comedy and burlesque.
"Fragments of Two Centuries" by Alfred Kingston
But no relics could be found except some stone images so rudely cut as to be a burlesque upon Indian stone-cutting.
"Mexico and its Religion" by Robert A. Wilson
And now for a Story better than either Print: a story to which Mrs. Siddons' glorious name leads me, burlesque as it is.
"Letters of Edward FitzGerald to Fanny Kemble (1871-1883)" by Edward FitzGerald
At the same time, the very burlesque reassured her still more.
"The Three Cutters" by Captain Frederick Marryat
Seneca wrote a burlesque narrative of Claudian's death.
"Curiosities of Literature, Vol. 1 (of 3)" by Isaac D'Israeli
The burlesque turn of his mind mixt itself with the most serious subjects.
"The Best of the World's Classics, Restricted to Prose, Vol. IV (of X)--Great Britain and Ireland II" by Various
Nothing could be so perfectly burlesque, and we enjoyed it deeply and long.
"The Knickerbocker, or New-York Monthly Magazine, May 1844" by Various
We had planned a burlesque procession in which everybody was to take part.
"Old Rail Fence Corners" by Various
I remember how a burlesque composed by my eldest brother was once being rehearsed in my cousin's big drawing room.
"My Reminiscences" by Rabindranath Tagore
She carried it like a sabre at the slope, and her step was a burlesque of the cavalry stride.
"Despair's Last Journey" by David Christie Murray
The whole may be intended as a burlesque upon ostentatious and expensive funerals, which were then more customary than they are now.
"The Works of William Hogarth: In a Series of Engravings" by John Trusler
He burlesqued a sigh.
"The Highgrader" by William MacLeod Raine
The public imagined that I simply took a certain picture of a particular artist and burlesqued it.
"The Confessions of a Caricaturist, Vol 2 (of 2)" by Harry Furniss
To attach importance to it was a burlesque of justice.
"Sir Walter Ralegh" by William Stebbing
Give them a burlesque of opera.
"Lippincott's Magazine, Vol. 22, November, 1878" by Various
***

In poetry:

LENORE was a Saracen maiden,
Brunette, statuesque,
The reverse of grotesque,
Her pa was a bagman from Aden,
Her mother she played in burlesque.
"Sir Guy the Crusader" by William Schwenck Gilbert
Behind mock-ceremony of your grief
Lurked the burlesque instinct of the ham;
You never altered your amused belief
That life was a mere monumental sham.
"Dirge For A Joker" by Sylvia Plath

In news:

Old-Time Burlesque Gets a New Audience in Endicott.
" Burlesque , A Las Vegas Review" directed by John Penird will be performed Saturday at 8:00PM and Sunday at 3:00PM.
Q&A: Siren Santina, creative director and co-founder of Salomé Cabaret Burlesque Revue.
Creative director and co-founder of Salomé Cabaret Burlesque Revue, Siren Santina represented the US in this year's World Burlesque Games, held May 7-13 in London.
American Pickers Star Danielle Colby talks family, fame and burlesque .
The show "X Burlesque " at Flamingo celebrates 10 years on the Strip this month.
Burlesque and the Rose City Rollers: Can you see anything wrong with that.
I have never been to a Burlesque Bake show before and wouldn't you know it, we have one coming to the Yakima Seasons this Saturday.
A gallery of photographs from the Royal Jelly Burlesque Lounge at the Revel Casino in Atlantic City, Thursday April 5, 2012.
'Burlesque' leaves no showbiz cliché unturned.
Leave it to local burlesque madame and emcee Cora Vette to start a nationwide revolution in boylesque.
Councilman Konev defends burlesque, calls for 'balance.
Councilman Konev defends burlesque, calls for 'balance.
Frazer Harrison, Getty ImagesMotley Crue bassist Nikki Sixx's girlfriend, Courtney Bingham, made good on her birthday wish for herself to perform a burlesque dance routine onstage at the band's show in Michigan.
Musician's career spanned the bump and grind of Block burlesque houses to the rarefied atmosphere of the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra and academe.
***