buffoon

Definitions

  • WordNet 3.6
    • n buffoon a person who amuses others by ridiculous behavior
    • n buffoon a rude or vulgar fool
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Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
    • n buffoon A man who makes a practice of amusing others by low tricks, antic gestures, etc.; a droll; a mimic; a harlequin; a clown; a merry-andrew.
    • a buffoon Characteristic of, or like, a buffoon. "Buffoon stories.""To divert the audience with buffoon postures and antic dances."
    • v. i buffoon To act the part of a buffoon.
    • v. t Buffoon To treat with buffoonery.
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Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
    • n buffoon One who makes a practice of amusing others by tricks, odd gestures and postures, jokes, and other vulgar pleasantries; a droll; a merryandrew; a clown; a jester.
    • n buffoon Synonyms See zany.
    • buffoon Characteristic of a buffoon; buffoonish.
    • buffoon To act the part of a buffoon.
    • buffoon To make ridiculous.
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Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • n Buffoon buf-ōōn′ one who amuses by jests, grimaces, &c.: a clown: a fool
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Etymology

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
F. bouffon,cf. It. buffone, buffo, buffa, puff of wind, vanity, nonsense, trick), fr. bouffer, to puff out, because the buffoons puffed out their cheeks for the amusement of the spectators. See Buffet a blow
Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
Fr. bouffon—It. buffone, buffare, to jest.

Usage

In literature:

The dervish, Hadji Abderhaman, turned out to be a gourmand, as well as a witty fellow and a buffoon.
"In the Track of the Troops" by R.M. Ballantyne
The author is a vulgar buffoon, and the editor a talkative, tedious old fool.
"The Biglow Papers" by James Russell Lowell
His profession of a buffoon sometimes exhausted him, but he could no longer dare to be like others.
"The Folly Of Eustace" by Robert S. Hichens
Thou waxest insolent, beyond the privilege Of a buffoon.
"The Works of Lord Byron" by Lord Byron
Are jesters and buffoons your choice friends?
"Searchlights on Health: Light on Dark Corners" by B.G. Jefferis
A buffoon expression has this advantage, it is unanswerable.
"Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine, Volume 61, No. 378, April, 1847" by Various
The servant-buffoon was the time form of the buffoon.
"Folkways" by William Graham Sumner
Who sets up for a talker and a wit, sinks at the first trip into a contemptible buffoon.
"Wit and Wisdom of Don Quixote" by Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra
But these were only buffoons, and persons of very shallow learning.
"English Book Collectors" by William Younger Fletcher
A man who is uncommon is either a dandy or a buffoon.
"An Old Man's Love" by Anthony Trollope
Without his protection the poor Goose Man is to be sure your buffoon, your zany, your clown.
"The Goose Man" by Jacob Wassermann
It was not a time for the buffoon; they were faced with all the dread perils of war.
"The Kangaroo Marines" by R. W. Campbell
First, the Buffoon grunts away, and excites their applause, and awakens their acclamations.
"The Fables of Phædrus" by Phaedrus
In short, he entirely sacrificed every appearance of the warrior to the masquerade of a buffoon.
"The Last of the Mohicans" by James Fenimore Cooper
Voltaire is the prince of buffoons.
"Critical and Historical Essays, Volume III (of 3)" by Thomas Babington Macaulay
Nero's love of sympathy, made him anxious to be applauded on the stage as a fiddler and a buffoon.
"Practical Education, Volume I" by Maria Edgeworth
He made them dance, sleep, roar; he made them obstructionists, orators, buffoons, at his will.
"The Confessions of a Caricaturist, Vol. 1 (of 2)" by Harry Furniss
She had made him a laughing-stock, a buffoon, a political joke.
"Rope" by Holworthy Hall
If you are a philosopher, you can study human nature through the buffoon and the mummer.
"The Strollers" by Frederic S. Isham
He was a spendthrift, and afterwards had a quarrel with Cromwell, who denounced him as an unbeliever, and even as a buffoon.
"England, Picturesque and Descriptive" by Joel Cook
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In poetry:

CLAUDIUS.
Yes, the very type of flatness:--
Cease buffooning, for my uncle
Here is coming.
"The Purgatory Of St. Patrick - Act II" by Denis Florence MacCarthy
CHRYSANTHUS.
Leave me, or my wrath you 'll rue;
Hence! buffoon: by heaven I swear it,
I will kill you else.
"The Two Lovers Of Heaven: Chrysanthus And Daria - Act I" by Denis Florence MacCarthy

In news:

Buffoon or conservative populist – we don't know yet.
Trump just confirms his buffoon status.
The transformation began in yet another movie no one saw, 1976's Buffalo Bill & the Indians, or Sitting Bull's History Lesson, in which Newman played the living legend as a drunken buffoon and a showbiz fraud.
V ICE PRESIDENTS are buffoons.
It means that people started driving like buffoons.
Why do these buffoons continue to ramrod the name "Regents" as part of the new university name.
The Hot Air Buffoons, a comedy quartet, will take the stage at the Star Theatre's Annual Evening of Barbershop benefit concert on Saturday.
Those who watched the vice presidential debate Oct 11 saw the vice president of the United States acting like a buffoon and a schoolyard bully.
It's time for Republican Party to get rid of the buffoons.
Young ladies like these deserve better than a buffoon for judge.
It's time for GOP to oust buffoons.
The year's biggest boors, buffoons, and blunderers.
Thanks to the curse of modern technology, you'll be hearing what top Internet buffoons are saying about the candidates—whether you want to or not.
Conservative Media Watchdog Deems Christine O'Donnell A "Buffoon".
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