bridoon

Definitions

  • WordNet 3.6
    • n bridoon a bit resembling a snaffle bit; used with a separate curb
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Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
    • n Bridoon (Mil) The snaffle and rein of a military bridle, which acts independently of the bit, at the pleasure of the rider. It is used in connection with a curb bit, which has its own rein.
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Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
    • n bridoon A light snaffle or bit of a bridle used in addition to the principal bit, and with a separate rein. Also spelled bradoon.
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Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • n Bridoon brid′ōōn the light snaffle usual in a military bridle, in addition to the ordinary bit, controlled by a separate rein.
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Etymology

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
F. bridon, from bride,; of German origin. See Bridle (n.)
Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
Fr. bridon, bride, a bridle.

Usage

In literature:

Bridoon's one of my lambs, as Nosebag calls 'ern.
"Waverley, Or 'Tis Sixty Years Hence, Complete" by Sir Walter Scott
Ostriches roam about this camp, eating empty soda-water bottles and any bridoon bits they can find.
"In the Ranks of the C.I.V." by Erskine Childers
Back to the horse, to be again assailed by Number Two for not having obeyed the order about the bridoon and stirrup-irons.
"The Making Of A Novelist" by David Christie Murray
It may be urged that both for horses and men there is a distinct advantage in beginning again every year with bridoon riding.
"Cavalry in Future Wars" by Frederick von Bernhardi
When you thrust a two-pound bit and bridoon into a small pony's mouth, you hurt his feelings.
"From Sea to Sea" by Rudyard Kipling
TO PUT ON AND TAKE OFF THE BIT AND BRIDOON BRIDLE (MODEL 1909).
"Manual for Noncommissioned Officers and Privates of Cavalry of the Army" by U. S. War Department
If you put the martingale on your bridoon rein you can no longer indicate approval.
"Riding Recollections, 5th ed." by G. J. Whyte-Melville
After the pupil has become expert in riding with the snaffle, she will be ready for the =double bridle=, or the =curb-bit and bridoon=.
"The American Horsewoman" by Elizabeth Karr
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