bombast

Definitions

  • WordNet 3.6
    • n bombast pompous or pretentious talk or writing
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Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
    • Bombast Cotton, or any soft, fibrous material, used as stuffing for garments; stuffing; padding. "How now, my sweet creature of bombast !""Doublets, stuffed with four, five, or six pounds of bombast at least."
    • Bombast Fig.: High-sounding words; an inflated style; language above the dignity of the occasion; fustian. "Yet noisy bombast carefully avoid."
    • a Bombast High-sounding; inflated; big without meaning; magniloquent; bombastic. "He] evades them with a bombast circumstance,
      Horribly stuffed with epithets of war."
      "Nor a tall metaphor in bombast way."
    • Bombast Originally, cotton, or cotton wool. "A candle with a wick of bombast ."
    • v. t Bombast bŏm*bȧst" or bŭm*bȧst" To swell or fill out; to pad; to inflate. "Not bombasted with words vain ticklish ears to feed."
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Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
    • n bombast Cotton; the cotton-plant.
    • n bombast Cotton or other stuff of soft, loose texture, used to stuff garments; padding.
    • n bombast Figuratively, high-sounding words; inflated or extravagant language; fustian; speech too big and high-sounding for the occasion.
    • n bombast Synonyms Bombast, Fustian, Bathos, Turgidness, Tumidness, Rant. “Bombast was originally applied to a stuff of soft, loose texture, used to swell the garment. Fustian was also a kind of cloth of stiff, expansive character. These terms are applied to a high, swelling style of writing, full of extravagant sentiments and expressions. Bathos is a word which has the same application, meaning generally the mock-heroic—that ‘depth’ into which one falls who overleaps the sublime: the step which one makes in passing from the sublime to the ridiculous.” (De Mille, Elements of Rhetoric, p. 225.) Bombast is rather stronger than fustian. Turgidness and tumidness are words drawn from the swelling of the body, and express mere inflation of style without reference to sentiment. Rant is extravagant or violent language, proceeding from enthusiasm or fanaticism, generally in support of extreme opinions or against those holding opinions of a milder or different sort.
    • bombast High-sounding; inflated; big without meaning.
    • bombast To pad out; stuff, as a doublet with cotton; hence, to inflate; swell out with high-sounding or bombastic language.
    • bombast To beat; baste.
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Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • n Bombast bom′- inflated or high-sounding language: originally cotton or any soft material used for stuffing garments
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Etymology

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
OF. bombace, cotton, LL. bombax, cotton, bombasium, a doublet of cotton; hence, padding, wadding, fustian. See Bombazine
Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
Low L. bombax, cotton—Gr. bombyx, silk.

Usage

In literature:

There is a style of bombast morality affected by some authors, which must be hurtful to young readers.
"Practical Education, Volume II" by Maria Edgeworth
It was bombastic stuff, but my blind, boyish belief in it gave it dignity.
"A Son of the Middle Border" by Hamlin Garland
The bombastic proclamation delighted the Tories, who hoped for results from it.
"The Siege of Boston" by Allen French
Stub's style is extremely noble and expressive, devoid of the excessive bombast and sentimentality that many writers then mistook for poetry.
"Hymns and Hymnwriters of Denmark" by Jens Christian Aaberg
He is the emperor of bombast.
"Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine - Volume 57, No. 352, February 1845" by Various
The Chinese system is minutely exact in theory, bombastic in fancy.
"The Great Events by Famous Historians, v. 13" by Various
There were bits of distorted historical facts, fallacious but brilliant reasoning, and much bombast.
"Hope Mills" by Amanda M. Douglas
She came back, and Jeremiah Bumps got another bombasting!
"The Humors of Falconbridge" by Jonathan F. Kelley
He was then in his ill days; but I can imagine him in Congress with his mouth full of bombast and sawder.
"The Works of Robert Louis Stevenson - Swanston Edition" by Robert Louis Stevenson
Compositions are rich and gorgeous but at the same time inflated, turgid and bombastic.
"Music: An Art and a Language" by Walter Raymond Spalding
The roosters' cry had in it nothing but self-gratulatory bombast.
"Old Plymouth Trails" by Winthrop Packard
Epilogue: spoken by Babache in the character of Bombastes Furioso.
"Francezka" by Molly Elliot Seawell
This silence constrained Teleki to avoid the bombastic in his speech.
"The Golden Age in Transylvania" by Mór Jókai
There is a bombastic praise of all her material and spiritual perfections.
"Women of the Teutonic Nations" by Hermann Schoenfeld
The first thing General Smyth did was to issue a proclamation of so bombastic a character that his friends were humiliated.
"The Greater Republic" by Charles Morris
Like his forerunner, he divided his time between bombastic lyrics and epigrams of very considerable merit.
"A Short History of French Literature" by George Saintsbury
I say this in full sincerity, though I remember some of the youthful bombast not altogether without affection.
"My First Book:" by Various
Perverted, it leads to bombast, and a wrong use of extravagant ideas.
"The Illustrated Self-Instructor in Phrenology and Physiology" by O. S. Fowler
The lame reliance of Mexico upon bombastic proclamations was again adopted.
"History of the War Between Mexico and the United States, with a Preliminary View of its Origin, Volume 1" by Brantz Mayer
At length the curtain rose upon 'Bombastes Furioso.
"Rhyme? And Reason?" by Lewis Carroll
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In poetry:

TOO long mere words have thralled us. Let us think!
Oh ponder, are we "free and equal" yet?
That July bombast, writ with blood for ink,
Is blurred with floods of unavailing sweat!
"The Red Winds Come!" by John Gneisenau Neihardt
The night's performance was "King John."
"It's dull," she wept, "and so-so!"
Awhile I let her tears flow on,
She said they soothed her woe so!
At length the curtain rose upon
'Bombastes Furioso.'
"Melancholetta" by Lewis Carroll

In news:

For Harvey Weinstein, the bombastic co-founder of Miramax Films, this holiday movie season is looking a lot like 1998's.
In 1929 Thomas Wolfe , big, bombastic and unkempt, strode into the literary world with a huge novel about the making of a genius: himself.
Loud talking or yelling can put a strain on your vocal cord s, so singers, bombastic politicians and cheerleaders can frequently become hoarse.
A bombastic performer who can barely play his soprano sax beyond a few trademark gimmicks, he is nonetheless a platinum-plated shepherd to throngs of "smooth jazz" sheep, who don't know Charlie Parker from Parker Posey.
My all American sonic bombast weapon of choice for fifty years has been those world class pieces or musical art, the mighty Gibson guitar.
There is usually shirtlessness and bombastic music involved.
When I'm bombastic I have my reasons.
What happens here 200 years ago is one of the biggest blunders in American military history, made all the more arresting by the bombast that precedes it.
Christie is bombastic, entertaining, at times quite effective and, thanks to his "bro-mance" with Newark Mayor Cory Booker, considered a guy who is bi-partisan.
Tough might be considered the anti-Rich, forsaking bombast and showmanship for the subtle pleasures of supporting the tune.
Effective and passionate communicator or too bombastic.
With its gleeful bombast, over-the-top showmanship, and extravagant deployment of dreams as quotidien entertainment, Orlando may be the most "American" city in the nation.
But it wasn't long before the Oscars began to mutate into the orgy of kitsch and bombast we know today.
This warmed-over version of the 1970s subway-hijack thriller is typical Tony Scott bombast.
Extell's bombastic tower is already known for astronomical prices, including $98 million penthouses and a.
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