bog plant

Definitions

  • WordNet 3.6
    • n bog plant a semiaquatic plant that grows in soft wet land; most are monocots: sedge, sphagnum, grasses, cattails, etc; possibly heath
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Usage

In literature:

Then the boy wandered far and wide, over moor and bog, and gathered rare plants and herbs, and laid them down near the hermit's cell.
"Jackanapes, Daddy Darwin's Dovecot and Other Stories" by Juliana Horatio Ewing
They had built houses and planted trees; they had reclaimed the deep bog and converted it into good arable land.
"The Land-War In Ireland (1870)" by James Godkin
This plant grows preferably in cool and moist woods or in bogs.
"Trees, Fruits and Flowers of Minnesota, 1916" by Various
In more southern countries, other water-loving plants lead to the formation of climbing bogs.
"Outlines of the Earth's History" by Nathaniel Southgate Shaler
It should be treated as a bog plant, then it can scarcely fail to do well.
"Hardy Perennials and Old Fashioned Flowers" by John Wood
Then the boy wandered far and wide, over moor and bog, and gathered rare plants and herbs, and laid them down near the hermit's cell.
"Mary's Meadow" by Juliana Horatia Ewing
They planted their right wing at the village of Nypern, which was practically unapproachable on account of deep peat bogs.
"With Frederick the Great" by G. A. Henty
In the winter this covert is also frequented by foxes, and sometimes by pheasants; and the bogs produce many curious plants.
"The Natural History of Selborne, Vol. 1" by Gilbert White
Two years ago I chanced upon a little colony of four or five plants at the edge of a bog.
"My Studio Neighbors" by William Hamilton Gibson
These bogs were to be planted in peppermint, for which, he averred, there was an insatiable demand.
"The Fighting Shepherdess" by Caroline Lockhart
Giufa then went to a bog near by and planted two ears close together and three spans off a tail, and so with all of them.
"Italian Popular Tales" by Thomas Frederick Crane
Clayton suggested that one of the bogs on the plantation be drained and planted in tobacco.
"Tobacco in Colonial Virginia" by Melvin Herndon
In about the third week of the month of January, the plants will require stronger food; and half bog and half leaf mould may be applied.
"The art of promoting the growth of the cucumber and melon" by Thomas Watkins
Next we come to the wonderful pitcher-plants, whose chosen homes are in the black mud of peat-bogs and swamps.
"Harper's Young People, June 8, 1880" by Various
AQUATICS AND BOG PLANTS.
"The Practical Garden-Book" by C. E. Hunn
Nothing was discovered beyond tracks in the reeds and the creature's lair; where the rushes, grass, and bog-plants were beaten down.
"The Swiss Family Robinson" by Jean Rudolph Wyss
The popular name of a plant, also known as the sweet gale or gaul, sweet willow, bog or Dutch myrtle.
"Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 11, Slice 4" by Various
Hardly even the tops of the rushes, tamarisk and other bog-plants protruded above the surface.
"Wild Spain (España agreste)" by Abel Chapman
In the bogs it roots itself in the tufts, and becomes a lovely plant five feet high with ten or fifteen fine blossoms.
"The Wild Flowers of California: Their Names, Haunts, and Habits" by Mary Elizabeth Parsons
The Greater Bog Plants.
"The Life of Johannes Brahms (Vol 2 of 2)" by Florence May
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In news:

After squishing through miles of bog--a mixture of water, peat, plants, and sheep droppings--we seemed to be making little progress.
Marsh marigold (Caltha palustris) is one of the favorite new plants that I have added to the small bog garden in my back yard.
Marsh marigold (Caltha palustris) is one of the favorite new plants that I have added to the small bog garden in my back yard.
These sturdy oak half -barrels, still redolent of California cabernet, are generous enough to hold a water lily, a bog plant, and a couple of fish--and cost only $29.
Splinter Hill Bog Preserve near Rabun, Alabama, in northern Baldwin County contains more than a dozen species of carnivorous plants including five species of pitcher plants within the longleaf pine savanna/seepage bog habitat.
Some of New England's most beautiful wildflowers , including rare orchids, carnivorous plants and shrubs, have adapted to grow in bogs because of the moisture and freedom from competition.
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