bluster

Definitions

  • WordNet 3.6
    • v bluster act in an arrogant, overly self-assured, or conceited manner
    • v bluster show off
    • v bluster blow hard; be gusty, as of wind "A southeaster blustered onshore","The flames blustered"
    • n bluster a swaggering show of courage
    • n bluster vain and empty boasting
    • n bluster a violent gusty wind
    • n bluster noisy confusion and turbulence "he was awakened by the bluster of their preparations"
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Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
    • Bluster Fitful noise and violence, as of a storm; violent winds; boisterousness. "To the winds they set
      Their corners, when with bluster to confound
      Sea, air, and shore."
    • Bluster Noisy and violent or threatening talk; noisy and boastful language.
    • Bluster To blow fitfully with violence and noise, as wind; to be windy and boisterous, as the weather. "And ever-threatening storms
      Of Chaos blustering round."
    • Bluster To talk with noisy violence; to swagger, as a turbulent or boasting person; to act in a noisy, tumultuous way; to play the bully; to storm; to rage. "Your ministerial directors blustered like tragic tyrants."
    • v. t Bluster To utter, or do, with noisy violence; to force by blustering; to bully. "He bloweth and blustereth out . . . his abominable blasphemy.""As if therewith he meant to bluster all princes into a perfect obedience to his commands."
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Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
    • bluster To roar and be tumultuous, as wind; blow boisterously: as, the storm blusters without.
    • bluster To be loud, noisy, or swaggering; swagger, as a turbulent or boasting person; utter loud empty menaces or protests.
    • bluster [Only in ME.; perhaps a different word. Cf. LG. blustern, blistern, flutter in alarm.] To wander or run about aimlessly.
    • bluster To compel or force by mere bluster.
    • bluster To utter with bluster, or with noise and violence: generally with out or forth.
    • n bluster The noise of a storm or of violent wind; a blast; a gust.
    • n bluster A boisterous blast, or loud tumultuous noise.
    • n bluster Noisy but empty talk or menace; swagger; boisterous self-assertion.
    • n bluster Synonyms Turbulence, boasting, bragging, bullying.
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Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • v.i Bluster blus′tėr to make a noise like a blast of wind: to bully or swagger
    • n Bluster a blast or roaring as of the wind: bullying or boasting language: a storm of anger
    • adj Bluster stormy: tumultuous: boastful
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Etymology

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
Allied to blast,

Usage

In literature:

In vain the Earl coaxed and blustered and bullied.
"Love Romances of the Aristocracy" by Thornton Hall
It may quiet your bluster.
"Helmet of Navarre" by Bertha Runkle
The Indians began to bluster, to talk loud and to grow insolent.
"Christopher Carson" by John S. C. Abbott
He is made a blusterer.
"The Poetry Of Robert Browning" by Stopford A. Brooke
He attempted at first to bluster in his turn, and with most women would probably have gained his point.
"Three Voyages for the Discovery of a Northwest Passage from the Atlantic to the Pacific, and Narrative of an Attempt to Reach the North Pole, Volume 2 (of 2)" by Sir William Edward Parry
He laughed his suggestion away somewhat blusteringly and launched out again on his panegyric of the Cure.
"Septimus" by William J. Locke
What's wan girl against a parish full, an' a blustering chap made o' diamonds?
"Children of the Mist" by Eden Phillpotts
Blustering March and weeping April prepare us for shining May.
"Around The Tea-Table" by T. De Witt Talmage
This of course Jaffery has blusteringly denied.
"Jaffery" by William J. Locke
With Philip of France was Conrad of Montferrat, a large, pale, ruminating Italian, full of bluster and thick blood.
"The Life and Death of Richard Yea-and-Nay" by Maurice Hewlett
He would storm and bluster at the idea.
"The Tinder-Box" by Maria Thompson Daviess
Although the wind still whistled with shrill violence it was more blustering than threatening.
"The Wings of the Morning" by Louis Tracy
He was talking to the girl in a high-keyed yet somewhat blustering voice, asking questions which Win could not and did not try to hear.
"Winnie Childs" by C. N. Williamson
Once he came puffing into the room where DeGolyer was writing, and blusteringly flounced upon a sofa.
"The Colossus" by Opie Read
Hebron is, to use the expressive term of the Newfoundland fishermen, a "blusterous" place.
"With the Harmony to Labrador" by Benjamin La Trobe
He drank freely, and was loud-mouthed and blustering on the street.
"Sevenoaks" by J. G. Holland
He was always blustering, you could never do enough for him no how.
"The Underground Railroad" by William Still
When he sought to bluster, she cut him short.
"The Bells of San Juan" by Jackson Gregory
He was blusterous and garrulous and, to Burgess' amazement, not at all amused.
"New Faces" by Myra Kelly
It is freer than the ships on the raging ocean, aye, freer than the balloons in the blustering air.
"All Around the Moon" by Jules Verne
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In poetry:

Water in the fields.
The wind pours down.
The feathers flare
And bluster in the wind.
"Ploughing On Sunday" by Wallace Stevens
And now upon her frozen ear
Mysterious sounds arose;
So, on the mountain's piny top
The blustering north wind blows.
"Gondoline" by Henry Kirke White
Later a brute wind blustered,
bracing men to face danger.
They made me sit inside then,
sullen, dull, with the women.
"The Pipit" by Jonas Hallgrimsson
While rattles over riven rocks
The thunder, harsh and dry;
And blustering gum and brooding box
Are threshing at the sky!
"Dungog" by Henry Kendall
Ripe as the melting cluster!
No lily has such lustre;
Yet hard to tame
As raging flame,
And fierce as storms that bluster.
"Acis and Galatea" by John Gay
Dreaming of palm-fringed keys
And the smell of the lands they know
And the bluster of winter winds
In the Gulf of Mexico.
"The City of Winds" by Theodore Goodridge Roberts

In news:

William Shatner, who turned 81 in March, still seems possessed of boundless energy and bluster.
A nor'easter blustered into New York and New Jersey on Wednesday, threatening to swamp homes all over again, plunge neighborhoods back into darkness and inflict more misery on tens of thousands of people still reeling from Superstorm Sandy.
Singer Morrissey lashes out at Britain's 'blustering jingoism '.
Morrissey Fumes Over 'Blustering Jingoism ' of London Olympics.
Carter's Layin ' in the Cut is more about bluster than nuance.
They remembered the 13-year-old as a troubled boy from a broken home, a blusterer with a wiry arm who befriended younger, smaller boys he could dominate.
IT COULD BE bluster, hope or stone-cold truth, but top Democrats insist that the outcome of the presidential race in Pennsylvania won't be affected by the state's new voter-ID law.
In the winter of 1990, at the Plaza Hotel, on a blustering afternoon, their epic feud ended in a clinch — not to say an embrace.
Howard Smith/US PresswireHe may be a quote machine, but Rex Ryan should resolve to take the bluster down a notch in 2012.
Torrential rainfall and blusterous winds weathered the Queen City on Monday evening, causing headlining performers to cut their concerts short.
Warm front s bluster into our mountain valley pretty regularly during winter, and predicting their snow-softening progress requires little in the way of scientific prowess.
" A lot of bluster," no specifics from GOP on "fiscal cliff".
Coca-Cola, PepsiCo not biting on Birnbaum's bluster.
Americans back up their bluster.
Think negotiating is all bluff and bluster.
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