barnacle

Definitions

  • Crabs and barnacles
    Crabs and barnacles
  • WordNet 3.6
    • n barnacle European goose smaller than the brant; breeds in the far north
    • n barnacle marine crustaceans with feathery food-catching appendages; free-swimming as larvae; as adults form a hard shell and live attached to submerged surfaces
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Additional illustrations & photos:

Barnacles Barnacles

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
  • Interesting fact: A barnacle has the largest penis of any other animal in relation to its size
    • n Barnacle A bernicle goose.
    • Barnacle (Far) An instrument for pinching a horse's nose, and thus restraining him. "The barnacles . . . give pain almost equal to that of the switch."
    • n Barnacle (Zoöl) Any cirriped crustacean adhering to rocks, floating timber, ships, etc., esp. the sessile species (genus Balanus and allies), and the stalked or goose barnacles (genus Lepas and allies). See Cirripedia, and Goose barnacle.
    • Barnacle Spectacles; -- so called from their resemblance to the barnacles used by farriers.
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Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
  • Interesting fact: The animal that tends to cling to rocks and boats are barnacles.
    • n barnacle A species of wild goose, Anser bernicla or Bernicla leucopsis, also called barnacle-goose or bernacle-goose. It is one of several species of the genus Bernicla, inhabiting the northern parts of Europe, and occasionally appearing as a straggler in North America. It is smaller than the various wild geese of the genus Anser proper, has dark-brown or blackish upper parts, and a black neck and head, with large white patches. It is related to the common wild goose of North America, B. canadensis, and still more closely to the brent- or brant-goose, Bernicla brenta. This bird, which was known in the British islands only as a visitor, became the subject of a curious popular fable, not yet extinct, being believed to be bred from a tree growing on the sea-shore, either from the fruit of the tree or as itself the fruit (hence called tree-goose), or from a shell-fish which grew on this tree (see def. 2), or from rotting wood in the water.
    • n barnacle A species of stalked cirriped, Lepas anatifera, of the family Lepadidæ, found hanging in clusters by the long peduncle to the bottoms of ships, to floating timber, or to submerged wood of any kind; the goose-mussel, fabled to fall from its support and turn into a goose (see def. 1). The name is sometimes extended or transferred to various other cirripeds, as the sessile acorn-shells or sea-acorns of the family Balanidæ, such as Balanus tintinnabulum. See Balanus. This is the usual sense of the word, except in Great Britain.
    • n barnacle Anything resembling a barnacle (in sense 2). Any anomalous growth or extraneous adhering matter or arrangement tending to impede progress.
    • n barnacle A person holding on tenaciously to a place or position; one who is a useless or incompetent fixture in an office or employment; a follower who will not be dismissed or shaken off.
    • n barnacle [Cf. barnard.] A decoy swindler.
    • barnacle To fix or attach, as a barnacle upon the bottom of a ship.
    • n barnacle A kind of bit or muzzle used to restrain an unruly horse or ass; now (usually in the plural), an instrument consisting of two branches joined at one end with a hinge, placed on a horse's nose to restrain him while being shod, bled, or dressed.
    • n barnacle Hence An instrument of torture applied in a similar way to persons.
    • n barnacle plural Spectacles.
    • barnacle To apply barnacles to: as, to barnacle a horse.
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Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
  • Interesting fact: The penis of a barnacle may reach up to 20 times its body size
    • n Barnacle bär′na-kl a shellfish which adheres to rocks and the bottoms of ships: a companion who sticks closely
    • n Barnacle bär′na-kl an instrument consisting of two branches joined by a hinge, placed on the nose of horses to keep them quiet:
    • n Barnacle bär′na-kl (pl.) a colloquial term for 'spectacles.'—adj. Bar′nacled.
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Etymology

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
Prob. from E. barnacle, a kind of goose, which was popularly supposed to grow from this shellfish; but perh. from LL. bernacula, for pernacula, dim. of perna, ham, sea mussel; cf. Gr. pe`rna ham. Cf. F. bernacle, barnacle, E. barnacle, a goose; and Ir. bairneach, barneach, limpet
Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
O. Fr. bernac, of which bernacle seems to be a dim. form. The sense of 'spectacles' has been traced to O. Fr. bericle, eye-glass—berillus, beryl; but this is improbable.

Usage

In literature:

Nevertheless, in France, the Barnacle Goose may be eaten on fast-days by virtue of this old belief in its marine origin.
"Notes and Queries, Number 201, September 3, 1853" by Various
Yet nothing met her eyes but more rocks, and surf, and fissures brown with rust and barnacles.
"Eyebright" by Susan Coolidge
Picking his way over the barnacled rocks he started for the beach.
"El Diablo" by Brayton Norton
One day Beth found some queer things in a pool, and Sophia told her they were barnacles.
"The Beth Book" by Sarah Grand
Here will be found hydroids, sea-anemones, starfishes, sea-urchins, barnacles, mussels.
"Scouting For Girls, Official Handbook of the Girl Scouts" by Girl Scouts
They told Purt that the Barnacle possessed a family resemblance to the Sweets that could not be denied.
"The Girls of Central High in Camp" by Gertrude W. Morrison
The ship barnacle began its career with two splendid eyes.
"A Man's Value to Society" by Newell Dwight Hillis
In order to prevent barnacles from injuring a ship's bottom, sheathing is put on.
"Harper's Young People, June 15, 1880" by Various
Their faces were flushed as if by hard drinking, and their pimpled noses resembled huge red barnacles.
"Japanese Fairy World" by William Elliot Griffis
Among others, Darwin had a considerable collection of barnacles gathered from boats and wharves in all parts of the world.
"The Meaning of Evolution" by Samuel Christian Schmucker
How was it that these brown savages were free, and he barnacled to a slab-sided bark?
"Wild Justice: Stories of the South Seas" by Lloyd Osbourne
Plover and curlew fly not over my house, Do not speak, wild barnacle, passing over this mountain.
"Changing Winds" by St. John G. Ervine
But she did not care; for Father Barnacle was to stay and "stone up," as they called their queer way of dying.
"Lulu's Library, Volume II" by Louisa M. Alcott
About six feet below the barnacles a cavernous-jawed barracouta, perhaps five feet long, lay motionless but for the easy waving of its fins.
"The Haunters of the Silences" by Charles G. D. Roberts
When the Great Eastern was recently cleaned 300 tons of barnacles were scraped from her bottom, an area of more than 52,000 square feet.
"The Galaxy, May, 1877" by Various
She's stuck to me like a barnacle.
"Thirty" by Howard Vincent O'Brien
Humpback whales carry many barnacles and whale lice.
"Whales, Dolphins, and Porpoises of the Western North Atlantic" by Stephen Leatherwood
Now tell me about this old fellow Jack described as a 'barnacled curiosity.
"Rockhaven" by Charles Munn
According to an old fable, these animals produced barnacle geese.
"The New Gresham Encyclopedia. Vol. 1 Part 3" by Various
Perhaps the story of the barnacle's originating from a shell of the same name, may have been invented for a similar purpose.
"Lives of Eminent Zoologists, from Aristotle to Linnæus" by William MacGillivray
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In poetry:

My niece, the Barnacle, has got
My piercing eyes of black;
The Elephant has got my nose,
I do not want it back.
"The Oneness Of The Philosopher With Nature" by Gilbert Keith Chesterton
From spar to deck, from deck to keel,
From barnacle to shroud,
There weren't one pair of reach-me-downs
To all that jabbering crowd.
"The Ship Of Rio" by Walter de la Mare
Dragging their Jesus hair.
Did I escape, I wonder?
My mind winds to you
Old barnacled umbilicus, Atlantic cable,
Keeping itself, it seems, in a state of miraculous
repair.
"Medusa" by Sylvia Plath
One moonlit night a ship drove in,
A ghost ship from the west,
Drifting with bare mast and lone tiller,
Like a mermaid drest
In long green weed and barnacles:
She beached and came to rest.
"The "Alice Jean"" by Robert Graves
They all agreed very well, though at times you heard it said
That BILL had a way of his own of making his lips look red -
That JOE looked quite his age - or somebody might declare
That BARNACLE'S long pig-tail was never his own own hair.
"The Bumboat Woman's Story" by William Schwenck Gilbert

In news:

Come out and enjoy the music at The Barnacle Historic State Park, 3485 Main Highway in downtown Coconut Grove.
Rumson's Barnacle Bill Won't Serve Peanuts Anymore – Do the Few Ruin it for the Majority.
Maybe it's the funky economy with so many folks looking for the big payday…but another casualty of our over litigious society is the peanut tradition at Barnacle Bill's in Rumson.
This September, The Barnacle Historic Park will be hosting a dance party every fourth Sunday of the month until the end of December.
Guests are invited to wrap up the Great Grove Bed Race on Sunday, September 2 with a pajama party at The Barnacle Historic State Park.
Fly problems at Barnacle Bud 's in Bay View.
Barnacle Bud 's in Bay View on Hilbert off of K.K.
Ralph Munroe's Barnacle: Centerpiece of a Legacy.
Shamika and Jerome Scott have been regular customers at Tallahassee's Barnacle Bill's Restaurant.
Shamika and Jerome Scott have been regular customers at Tallahassee's "Barnacle Bill's Restaurant".
The new album We Were Drifting On A Sad Song by Danish dream-gaze group—and CMJ Mixtape band—Sleep Party People is available to purchase today on Brine And Barnacles.
Vice President Joe Biden, America's textbook Beltway barnacle, still labors under the illusion that he is America's middle-class Everyman.
An Arctic Barnacle Goose, left, shares a meal with a Canada Goose in Van Cortlandt Park's Parade Ground on Nov 30.
Massive animal leaves behind 'blubber and barnacles' and a broken mast.
Also called a "barnacle," in most cases, the PUP is spyware, adware or some other unwanted software.
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In science:

Seekers after extended mnemonics for the sequence of spectral types may wish to make use of longlived tortoises, for instance in the form, Ordovician Barnacles And Fossil Gastropods Killed My Long-lived Tortoise Yesterday.
Astrophysics in 2006
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