bandolier

Definitions

  • WordNet 3.6
    • n bandolier a broad cartridge belt worn over the shoulder by soldiers
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Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
    • Bandolier A broad leather belt formerly worn by soldiers over the right shoulder and across the breast under the left arm. Originally it was used for supporting the musket and twelve cases for charges, but later only as a cartridge belt.
    • Bandolier One of the leather or wooden cases in which the charges of powder were carried.
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Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • n Bandolier a leathern belt worn by musketeers, to which their ammunition was fixed.
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Etymology

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
F. bandoulière,cf. It. bandoliera, Sp. bandolera,), fr. F. bande, band, Sp. & It. banda,. See Band (n.)
Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
O. Fr. bandouillere—It. bandoliera, banda, a band.

Usage

In literature:

He wore three bandoliers bristling with ammunition over a torn and stained shirt.
"The Watchers of the Plains" by Ridgewell Cullum
An empty bandolier crossed his extended chest diagonally.
"A Yeoman's Letters" by P. T. Ross
There were haversacks of coarse canvas for the Volunteers, finished and partly made, with ammunition-pouches and bandoliers.
"The Dop Doctor" by Clotilde Inez Mary Graves
All those who stuck to the trench and did not use wet bandoliers or handkerchiefs died.
"The Red Watch" by J. A. Currie
He looked every inch an Anglo-Saxon, in his khaki uniform and his great slouch hat, with his bayonet and his bandolier.
"Ghetto Comedies" by Israel Zangwill
Put on your bandoliers.
"Lippincott's Magazine, September, 1885" by Various
On their backs they carried, in addition to their cumbersome packs, extra shoes and extra bandoliers of cartridges.
""And they thought we wouldn't fight"" by Floyd Gibbons
He handed him his helmet and bandolier and took the forage-cap in exchange.
"'Jena' or 'Sedan'?" by Franz Beyerlein
Each bed was hung round and littered with haversacks, boots, rifles, bandoliers and uniforms bloody and begrimed.
"A Journal of Impressions in Belgium" by May Sinclair
They carried rifles and there were bandoliers of cartridges across their chests and grenades at their belts.
"The Flaming Mountain" by Harold Leland Goodwin
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In poetry:

Count—count—count—count—the bullets in the bandoliers.
If—your—eyes—drop—they will get atop o' you!
(Boots—boots—boots—boots—movin' up an' down again) —
There's no discharge in the war!
"Boots" by Rudyard Kipling