astuteness

Definitions

  • Astuteness, readiness. Neapolitan
    Astuteness, readiness. Neapolitan
  • WordNet 3.6
    • n astuteness the intellectual ability to penetrate deeply into ideas
    • n astuteness intelligence manifested by being astute (as in business dealings)
    • ***
Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
    • n astuteness The quality of being astute; cunning; shrewdness.
    • ***
Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • n Astuteness .—The adj. Astū′cious, adv. Astū′ciously, and n. Astū′city are all rare
    • ***

Quotations

  • Cullen Hightower
    Cullen Hightower
    “Those who agree with us may not be right, but we admire their astuteness.”

Etymology

Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
L. astutusastus, crafty, akin perhaps to Acute.

Usage

In literature:

Tradition says that the Chinese, being astute astronomers, got the moon to do the work.
"Among the Forces" by Henry White Warren
It was the most fallacious dream that a really astute man ever indulged in.
"Notable Events of the Nineteenth Century" by Various
Even the more astute of the French begin to dread the name of Pitt.
"French and English" by Evelyn Everett-Green
The astute vicomte, that diplomat?
"The Grey Cloak" by Harold MacGrath
But the astute young Londoner was not to be put off so easily.
"The Wharf by the Docks" by Florence Warden
The Americans present, with their usual astuteness, would term it bluff.
"The Pursuit of the House-Boat" by John Kendrick Bangs
And that was where, in this one matter, they both saw a little farther than the astute Jean.
"Jan" by A. J. Dawson
The Southern political mind, connected with slaveholding, is astute when sharpened by jealousy.
"Continental Monthly, Vol. II. July, 1862. No. 1." by Various
Egyptians are more astute than affectionate.
"Idolatry" by Julian Hawthorne
Secretly, however, the astute Frenchman sought to rob Washington of his Indians.
"Historic Tales, Vol. 1 (of 15)" by Charles Morris
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In poetry:

"It’s dry, all right," said young O’Neil,
With which astute remark
He squatted down upon his heel
And chewed a piece of bark.
"Said Hanrahan" by John O Brien
“It seems to me his hands should be
astutely clasped in front.
With both thumbs a pointing toward the ground.”
Said Reverend Hunt.
"An Informal Prayer -- The Prayer Of Cyrus Brown" by Sam Walter Foss
With such astuteness do they counterfeit,
We do not realize the masks are on
Till, gaudy in our folly, bit by bit
We notice that a neighbor's face seems drawn.
"The Golden Corpse" by Stephen Vincent Benet
Why of hidden things dispute,
Mind unwise, howe'er astute,
Making that thy task
Where the Judge will, at the last,
When disputing all is past,
Not a question ask?
"After Thomas Kempis" by George MacDonald

In news:

The tectonic plates of the financial system continue to shift daily, leaving even the most astute economists scratching their heads.
Van Sciver's psychologically astute examination of what might be termed Abraham Lincoln's "lost years" (1837–1842) is as gripping and persuasive as the best historical fiction.
Last Resort, Pawel Pawlikowski's previous film, was a pitch-perfect, post-Loachian portrait of refugee idleness in the lowlands of Kent, so astutely naturalistic it's hard to believe that it wasn't shot from behind a two-way mirror.
From arcane genre tropes to unearthed pop nuggets (to, some might say, entire movies), Quentin Tarantino is nothing if not cinema's most astute borrower.
Intuition is founded in part on astute observation—something animals are much better at than humans.
With the astute political climate that surrounds today's Super Tuesday everybody-but-Wisconsin's primary extravaganza, it's hard not to begin thinking about where your own vote might go.
Any astute economist at the local and state level realizes the value of the revenue generated by outdoors recreation.
He did, however, astutely question the boundaries of any given medium and the parameters of art itself.
I am certain that this year, like all new years, will bring many changes that even the most astute among us will have not foreseen.
Unlike other oligarchs – including Roman Abramovich, with whom Deripaska astutely merged his aluminum holdings during his rise to the top, eventually buying out his friend and partner – Deripaska isn't about to decamp to London.
An astute listener, who says he choked on his coffee when I miss- pronounced it probably from laughter, sent me a link to a site called Atchafalaya National Heritage Attractions, so I could see and hear the pronunciation for THAT word.
I have more tips to share on repurposing items, thanks to our astute readers.
One astute Politicker reader suggests.
"While a part of his intent was obviously to entertain, there is a culturally intelligent and politically astute side of Michael Jackson that has not been seriously explored," said Georgette Norman, director of the Rosa Parks Museum.
Central Oklahoma should be proud and thankful to have an astute individual in the person of Dr Ed Shadid on the Oklahoma City Council.
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In science:

The astute reader may have noticed that the modifier “strictly” is not being applied to “superrigid” in this section (c.f.
What is a superrigid subgroup?
The astute reader might notice that we evaluated the performance of our algorithm in a rather adversarial setting.
Random Projections for the Nonnegative Least-Squares Problem
The astute reader may observe that there is a problem with the above paragraph if τ   finn for some n, or if |τ | ¤ 1.
Strong jump traceability and Demuth randomness
The astute reader will notice that this reformulation of t is very similar to the way in which the contact invariant c(Y , ξ ) is defined in [OSz05] – via a filtration on cCF(−Y ) induced by the connected binding of an open book supporting (Y , ξ ).
On the equivalence of Legendrian and transverse invariants in knot Floer homology
The astute reader will notice two examples of “interpulses” — a secondary pulse separated by about 180 degrees from the main pulse.
Binary and Millisecond Pulsars at the New Millennium
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