arsonist

Definitions

  • WordNet 3.6
    • n arsonist a criminal who illegally sets fire to property
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Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
    • n arsonist One who commits arson.
    • ***

Usage

In literature:

In 1983, "Tom Edison" had his computer stolen and his house set on fire by an arsonist.
"Hacker Crackdown" by Bruce Sterling
Counterfeiters of money, arsonists, and robbers of pilgrims and merchants were to be excommunicated.
"Our Legal Heritage, 5th Ed." by S. A. Reilly
Dad had already gotten it, from fire-alarm center, but he hadn't heard that Devis was one of the deceased arsonists.
"Four-Day Planet" by Henry Beam Piper
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In poetry:

When a stately home bursts into flames,
instead of the fireman I summon,
an arsonist bursts on the scene,
and he is I. There is nothing I can do.
What must I do to distinguish myself?
How can I put myself together?
"We Are Many" by Pablo Neruda

In news:

Letting 'arsonists' fight fiscal fires.
Crank call arsonist arrested at Red Roof Inn.
Creation of arsonists registry not approved.
Regarding the Wednesday article covering the sentencing of arsonist/murderer Shayne Davis.
Crank call arsonist arrested at Red Roof Inn .
Lancaster Police Arrest Alleged Serial Arsonist.
Letting 'arsonists' fight fiscal fires.
One Detroit firefighter said that crews had to worry more about downed power lines from Superstorm Sandy than they had to worry about arsonists on and leading up to Halloween night this year.
Like many US cities, Mansfield , Ohio, is under attack by arsonists.
Alleged arsonist collapses in court as officials await report on his mental health .
An arsonist ignited a stack of books at Alameda High School early Wednesday morning, causing minimal damage inside a classroom before firefighters extinguished the blaze, police said.
Don't try selling the idea of a playful evening of hijinks to people in Camden, for instance, where past Devil's Nights have turned into playgrounds for arsonists and rioters.
Ex-FBI profiler helps nab serial arsonists.
CEDAR RAPIDS, Iowa — A serial arsonist who set fire to homes and buildings in northeastern Iowa has been sentenced to 20 years in prison.
Arsonist tries burning occupied trailer.
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In science:

Example 2.1: Suppose that two arsonists drop lit matches in different parts of a dry forest, and both cause trees to start burning.
Causes and Explanations: A Structural-Model Approach. Part II: Explanations
U that determines, among other things, the motivation and state of mind of the arsonists.
Causes and Explanations: A Structural-Model Approach. Part II: Explanations
For simplicity, assume that R(U ) = {u00 , u10 , u01 , u11}; if U = uij , then the first arsonist intends to start a fire iff i = 1 and the second arsonist intends to start a fire iff j = 1.
Causes and Explanations: A Structural-Model Approach. Part II: Explanations
Here we focus on that part of the causal model that involves forest fires started by arsonists.
Causes and Explanations: A Structural-Model Approach. Part II: Explanations
In the disjunctive model, in the context where both arsonists drop a match, if the first arsonist does not drop a match, the forest still burns down.
Causes and Explanations: A Structural-Model Approach. Part II: Explanations
In either scenario, both arsonists dropping a lit match constitutes a sufficient cause for the forest fire, as does the first arsonist dropping a lit match and sneezing.
Causes and Explanations: A Structural-Model Approach. Part II: Explanations
Although each arsonist is a cause of the forest burning down in the conjunctive scenario, under reasonable assumptions about the knowledge of the agent wanting an explanation, each arsonist alone is not an explanation of the forest burning down.
Causes and Explanations: A Structural-Model Approach. Part II: Explanations
Both arsonists together provide the explanation in that case; identifying arsonist 1 would only trigger a further quest for the identity of her accomplice.
Causes and Explanations: A Structural-Model Approach. Part II: Explanations
In the disjunctive scenario, each arsonist alone is an explanation of the forest burning down.
Causes and Explanations: A Structural-Model Approach. Part II: Explanations
What does the definition of explanation tell us for the arsonist example? What counts as a cause is, as expected, very much dependent on the causal model and the agent’s epistemic state.
Causes and Explanations: A Structural-Model Approach. Part II: Explanations
If the causal model has only arsonists as the cause of the fire, there are two possible explanations in the disjunctive scenario: (a) arsonist 1 did it and (b) arsonist 2 did it (assuming K consists of three contexts, where either 1, 2, or both set the fire).
Causes and Explanations: A Structural-Model Approach. Part II: Explanations
In the conjunctive scenario, no explanation is necessary, since the agent knows that both arsonists must have lit a match if arson is the only possible cause of the fire (assuming that the agent considers the two arsonists to be the only possible arsonists).
Causes and Explanations: A Structural-Model Approach. Part II: Explanations
That is, if the two arsonists are the only possible cause of the fire and the fire is observed, then K can consist of only one context, namely, the one where both arsonists started the fire.
Causes and Explanations: A Structural-Model Approach. Part II: Explanations
For example, consider the conjunctive scenario of the arsonist example again.
Causes and Explanations: A Structural-Model Approach. Part II: Explanations
Suppose that the structural model is such that the only causes of fire are the arsonists, lightning, and unattended campfires and that K consists of contexts where each of these possibilities is the actual cause of the fire.
Causes and Explanations: A Structural-Model Approach. Part II: Explanations
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