armament

Definitions

  • WordNet 3.6
    • n armament the act of equiping with weapons in preparation for war
    • n armament weaponry used by military or naval force
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Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
    • Armament A body of forces equipped for war; -- used of a land or naval force. "The whole united armament of Greece."
    • Armament (Mil. & Nav) All the cannon and small arms collectively, with their equipments, belonging to a ship or a fortification.
    • Armament Any equipment for resistance.
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Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
    • n armament A body of forees equipped for war: used of a land or naval force.
    • n armament Munitions of war; especially, the number and weight of all the guns which a ship of war carries. Within a comparatively short period remarkable changes have occurred in the size and weight of the armament of war-vessels. In the United States, before the civil war, the usual armament for both forts and vessels consisted of 32-pounders. The war led to the construction and use of 15-inch smooth-bore guns, weighing 50,000 pounds, and afterward of 20-inch guns, weighing 100,000 pounds. Rifled cannon, which had been introduced in 1859, were also increased in size up to the 10-inch-bore Parrott gun throwing a 300-pound projectile. Of other countries, the armament of the British navy may be taken as representative. In 1861 the “Warrior” was provided with 4 3/4-ton guns; but since then the weight of metal has been successively increased up to the 80-ton guns of the “Inflexible” and the 110-ton guns of the barbette ship “Camperdown.” In Europe preference is given to the piercing power of elongated projectiles moving at a great velocity and fired from rifled guns. In the United States reliance has until recently been placed upon the smashing effect of heavy spherical projectiles fired at a low velocity from smooth-bore guns. See gun.
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Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • n Armament ärm′a-ment forces armed or equipped for war: munitions of war, esp. the great guns with which a ship is armed.
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Etymology

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
L. armamenta, pl., utensils, esp. the tackle of a ship, fr. armare, to arm: cf. LL. armamentum, F. armement,
Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
L. armamentaarma.

Usage

In literature:

Armaments were piled up at a faster rate than ever.
"A School History of the Great War" by Albert E. McKinley, Charles A. Coulomb, and Armand J. Gerson
All merchant vessels carried some kind of armament against pirates in that part of the world.
"Dewey and Other Naval Commanders" by Edward S. Ellis
What indeed was it but this even balance and consequent fear which produced the race for armaments?
"Essays in Liberalism" by Various
The enemy's numbers, armaments, readiness, and efficiency had been submitted to a most searching examination.
"The Navy as a Fighting Machine" by Bradley A. Fiske
It was the fire that counted, the ferocity, the "devil," the armament, and the appalling speed.
"The Way of the Wild" by F. St. Mars
Her armament is only four six-pounder rapid-fire guns.
"Young Peoples' History of the War with Spain" by Prescott Holmes
The essence of these was the attempt to get her way by creating armaments which should in effect place her neighbors at her mercy.
"Before the War" by Viscount Richard Burton Haldane
The campaign was opened by the French before Prussia and Austria had prepared their armaments.
"History of the Girondists, Volume I" by Alphonse de Lamartine
Adequate guarantees given and taken that national armaments will be reduced to the lowest point consistent with domestic safety.
"In the World War" by Count Ottokar Czernin
No finer armament, certainly no better-equipped armament, ever left the English shores.
"English Seamen in the Sixteenth Century" by James Anthony Froude
Next, there were ready thirty-four high-speed cruisers of quite light armament and armor.
"The Story of the Great War, Volume III (of 12)"
The army was very heterogeneous both as regarded its nationalities and its armament.
"Roumania Past and Present" by James Samuelson
This was a heavy armament, but the ship was strong enough to bear it.
"Within The Enemy's Lines" by Oliver Optic
It was a mighty and splendid armament.
"The Norwegian account of Haco's expedition against Scotland, A.D. MCCLXIII." by Sturla Þórðarson
Reduction of national armaments.
"Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh Debate Index" by Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh
No doubt his armaments and munitions are growing fast, but ours have for the moment overtaken them.
"Letters from France" by C. E. W. Bean
Here the armament was to meet.
"Historical Tales, Vol. 4 (of 15)" by Charles Morris
This armament sailed from Boston on the 30th of July.
"The Life of George Washington, Vol. 1 (of 5)" by John Marshall
This might be acquired at a less expense than would be incurred in fitting out the proposed armament, and its utility would be immediate.
"The Life of George Washington, Vol. 5 (of 5)" by John Marshall
Terror is not always the effect of force, and an armament is not a victory.
"Standard Selections" by Various
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In poetry:

"All wars are planned by older men
In council rooms apart,
Who call for greater armament
And map the battle chart.
"Two Sides Of War (All Wars)" by Henry Grantland Rice
This pearly armament's support
Is cunningly built, a coral fort
Compassed with ruby fleets, which float
'Round there for aye.
"Biographia" by Samuel Alfred Beadle
Deem ye their armaments confess
A source of mutable desire?
Think ye He mailed His thought in fire
And called from night and nothingness
"The Testimony of the Suns" by George Sterling
The medal is awarded
when nothing more happens,
when the artillery falls silent,
when the enemy has grown invisible and the shadow of eternal armament
covers the sky.
"Every Day" by Ingeborg Bachmann
'Twas hard to realize on
This snug side the mute horizon
That beyond it hostile armaments might steer,
Save from seeing in the porchway a fair woman weep with eyes on
A harnessed Volunteer.
"The Alarm" by Thomas Hardy
Upon its wings it bore the scent
Of blood of a great armament:
Then saw they how on either side
Fields were down-trodden far and wide. That morning at the break of day
Two nations had gone forth to slay.
"Repining" by Christina Georgina Rossetti

In news:

The kit provides just about everything except the engine block, plus optional armament: M2.50-caliber machine gun.
Pound for dollar, the Joint Direct Attack Munition bomb may be the best armament in the high-tech arsenal used in the effort to topple Iraqi leader Saddam Hussein.
At the same time, the slower firing cannons represented a different armament concept from the fast firing machine gun packages of the American fighters.
At first the Defiants were able to devastate German bomber formations, but soon the Luftwaffe figured out they had no forward-facing armament and attacked them from below, where the turrets could not shoot.
In the tiny village of Caux, just up the hill from the city of Montreux in Southwest Switzerland, there's something called the Center for Moral Re-Armament.
From mortal combat to private hells to a game nobody should play, the week abounds with action, adventure, and armaments.
And under Adolph Hitler 's leadership it had decided to invest heavily in armaments.
The one element that renders all of the armament of God effective is prayer .
The simple explanation is the change in armament from the original Sabre 's 6 x 0.50 caliber Browning machine gun six-pack to the Hotel model M39 4 x 20mm cannon suite.
Armament Systems and Procedures (ASP) is offering yet another color to choose from in its popular Defender family of Oleoresin Capsicum (OC) personal safety devices.
That's important because carrying armaments outside the bays, under the wing, makes the plane considerably less stealthy .
The Zero could outmaneuver the F4F, but the Wildcat 's heavy armament and solid construction gave it an advantage when flown by skilled pilots.
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In science:

Science has made it possible for modern warfare to acquire its lethal character, and has led to the threats posed by modern armaments, conventional, chemical, biological and nuclear.
Do We Need a Scientific Revolution?
Richardson used simple diffential equations to explain this and other wars as coming from the other side’s armaments and own dissatisfaction with the status quo, while the cost of armaments and war pushes for peace.
A Biased Review of Sociophysics
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