Aramaic

Definitions

  • WordNet 3.6
    • adj Aramaic of or relating to the ancient Aramaic languages
    • n Aramaic an alphabetical (or perhaps syllabic) script used since the 9th century BC to write the Aramaic language; many other scripts were subsequently derived from it
    • n Aramaic a Semitic language originally of the ancient Arameans but still spoken by other people in southwestern Asia
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Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
  • Interesting fact: Some biblical scholars believe that Aramaic (the language of the ancient Bible) did not contain an easy way to say 'many things' and used a term which has come down to us as 40. This means that when the bible -in many places -refers to '40 days,' they meant many days.
    • a Aramaic Pertaining to Aram, or to the territory, inhabitants, language, or literature of Syria and Mesopotamia; Aramæan; -- specifically applied to the northern branch of the Semitic family of languages, including Syriac and Chaldee.
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Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
    • n Aramaic Same as Aramean.
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Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • adj Aramaic ar-a-mā′ik relating to Aramæa, the whole of the country to the north-east of Palestine, or to its language—also Aramē′an, Ar′amite
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Etymology

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
See Aramæan, a

Usage

In literature:

It was always supposed that Christ talked in Aramaic.
"De Profundis" by Oscar Wilde
Are they Egyptian or Babylonian or Aramaic or are they something entirely different?
"Ancient Man" by Hendrik Willem van Loon
It was in three languages, Latin the official tongue, Greek the world tongue, and Aramaic the native tongue.
"Quiet Talks about Jesus" by S. D. Gordon
Aramaic is called 'Chaldee' in the Book of Daniel.
"The Bible in its Making" by Mildred Duff
The list gives us settlers in Britain of Germanic, Gallic, Iberic, Slavonic, Aramaic, and Berber extraction.
"The Ethnology of the British Islands" by Robert Gordon Latham
Scholars are pretty certain that the present Matthew is not a translation of an Aramaic original.
"The Next Step in Religion" by Roy Wood Sellars
In point of language the departures from ordinary Hebrew are almost always in the direction of Aramaic.
"Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 5, Slice 2" by Various
M. Renan goes on to suggest that besides "Mark," "pseudo-Matthew" used an Aramaic version of the Gospel originally set forth in that dialect.
"Essays Upon Some Controverted Questions" by Thomas H. Huxley
It is a Semitic language resembling Aramaic and Hebrew as well as Arabic.
"The New Gresham Encyclopedia" by Various
But "Zealot" is simply a translation into Greek of the Aramaic "Cananaean.
"A Harmony of the Gospels for Students of the Life of Christ" by Archibald Thomas Robertson
The Aramaic text behind 1 Esdras here is better than that behind the canonical Ezra.
"Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 10, Slice 1" by Various
Oertel maintains an Aramaic original,(5) but the greater number of writers consider that the original language was Greek.
"Supernatural Religion, Vol. III. (of III)" by Walter Richard Cassels
Through them the Aramaic culture of Babylonia was transmitted to all parts of the peninsula.
"A Literary History of the Arabs" by Reynold Nicholson
Various attempts have been made to explain the sudden change from Hebrew to Aramaic in ii.
"Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 7, Slice 9" by Various
He also wrote a Hebrew and an Aramaic grammar.
"Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 13, Slice 7" by Various
Various Greek equivalents of this compilation had taken its place where Aramaic was not current.
"The Making of the New Testament" by Benjamin W. Bacon
The villages, of course, spoke Aramaic.
"Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 13, Slice 2" by Various
He gives it in the Aramaic language, and from Ezra iv.
"Expositor's Bible: Ezra, Nehemiah, and Esther" by Walter Adeney
Mark has many Aramaic words, which he translates into Greek; see especially iii, 17; v, 41; vii, 11; vii, 34.
"Sources of the Synoptic Gospels" by Carl S. Patton
An Aramaic letter bearing the date 408 B.C.
"Biblical Geography and History" by Charles Foster Kent
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In poetry:

He yelled at me in Greek,
my God!—It's not his language
and I'm no good at—his Aramaic,
was—I am a monoglot of English
(American version) and, say pieces from
a baker's dozen others: where's the bread?
"Dream Song 48: He yelled at me in Greek" by John Berryman

In news:

Aramaic," errs in stating that "the Gospels of the Christian Bible were recorded in Greek translations" (July 4).
As Jews begin the celebration of Passover on Monday with the ceremonial Seder meal, the Aramaic and Hebrew text known as the Haggadah will be their guide.
While it's not on my bucket list, primarily because I don't have one, it's right up there with mastering Aramaic, but probably not as simple.
Schoolgirls study Aramaic on May 2 in the Arab village of Jish, northern Israel.
The Eastern Catholic Mass was in Arabic, with parts of the liturgy intoned in Syriac—a descendent of Aramaic, the closest thing we have to Jesus' vernacular.
Ancient Aramaic for alcoholic beverage, and profoundly delicious.
France observes that among ancient Greek, Aramaic, and Hebrew inscriptions (including personal names) was "an 'Alexander, Son of Simon,' found in a tomb near Jerusalem probably belonging to a Cyrenian Jewish Family".
AMERICAN scholars have begun work on the world's first comprehensive dictionary of Aramaic, the ancient language presumably spoken by Jesus.
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