apprehension

Definitions

  • WordNet 3.6
    • n apprehension the act of apprehending (especially apprehending a criminal) "the policeman on the beat got credit for the collar"
    • n apprehension the cognitive condition of someone who understands "he has virtually no understanding of social cause and effect"
    • n apprehension painful expectation
    • n apprehension fearful expectation or anticipation "the student looked around the examination room with apprehension"
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Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
    • Apprehension Anticipation, mostly of things unfavorable; distrust or fear at the prospect of future evil. "After the death of his nephew Caligula, Claudius was in no small apprehension for his own life."
    • Apprehension Opinion; conception; sentiment; idea. "To false, and to be thought false, is all one in respect of men, who act not according to truth, but apprehension ."
    • Apprehension The act of grasping with the intellect; the contemplation of things, without affirming, denying, or passing any judgment; intellection; perception. "Simple apprehension denotes no more than the soul's naked intellection of an object."
    • Apprehension The act of seizing or taking by legal process; arrest; as, the felon, after his apprehension, escaped.
    • Apprehension The act of seizing or taking hold of; seizure; as, the hand is an organ of apprehension .
    • Apprehension The faculty by which ideas are conceived; understanding; as, a man of dull apprehension .
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Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
    • n apprehension The act of seizing or taking hold of; prehension: as, the hand is the organ of apprehension.
    • n apprehension The act of arresting or seizing by legal process; arrest; seizure: as, the thief, after his apprehension, escaped.
    • n apprehension A laying hold by the mind; mental grasp; the act or faculty of perceiving anything by the senses;
    • n apprehension of learning or becoming familiar with anything;
    • n apprehension of forming an image in the imagination (the common meaning in English for three centuries, and the technical meaning in the Kantian theory of cognition);
    • n apprehension of catching the meaning of anything said or written;
    • n apprehension of simple apprehension (which see, below);
    • n apprehension of attention to something present to the imagination.
    • n apprehension Anticipation of adversity; dread or fear of coming evil; distrust of the future.
    • n apprehension Alarm, Apprehension, Fright, etc. (see alarm), disquiet, dread, anxiety, misgiving, solicitude, nervousness, fearfulness.
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Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • n Apprehension act of apprehending or seizing: arrest: :
    • n Apprehension (arch.) conscious perception: conception: ability to understand: fear
    • n Apprehension (obs.) sensitiveness, sensibility to
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Quotations

  • Seneca
    Seneca
    “There are more things to alarm us than to harm us, and we suffer more often in apprehension than reality.”
  • F. L. Lucan
    F. L. Lucan
    “The mere apprehension of a coming evil has put many into a situation of the utmost danger.”
  • Alfred North Whitehead
    Alfred%20North%20Whitehead
    “Human life is driven forward by its dim apprehension of notions too general for its existing language.”
  • Sir Isaac Newton
    Sir Isaac Newton
    “A man may imagine things that are false, but he can only understand things that are true, for if the things be false, the apprehension of them is not understanding.”
  • Thomas Traherne
    Thomas%20Traherne
    “Certainly Adam in Paradise had not more sweet and curious apprehensions of the world, than I when I was a child.”
  • Samuel G. Goodrich
    Samuel G. Goodrich
    “How many hopes and fears, how many ardent wishes and anxious apprehensions are twisted together in the threads that connect the parent with the child!”

Etymology

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
L. apprehensio,: cf. F. appréhension,. See Apprehend
Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
L. apprehendĕread, to, prehendĕre, -hensum, to lay hold of.

Usage

In literature:

It was that: a drawing-room in which a man and a woman, and boys and girls, had been on the whole happy, if often apprehensive.
"Clayhanger" by Arnold Bennett
The gradual, almost imperceptible change of manner was observable first to the apprehensive eyes of Stuart Farquaharson himself.
"The Tyranny of Weakness" by Charles Neville Buck
That the "important clue" would lead to the apprehension of the real culprit he did not believe for a moment.
"The Sins of Séverac Bablon" by Sax Rohmer
I cannot think that your apprehensions will be realized.
"Aurelian" by William Ware
He recalled the truth with a gasp of relief which yet was mingled with apprehension.
"Nicanor - Teller of Tales" by C. Bryson Taylor
Among these are apprehensions about his own safety.
"The Death Shot" by Mayne Reid
Our involuntary mirth was of short duration; it was interrupted by an object that filled our hearts with new apprehension.
"The War Trail" by Mayne Reid
No doubt they were under apprehensions that the Panes, their mortal foes, had stolen a march upon them.
"The White Chief" by Mayne Reid
These signs strengthen our feelings of apprehension.
"The Scalp Hunters" by Mayne Reid
Forgive my apprehensions if I am wrong.
"Rookwood" by William Harrison Ainsworth
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In poetry:

that vast cinder wheeled unblinking
in a bath of galaxies. Watching, we traveled
toward an apprehension all but impossible
to be held onto—
"A Hermit Thrush" by Amy Clampitt
There is a rare outlandish root,
Which when I could not get, I thought it here:
That apprehension cur'd so well my foot,
That I can walk to heav’n well neare.
"Faith" by George Herbert
Such threats are, by Britons, too well understood
To create any just apprehensions;
Nor can they, who, in power, accomplish no good,
Now appal us by evil intentions.
"The New-Old Opposition" by George Canning
'T is now that solitude has most of pain;
Vague apprehensions of approaching night
Whisper the soul, attuned to bliss, and fain
To find in love equivalent for light.
"Twilight Thoughts" by Maria Gowen Brooks
Though passing apprehensions move me,
I know thou hast a noble heart;
But, Lucy, I so truly love thee,
So much admire thee as thou art,
That, but the shadow of a fear,
Wakes in my breast a pang sincere.
"Vignette - II" by Matilda Betham
Degrees we know, unknown in days before;
The light is greater, hence the shadow more;
And tantalized and apprehensive Man
Appealing--Wherefore ripen us to pain?
Seems there the spokesman of dumb Nature's
train.
"Epilogue" by Herman Melville

In news:

Stanley the Chihuahua may look a little apprehensive.
In China, confidence clouded by apprehension.
A joint police-FBI criminal apprehension team had been seeking Soto on a murder warrant stemming from a July 4 stabbing in Las Vegas.
Public defender Christine Funk delivered a lecture on forensic science for defense attorney s at a June 8, 2012 training at the Bureau of Criminal Apprehension in St Paul, Minn.
You're prepared, if a little apprehensive.
As the 83rd Legislature slouches toward Austin, hope dances a two-step with apprehension.
Some will tackle things such as painting, wallpaper and staining without apprehension.
We were apprehensive about Glee 's return.
Brian Francis pleaded guilty to damage to unattended vehicles or property and hindering apprehension Monday.
Keith Brissett pleaded guilty to hindering apprehension.
Unless you grew up on a farm, the thought of jumping on the back of a horse stirs up plenty of apprehension in most people.
We're cautiously hopeful but deeply apprehensive.
"We're in the business of making sure that we convict guilty people and, at the same time, exonerate innocent folks," Bureau of Criminal Apprehension Assistant Superintendent Drew Evans tells the Star Tribune.
Cook County Sheriff Mark Falk said he asked the state's Bureau of Criminal Apprehension to launch a criminal investigation into the case.
Clay walker seems a little bit apprehensive about driving a red, vintage model, International pick-up truck while on the set for his newest music video 'Jesus and Jesse James .
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In science:

Wardrop’s traffic equilibrium is strongly tied to the human apprehension of space since it is required that all travellers have enough knowledge of the transport network they use.
Transport Networks Revisited: Why Dual Graphs?
Even in cases where both students have the same incorrect response, co-construction can occur if students are unsure about their initial response and are willing to discuss their apprehensions with peers.
Effectiveness of group interaction on conceptual standardized test performance
As long as these were the only ones to appear in higher loop orders this would state no problem but the intuitive apprehension has proven to be true that for specif ic types of graphs (those with only external B and ¯B lines) the divergences rise with the order.
Gauge Theories on Deformed Spaces
But apprehension arose: No New Physics was seen, while enormous parameter space was excluded for the Higgs boson, the holy grail of LHC physics.
Some Unfinished Thoughts on Strong Yukawa Couplings
After tying a turban on one’s head to tune into the students’ mental ‘vibes’ and allow levitation to occur, a brief meditation moment is taken. The instructor, displaying much hesitation, states his/her apprehension of doing this magical feat and decides to take a bite out of an apple to relax.
Physics Magic
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