anomaly

Definitions

  • WordNet 3.6
    • n anomaly (astronomy) position of a planet as defined by its angular distance from its perihelion (as observed from the sun)
    • n anomaly a person who is unusual
    • n anomaly deviation from the normal or common order or form or rule
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Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
    • Anomaly (Nat. Hist) Any deviation from the essential characteristics of a specific type.
    • Anomaly Deviation from the common rule; an irregularity; anything anomalous. "We are enabled to unite into a consistent whole the various anomalies and contending principles that are found in the minds and affairs of men.""As Professor Owen has remarked, there is no greater anomaly in nature than a bird that can not fly."
    • Anomaly (Astron) The angle measuring apparent irregularities in the motion of a planet.
    • Anomaly (Astron) The angular distance of a planet from its perihelion, as seen from the sun. This is the true anomaly. The eccentric anomaly is a corresponding angle at the center of the elliptic orbit of the planet. The mean anomaly is what the anomaly would be if the planet's angular motion were uniform.
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Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
    • n anomaly Deviation from the common rule or analogy; something abnormal or irregular.
    • n anomaly In astronomy, an angular quantity defining the position of a point in a planetary orbit, taken to increase in the direction of planetary motion. In ancient astronomy it was reckoned from apogee; in early modern astronomy, from aphelion, except in cometary orbits; but since Gauss, from perihelion.
    • n anomaly In music, a small deviation from a perfect interval in tuning instruments with fixed notes; a temperament.
    • n anomaly In mod. astron., the angle at the sun between perihelion and the place of a planet.
    • n anomaly In meteorology, the amount by which a given observed quantity is greater or less than an assumed ideal or normal value; a departure.
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Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • n Anomaly an-om′al-i irregularity: deviation from rule:
    • n Anomaly an-om′al-i (astron.) the angle measured at the sun between a planet in any point of its orbit and the last perihelion
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Quotations

  • Walter Bagehot
    Walter%20Bagehot
    “Poverty is an anomaly to rich people. It is very difficult to make out why people who want dinner do not ring the bell.”

Etymology

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
L. anomalia, Gr. . See Anomalous
Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
Gr. anōmalosa, an, neg., and homalos, even—homos, same.

Usage

In literature:

The anomalies are too obvious.
"Post-Prandial Philosophy" by Grant Allen
On the moon's true anomaly at the time.
"Outlines of a Mechanical Theory of Storms" by T. Bassnett
I acknowledge that this anomaly is perplexing.
"The Uncollected Writings of Thomas de Quincey--Vol. 1" by Thomas de Quincey
A man whom Marcia had never noted until now and who was an anomaly, almost a mystery.
"Judith of Blue Lake Ranch" by Jackson Gregory
This anomaly will be recurred to and explained farther on.
"Continental Monthly , Vol IV, Issue VI, December 1863" by Various
I soon understood the reason of this apparent anomaly.
"Response in the Living and Non-Living" by Jagadis Chunder Bose
The possession of the Trentino by Austria is not alone a geographical and ethnological anomaly: it is a pistol held at the head of Italy.
"Italy at War and the Allies in the West" by E. Alexander Powell
In every instance we find that the characterological anomaly became manifest already during their school career.
"Studies in Forensic Psychiatry" by Bernard Glueck
SUBMARINE AN ANOMALY IN WARFARE.
"Kelly Miller's History of the World War for Human Rights" by Kelly Miller
It's an anomaly nowadays for the employer to live near the employed.
"The Fruit of the Tree" by Edith Wharton
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In news:

I was tempted to inquire about this strategy when I remembered another Searchlight anomaly: The company famously resists inquiries.
BP is being allowed to keep the Macondo well shut in , at least for now, although there are some concerns about a "detected seep a distance from the well and undetermined anomalies at the well head" among other things.
BP is being allowed to keep the Macondo well shut in, at least for now, although there are some concerns about a "detected seep a distance from the well and undetermined anomalies at the well head" among other things.
For residents of Rome, the sight of courting priests is hardly an anomaly.
It's pretty weird to imagine hip hop gracing the singer-songwriter-heavy stage at Cozmic, but who better to be that anomaly than The Coup .
Daylight robbery at ATM 'an anomaly'.
Below is the Sea Surface Temperatures Anomaly graphic.
Officials said an anomaly was determined inside a propane tanker heading from Juarez to El Paso through the Ysleta Port of Entry.
Jeff Glickman points out a small anomaly in a photograph taken shortly after Amelia Earhart went missing in 1937.
It started with a lump — a tiny anomaly with big implications.
New Orleans Saints more ' fragile ' than ever, hope it's just a one-year anomaly: First-take.
Baton Rouge is something of an anomaly as a television market, especially one that happens to be the seat of state, parish (Louisiana's term for county) and city government.
Metal detectors found 17,000 anomalies on the base's Raptor course after an old French weapon was uncovered.
The Parisian jazz vocalist, guitarist and trumpet player is a welcomed anomaly in Miami's sea of musical variations from Latin influences, to Dub Step, to Hip Hop to Reggae to Rock.
Credit is due to the Juke 's low 2932-pound curb weight, an anomaly welcome not only in the crossover segment but also in a new-for-2011 vehicle.
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In science:

Known from the exact solution , this anomaly is the reason why the text-book scattering theory fails: The incoming plane wave and scattered wave cannot be separated and the scattering amplitude cannot be introduced as the ob ject carrying the complete information about scattering .
Paraxial propagation of a quantum charge in a random magnetic field
UA (1) is broken explicitly by instantons or the anomaly. A second U(1) group, UV (1), corresponds to the conservation of baryon number.
Random Matrix Theory and Chiral Symmetry in QCD
An axial U(1) is broken explicitly by instantons or the axial anomaly, as for Nc ≥ 3.
Random Matrix Theory and Chiral Symmetry in QCD
In: Symposium on Anomalies, Geometry and Topology.
Solutions to WDVV from generalized Drinfeld-Sokolov hierarchies
This is the first theory able to predict all known experimental temperature anomalies for water and ice.
Hierarchic Models of Turbulence, Superfluidity and Superconductivity
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