anaphora

Definitions

  • WordNet 3.6
    • n anaphora repetition of a word or phrase at the beginning of successive clauses
    • n anaphora using a pronoun or similar word instead of repeating a word used earlier
    • ***
Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
    • Anaphora A repetition of a word or of words at the beginning of two or more successive clauses.
    • Anaphora the use of a substitute word, such as a pronoun, in reference to a something already mentioned in a discourse; also, the relation between the substitute word and its antecedent. It is contrasted with cataphora, the use of a pronoun for a word or topic not yet mentioned.
    • ***
Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
    • n anaphora In rhetoric, a figure consisting in the repetition of the same word or words at the beginning of two or more succeeding verses, clauses, or sentences: as, “Where is the wise ? where is the scribe ? where is the disputer of this world?” 1 Cor. i. 20.
    • n anaphora In astronomy, the oblique ascension of a star.
    • n anaphora In liturgics, the more solemn part of the eucharistic service: probably so called from the oblation which occurs in it. The anaphora begins with the Sursum Corda, and includes all that follows, that is, the preface, consecration, great oblation, communion, thanksgiving, etc. In some of the more ancient forms it is preceded by a benediction.
    • ***
Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • n Anaphora an′af-or-a (rhet.) the repetition of the same word or phrase in several successive clauses, as in 1 Cor. i. 20.
    • ***

Etymology

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
L., fr. Gr. 'anafora`, fr. 'anafe`rein to carry up or back; 'ana` + fe`rein to carry
Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
Gr.; ana, back, pher-ein, to bear.

Usage


In news:

They assure Catholics who fulfill the conditions to receive Communion consecrated at an Assyrian Eucharist using the Anaphora of Addai and Mari that they are receiving the one true body and blood of Christ.
***

In science:

Work on the generation of pronominal anaphora is somewhat less developed, with researchers often falling back on some notion of focus as the prime determinant of whether pronominalisation is possible; the ma jor problem here is coming up with an independently motivated notion of what it means to be ‘in focus’.
Generating One-Anaphoric Expressions: Where Does the Decision Lie?
Although these treatments differ in a number of respects, both characterise effectively the same syntactic constraints on when one-anaphora is possible: the one form is seen to substitute for a head noun and some number of modifiers of that noun.
Generating One-Anaphoric Expressions: Where Does the Decision Lie?
We can compare these two structures, and allow one-anaphora to be used wherever the type attribute is the same, and zero or more of the other properties are shared.
Generating One-Anaphoric Expressions: Where Does the Decision Lie?
In our expository transition from syntactic substitution to semantic substitution, we have effectively shifted the decision to use one-anaphora further back in the generation process.
Generating One-Anaphoric Expressions: Where Does the Decision Lie?
In Papers from the Thirteenth Regional Meeting of the Chicago Linguistics Society, Chicago. B Webber [1979] A Formal Approach to Discourse Anaphora.
Generating One-Anaphoric Expressions: Where Does the Decision Lie?
Dec lara t ive sen tences can be comb ined by cons truc tors to power fu l compos i te sentences, while certain forms of anaphora and ellipsis leave the language concise and natural . Furthermore , we place interrogative sentences at the user 's disposal for verifying the translated specification text.
Attempto Controlled English (ACE)
Similar to the resolution of anaphora, ellipsis – used to reduce coordination – is handled by syntactical reconstruction.
Attempto Controlled English (ACE)
Automatic resolution of anaphora in English. 1998.
CoZo+ - A Content Zoning Engine for textual documents
Anaphora Resolution: The State of the art. 1999.
CoZo+ - A Content Zoning Engine for textual documents
Cohesion (proper name anaphora, reiteration, synonymy, and hypernymy) and coherence (based on Rhetorical Structure Theory [Mann and Thompson, 1987]) relations between sentences were used in [Mani et al., 1998] to define salience.
MUDOS-NG: Multi-document Summaries Using N-gram Graphs (Tech Report)
These components should aim to improve the overall coherence of the text and tackle problems of anaphora resolution (for examples of such problems see the summary in the appendix section A).
MUDOS-NG: Multi-document Summaries Using N-gram Graphs (Tech Report)
Ideally, the regeneration component contains devices that perform surface repairs on the text by doing anaphora resolution, introducing cohesion markers or choosing the appropriate lexical paraphrases.
Inferring Strategies for Sentence Ordering in Multidocument News Summarization
The primary bottleneck in our system at this time is the parser which only identifies partial parses and does not perform appropriate PP-attachment, conjunct identification, or do anaphora resolution or ellipsis handling.
Towards a PURE Spoken Dialogue System for Information Access
Cohesion is brought about by linguistic devices such as repetition, synonymy, anaphora, and ellipsis.
Machine Learning of Generic and User-Focused Summarization
We present an approach to anaphora resolution based on a focusing algorithm, and implemented within an existing MUC (Message Understanding Conference) Information Extraction system, allowing quantitative evaluation against a substantial corpus of annotated real-world texts.
Evaluating a Focus-Based Approach to Anaphora Resolution
***