aggrandise

Definitions

  • WordNet 3.6
    • v aggrandise add details to
    • ***
Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • v.t Aggrandise ag′grand-īz to make great or larger: to make greater in power, rank, or honour
    • ***

Etymology

Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
Fr., from L. ad, to, and grandis, large.

Usage

In literature:

Did I place there that impulse for aggrandisement which never lets me rest?
"Faustus his Life, Death, and Doom" by Friedrich Maximilian von Klinger
To aggrandise his own name, he had covered Europe with blood.
"Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine, Volume 62, No. 382, October 1847" by Various
Persuaded that the aggrandisement of his family was equivalent in the eyes of Louis XIV.
"Political Women, Vol. 2 (of 2)" by Sutherland Menzies
His attempt to make his daughter-in-law Queen was his last and most aspiring effort at his own aggrandisement.
"Robin Tremayne" by Emily Sarah Holt
A struggle, mind you, not of selfish motives nor for self-aggrandisement, but for Maasau the Free!
"A Modern Mercenary" by Kate Prichard and Hesketh Vernon Hesketh-Prichard
This species of feudality is kept up to aggrandise the corporations at the ruin of towns; and the effect is visible.
"The Writings Of Thomas Paine, Complete" by Thomas Paine
Yet in their spirit was energy, in their hearts a love of conquest and aggrandisement.
"Some Specimens of the Poetry of the Ancient Welsh Bards" by Evan Evans
It was one of aggression and aggrandisement.
"Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 5, Slice 2" by Various
His policy was directed solely to the aggrandisement of Spain.
"History of The Reign of Philip The Second King of Spain" by William H. Prescott
The idea of a union of Germany and Austria presented itself to our minds as an aggrandisement of Germany.
"The New Germany" by George Young
His well-known republican opinions did not harmonise with Bonaparte's schemes of self-aggrandisement.
"Napoleon's Marshals" by R. P. Dunn-Pattison
His policy of imperial aggrandisement had been in progress.
"Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 9, Slice 5" by Various
I directed my leisure hours to the perfection of the plan I had formed for my own aggrandisement.
"First Person Paramount" by Ambrose Pratt
She will then forget the blessings she received from France and Spain, and only think of her own aggrandisement.
"Cuba Past and Present" by Richard Davey
The fact being admitted, what is the position most favourable for these vast plans of aggrandisement?
"Travels in the Steppes of the Caspian Sea, the Crimea, the Caucasus, &c." by Xavier Hommaire de Hell
Another means of the aggrandisement of the estates of the nobles was a fraudulent practice on the part of the common people.
"An Introduction to the History of Japan" by Katsuro Hara
It is too much to pay for any country's aggrandisement.
"The Shadow of the Past" by F.E. Mills Young
But De Guader and Fitzosbern were too proud to give up their hopes of aggrandisement so easily, and, moreover, their case was desperate.
"The Siege of Norwich Castle" by Matilda Maria Blake
In Gradenigo's reign we note the first indication of a policy of territorial aggrandisement on the Italian mainland.
"Venice and its Story" by Thomas Okey
Yet, despite all this, the government was subordinate in Humphrey's eyes to his own personal aggrandisement.
"Humphrey Duke of Gloucester" by K.H. Vickers
***