agglutinative

Definitions

  • WordNet 3.6
    • adj agglutinative united as if by glue
    • adj agglutinative forming derivative or compound words by putting together constituents each of which expresses a single definite meaning
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Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
    • Agglutinative (Philol) Formed or characterized by agglutination, as a language or a compound. "In agglutinative languages the union of words may be compared to mechanical compounds, in inflective languages to chemical compounds.""Cf. man-kind heir-loom war-like , which are agglutinative compounds. The Finnish, Hungarian, Turkish, the Tamul, etc., are agglutinative languages.""Agglutinative languages preserve the consciousness of their roots."
    • Agglutinative Pertaining to agglutination; tending to unite, or having power to cause adhesion; adhesive.
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Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
    • agglutinative Tending or having power to agglutinate or unite; having power to cause adhesion: as, an agglutinative substance.
    • agglutinative In philology, exhibiting or characterized by the formative process known as agglutination; agglutinate (which see): as, an agglutinative language.
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Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • ns Agglutinative a classification formerly much used in contrast to inflectional, to describe such languages as Turkish, which show, in the words of Whitney, an inferior degree of integration in the elements of their words, or of unification of words, the suffixes and prefixes retaining a certain independence of one another and of the root or stem to which they are added
    • adj Agglutinative tending to or having power to cause adhesion
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Etymology

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
Cf. F. agglutinatif,
Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
L. agglutināread, to, gluten, glue. See Glue.

Usage

In literature:

Inflections in general have a half-agglutinative character, the meaning and origin of the affixes and suffixes being palpable.
"History of Phoenicia" by George Rawlinson
Cheeks and foreheads are coated with a rusty paste which agglutinates and cracks.
"Under Fire" by Henri Barbusse
AGGLUTINATE LANGUAGES, languages composed of parts which are words glued together, so to speak, as cowherd.
"The Nuttall Encyclopaedia" by Edited by Rev. James Wood
These refer them to the class of agglutinate tongues, i.e.
"Voyage Of H.M.S. Rattlesnake, Vol. 2 (of 2)" by John MacGillivray
Is the formative slant clearly towards the agglutinative method?
"Language" by Edward Sapir
Agglutinated, glued to the surface.
"The Mushroom, Edible and Otherwise" by M. E. Hard
For they alone instinctively divined the new spirit of the age, which may be termed co-operative and agglutinative.
"England and Germany" by Emile Joseph Dillon
Then these materials are agglutinated by a special secretion.
"The Industries of Animals" by Frédéric Houssay
A score or so of semi-human forms, agglutinated into a mass, and yet individually discernible.
"Astounding Stories of Super-Science, November, 1930" by Various
The inflection of words is effected by agglutination, i.e.
"Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 8, Slice 7" by Various
The Tasmanians spoke a fairly copious agglutinating language, well marked as to parts of speech, syntax and inflexion.
"Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 2, Slice 2" by Various
The main differences shown by these varieties are agglutinative differences.
"Food Poisoning" by Edwin Oakes Jordan
With regard to syntax, the Basque resembles all agglutinative languages.
"Basque Legends" by Wentworth Webster
Tuff, a sand rock formed by agglutinated volcanic rock.
"A Manual of the Antiquity of Man" by J. P. MacLean
The transposition of the agglutinated particles would present no difficulty; cf.
"Man, Past and Present" by Agustus Henry Keane
In the Copepoda they are agglutinated together into masses attached to the body of the female.
"Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 7, Slice 7" by Various
URINE: Dark, straw-colored; orifice seems agglutinated; presses to urinate; urine escapes in divided streams.
"New, Old, and Forgotten Remedies: Papers by Many Writers" by Various
The scales have been compared to agglutinated hairs.
"The Cambridge Natural History, Vol X., Mammalia" by Frank Evers Beddard
In the agglutinative languages, or at any rate in some of them, some of the post-fixed elements have still an independent value.
"Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 14, Slice 4" by Various
Agglutination of the, 312.
"A System of Midwifery" by Edward Rigby
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In news:

Detection of bacterial antigens in body fluids with the Wellcogen Haemophilns influenzae b, Streptococcus penumoniae and Neisseria meningitidis (ACYW135) latex agglutination tests.
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In science:

This language is a Tibeto-Burman language and the distinction from other language Indian is its highly agglutinative nature.
Reduplicated MWE (RMWE) helps in improving the CRF based Manipuri POS Tagger
Section 2 describes about the agglutinative nature of Manipuri which leads us to the idea of stemming. Section 3 gives the idea of Manipuri Reduplicated MWEs, stemming of Manipuri words so that it can be used as a feature is describe in Section 4.
Reduplicated MWE (RMWE) helps in improving the CRF based Manipuri POS Tagger
Number of acceptable standard prefixes as feature: Same is the case for the prefixes thus it also plays an important role too for Manipuri since it is a highly agglutinative language. For every word the number of prefixes are identified during stemming and the number of prefixes is used as a feature.
Reduplicated MWE (RMWE) helps in improving the CRF based Manipuri POS Tagger
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