agglutinate

Definitions

  • WordNet 3.6
    • adj agglutinate united as if by glue
    • v agglutinate clump together; as of bacteria, red blood cells, etc.
    • v agglutinate string together (morphemes in an agglutinating language)
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Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
    • Agglutinate (Physiol) Consisting of root words combined but not materially altered as to form or meaning; as, agglutinate forms, languages, etc. See Agglutination, 2.
    • v. t Agglutinate To unite, or cause to adhere, as with glue or other viscous substance; to unite by causing an adhesion of substances.
    • Agglutinate United with glue or as with glue; cemented together.
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Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
    • agglutinate To unite or cause to adhere, as with glue or other viscous substance; unite by causing an adhesion.
    • agglutinate United as by glue; characterized by adherence or incorporation of distinct parts or elements: as, an agglutinate language. (See below.) In botany, grown together: equivalent to accrete: applied also to fungi that are firmly attached to the matrix. Sometimes written adglutinate.
    • agglutinate In bacterial., to cause the coalescence or clumping of (bacteria or red blood-corpuscles).
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Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • v.t Agglutinate ag-glōōt′in-āt to cause to adhere by glue or cement
    • ns Agglutinate a classification formerly much used in contrast to inflectional, to describe such languages as Turkish, which show, in the words of Whitney, an inferior degree of integration in the elements of their words, or of unification of words, the suffixes and prefixes retaining a certain independence of one another and of the root or stem to which they are added
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Etymology

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
L. agglutinatus, p. p. of agglutinare, to glue or cement to a thing; ad, + glutinare, to glue; gluten, glue. See Glue
Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
L. agglutināread, to, gluten, glue. See Glue.

Usage

In literature:

This serves to agglutinate it into the form of concretions, constituting the tapioca of commerce.
"The Commercial Products of the Vegetable Kingdom" by P. L. Simmonds
One or two instances may suffice to show the agglutinate character of the language.
"The First Landing on Wrangel Island" by Irving C. Rosse
They are agglutinative, and are divided into two branches.
"Russia" by Various
The red globules which desiccation had agglutinated, had become motionless like ships stranded in shoal water.
"The Man With The Broken Ear" by Edmond About
All that is only sensation, if you will; but merely as the agglutinated molecules of cement and of stone are a palace.
"The Mind and the Brain" by Alfred Binet
Agglutinate: stuck or glued together; welded into one mass.
"Explanation of Terms Used in Entomology" by John. B. Smith
In some countries an agglutination of the parts induced by some irritant or a cutting instrument answered the purpose among females.
"History of Circumcision from the Earliest Times to the Present" by Peter Charles Remondino
By the theory the monosyllabic is lower than the agglutinative, and inherently less useful.
"Commentary Upon the Maya-Tzental Perez Codex" by William E. Gates
These may or may not show agglutination when the result of the examination of the 5 per cent.
"The Elements of Bacteriological Technique" by John William Henry Eyre
The Tasmanians spoke a fairly copious agglutinating language, well marked as to parts of speech, syntax and inflexion.
"Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 2, Slice 2" by Various
The main differences shown by these varieties are agglutinative differences.
"Food Poisoning" by Edwin Oakes Jordan
With regard to syntax, the Basque resembles all agglutinative languages.
"Basque Legends" by Wentworth Webster
Tuff, a sand rock formed by agglutinated volcanic rock.
"A Manual of the Antiquity of Man" by J. P. MacLean
The transposition of the agglutinated particles would present no difficulty; cf.
"Man, Past and Present" by Agustus Henry Keane
In the Copepoda they are agglutinated together into masses attached to the body of the female.
"Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 7, Slice 7" by Various
URINE: Dark, straw-colored; orifice seems agglutinated; presses to urinate; urine escapes in divided streams.
"New, Old, and Forgotten Remedies: Papers by Many Writers" by Various
The scales have been compared to agglutinated hairs.
"The Cambridge Natural History, Vol X., Mammalia" by Frank Evers Beddard
In the agglutinative languages, or at any rate in some of them, some of the post-fixed elements have still an independent value.
"Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 14, Slice 4" by Various
Agglutination of the, 312.
"A System of Midwifery" by Edward Rigby
It exhibits the characteristics of an agglutinative language to an extraordinarily complete degree.
"The Tribes and Castes of the Central Provinces of India" by R. V. Russell
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In news:

Detection of bacterial antigens in body fluids with the Wellcogen Haemophilns influenzae b, Streptococcus penumoniae and Neisseria meningitidis (ACYW135) latex agglutination tests.
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In science:

This language is a Tibeto-Burman language and the distinction from other language Indian is its highly agglutinative nature.
Reduplicated MWE (RMWE) helps in improving the CRF based Manipuri POS Tagger
Section 2 describes about the agglutinative nature of Manipuri which leads us to the idea of stemming. Section 3 gives the idea of Manipuri Reduplicated MWEs, stemming of Manipuri words so that it can be used as a feature is describe in Section 4.
Reduplicated MWE (RMWE) helps in improving the CRF based Manipuri POS Tagger
Number of acceptable standard prefixes as feature: Same is the case for the prefixes thus it also plays an important role too for Manipuri since it is a highly agglutinative language. For every word the number of prefixes are identified during stemming and the number of prefixes is used as a feature.
Reduplicated MWE (RMWE) helps in improving the CRF based Manipuri POS Tagger
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