address

Definitions

  • PRESIDENT KRUGER ADDRESSING AMERICAN VOLUNTEERS
    PRESIDENT KRUGER ADDRESSING AMERICAN VOLUNTEERS
  • WordNet 3.6
    • v address adjust and aim (a golf ball) at in preparation of hitting
    • v address speak to "He addressed the crowd outside the window"
    • v address give a speech to "The chairman addressed the board of trustees"
    • v address speak to someone
    • v address put an address on (an envelope)
    • v address act on verbally or in some form of artistic expression "This book deals with incest","The course covered all of Western Civilization","The new book treats the history of China"
    • v address direct a question at someone
    • v address address or apply oneself to something, direct one's efforts towards something, such as a question
    • v address access or locate by address
    • v address greet, as with a prescribed form, title, or name "He always addresses me with `Sir'","Call me Mister","She calls him by first name"
    • n address social skill
    • n address the stance assumed by a golfer in preparation for hitting a golf ball
    • n address (computer science) the code that identifies where a piece of information is stored
    • n address written directions for finding some location; written on letters or packages that are to be delivered to that location
    • n address a sign in front of a house or business carrying the conventional form by which its location is described
    • n address the manner of speaking to another individual "he failed in his manner of address to the captain"
    • n address the act of delivering a formal spoken communication to an audience "he listened to an address on minor Roman poets"
    • n address the place where a person or organization can be found or communicated with
    • ***

Additional illustrations & photos:

Linotype with Scientific American address Linotype with Scientific American address
addressing the ball addressing the ball
Addressing Addressing

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
  • Interesting fact: U.S. Postal Service processes 38 million address changes each year
    • Address A formal communication, either written or spoken; a discourse; a speech; a formal application to any one; a petition; a formal statement on some subject or special occasion; as, an address of thanks, an address to the voters.
    • Address Act of addressing one's self to a person; verbal application.
    • Address Act of preparing one's self.
    • Address Attention in the way one's addresses to a lady.
    • Address Direction or superscription of a letter, or the name, title, and place of residence of the person addressed.
    • Address Manner of speaking to another; delivery; as, a man of pleasing or insinuating address .
    • Address Reflexively: To prepare one's self; to apply one's skill or energies (to some object); to betake. "These men addressed themselves to the task."
    • Address Skill; skillful management; dexterity; adroitness.
    • Address To aim; to direct. "And this good knight his way with me addrest ."
    • Address To clothe or array; to dress. "Tecla . . . addressed herself in man's apparel."
    • Address (Com) To consign or intrust to the care of another, as agent or factor; as, the ship was addressed to a merchant in Baltimore.
    • Address To direct in writing, as a letter; to superscribe, or to direct and transmit; as, he addressed a letter.
    • Address To direct speech to; to make a communication to, whether spoken or written; to apply to by words, as by a speech, petition, etc., to speak to; to accost. "Are not your orders to address the senate?""The representatives of the nation addressed the king."
    • Address To direct speech. "Young Turnus to the beauteous maid addrest ."
    • Address To direct, as words (to any one or any thing); to make, as a speech, petition, etc. (to any one, an audience). "The young hero had addressed his players to him for his assistance."
    • Address To make suit to as a lover; to court; to woo.
    • Address To prepare one's self. "Let us address to tend on Hector's heels."
    • Address To prepare or make ready. "His foe was soon addressed .""Turnus addressed his men to single fight.""The five foolish virgins addressed themselves at the noise of the bridegroom's coming."
    • ***
Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
  • Interesting fact: Kermit the frog delivered the commencement address at Southampton College located in the state of New York in 1996
    • address Primarily, to make direct or straight; straighten, or straighten up; hence, to bring into line or order, as troops (see dress); make right in general; arrange, redress, as wrongs, etc.
    • address N. E. D. To direct in a course or to an end; impart a direction to, as toward an object or a destination; aim, as a missile; apply directly, as action.
    • address To direct the energy or force of; subject to the effort of doing; apply to the accomplishment of: used reflexively, with to: as, he addressed himself to the work in hand.
    • address To direct to the ear or attention, as speech or writing; utter directly or by direct transmission, as to a person or persons: as, to address a warning to a friend, or a petition to the legislature.
    • address To direct speech or writing to; aim at the hearing or attention of; speak or write to: as, to address an assembly; he addressed his constituents by letter.
    • address To apply in speech; subject to hearing or notice: used reflexively, with to: as, he addressed himself to the chairman.
    • address To direct for transmission; put a direction or superscription on: as, to address a letter or parcel to a person at his residence; to address newspapers or circulars.
    • address To direct attentions to in courtship; pay court to as a lover.
    • address To prepare; make ready: often with to or for.
    • address Hence To clothe or array; dress; adorn; trim.
    • address In com., to consign or intrust to the care of another, as agent or factor: as, the ship was addressed to a merchant in Baltimore.
    • address To direct speech; speak.
    • address To make an address or appeal.
    • address To make preparations; get ready.
    • n address Power of properly directing or guiding one's own action or conduct; skilful management; dexterity; adroitness: as, he managed the affair with address.
    • n address Direction or guidance of speech; the act or manner of speaking to persons; personal bearing in intercourse; accost: as, Sir is a title of address; he is a man of good address. Hence The attention paid by a lover to his mistress; courtship; plural (more commonly), the acts of courtship; the attentions of a lover: as, to pay one's addresses to a lady.
    • n address An utterance of thought addressed by speech to an audience, or transmitted in writing to a person or body of persons; usually, an expression of views or sentiments on some matter of direct concern or interest to the person or persons addressed; a speech or discourse suited to an occasion or to circumstances: as, to deliver an address on the events of the day; an address of congratulation; the address of Parliament in reply to the queen's speech.
    • n address A formal request addressed to the executive by one or both branches of a legislative body, requesting it to do a particular thing.
    • n address A direction for guidance, as to a person's abode; hence, the place at which a person resides, or the name and place of destination, with any other details, necessary for the direction of a letter or package: as, what is your present address? the address or superscription on a letter.
    • n address In equity pleading, the technical description in a bill of the court whose remedial power is sought.
    • n address In com., the act of despatching or consigning, as a ship, to an agent at the port of destination.
    • n address Formerly used in the sense of preparation, or the state of preparing or being prepared, and in various applications arising therefrom, as an appliance, array or dress, etc. Synonyms Tact, cleverness.
    • ***
Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
  • Interesting fact: In 1901, Theodore Roosevelt became the only U.S. President in history to deliver his inaugural address without using the word “I”. For the record, Abraham Lincoln, Franklin Roosevelt and Dwight Eisenhower said “I” only once during their speeches.
    • v.t Address ad-dres′ to direct (with to): to speak or write to: to court: to direct in writing: to arrange properly: :
    • n Address a formal communication in writing: a speech: manners: dexterity: direction of a letter:—pl. Address′es, attentions of a lover
    • v.t Address ad-dres′ (arch.) to don
    • v.t Address ad-dres′ (refl.) to turn one's skill or energies towards
    • ***

Quotations

  • George Sand
    George%20Sand
    “The beauty that addresses itself to the eyes is only the spell of the moment; the eye of the body is not always that of the soul.”
  • Ernest Hemingway
    Ernest%20Hemingway
    “It wasn't by accident that the Gettysburg address was so short. The laws of prose writing are as immutable as those of flight, of mathematics, of physics.”
  • Margaret Fuller
    Margaret%20Fuller
    “Essays, entitled critical, are epistles addressed to the public, through which the mind of the recluse relieves itself of its impressions.”
  • Dr. Jerome Brunner
    Dr. Jerome Brunner
    “We are only now on the threshold of knowing the range of the educability of man-the perfectibility of man. We have never addressed ourselves to this problem before.”
  • Carson Mccullers
    Carson Mccullers
    “There's nothing that makes you so aware of the improvisation of human existence as a song unfinished. Or an old address book.”
  • Mother Jones
    Mother Jones
    “My address is like my shoes. It travels with me. I abide where there is a fight against wrong.”

Etymology

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
OE. adressen, to raise erect, adorn, OF. adrecier, to straighten, address, F. adresser, fr. à,L. ad,) + OF. drecier, F. dresser, to straighten, arrange. See Dress (v.)
Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
Fr. adresser—Low L. addirectiāre—L. ad, to, directum, straight. See Dress, Direct.

Usage

In literature:

Forth came Telemachus, by Pallas led, Whom thus the Goddess azure-eyed address'd.
"The Odyssey of Homer" by Homer
Melchior caught the address, and then turned the letter over on the other side, as it lay on the table.
"Japhet in Search of a Father" by Frederick Marryat
Thus the boy finds the simple and homely fact which addressed his senses to be the outcome and flower of the deepest laws.
"Fragments of science, V. 1-2" by John Tyndall
De Courcelle was a man of some address.
"The Rise of Canada, from Barbarism to Wealth and Civilisation" by Charles Roger
I never addressed so large an audience before, and I never was so assisted from heaven in preaching as at this place.
"The Story of My Life" by Egerton Ryerson
His words were addressed rather to her than to Bertha.
"Fairy Fingers" by Anna Cora Mowatt Ritchie
An address was also accepted at Hautsport.
"The Life of King Edward VII" by J. Castell Hopkins
In the lords the address approving the preliminaries was passed without a division.
"The Political History of England - Vol. X." by William Hunt
Until the war ended, if you'd not seen her for a month, you were never quite sure how you ought to address her.
"The Kingdom Round the Corner" by Coningsby Dawson
We address those who seek social intercourse and desire to please.
"How To Behave: A Pocket Manual Of Republican Etiquette, And Guide To Correct Personal Habits" by Samuel R Wells
He held them in his hand with a sheet of blank notepaper bearing an address in Queen Anne Street, Cavendish Square, and a blank form.
"The Stretton Street Affair" by William Le Queux
But Miss Johnson, to whom Ruth particularly addressed herself, had on occasion been unmercifully snubbed by Mrs. Carrington.
"Making People Happy" by Thompson Buchanan
Sarah Owen read an address on woman's place and pay in the world of work.
"History of Woman Suffrage, Volume I"
On the evening of February 27, 1861, she addressed eight hundred people in Concert Hall, Philadelphia.
"History of Woman Suffrage, Volume II"
Lord North was desirous to procure such an address.
"Critical and Historical Essays, Volume III (of 3)" by Thomas Babington Macaulay
Indeed, the man addressed her in French, to which she responded.
"Hushed Up" by William Le Queux
After a time he addressed her in a low voice, the tones of which were tender and full of sadness.
"The Cryptogram" by James De Mille
George F. Hoar, was permitted to address the convention.
"History of Woman Suffrage, Volume III (of III)" by Various
If further testimony were wanting, it might be found in this address, Ad Pontifices.
"The Life of Cicero" by Anthony Trollope
Mrs. Deaves addressed her father-in-law.
"The Deaves Affair" by Hulbert Footner
***

In poetry:

"Refrain, audacious tar.
Your suit from pressing;
Remember what you are,
And whom addressing."
"Fragments" by Louisa May Alcott
"If rightly thou thyself address,
To use their proffer'd aid:
Still unallur'd by idleness,
By labor undismay'd;
"Sir Hornbook" by Thomas Love Peacock
Arise, my soul; awake, my voice,
And tunes of pleasure sing;
Loud hallelujahs shall address
My Savior and my King.
"Hymn 82" by Isaac Watts
In an envelope marked:
PERSONAL
God addressed me a letter. In an envelope marked:
PERSONAL
I have given my answer.
"Personal" by Langston Hughes
"How happy then must Colin be
Who never knew this fear,
Whose sweet address at liberty
Commands the fair-one's ear!
"The Complaint" by Washington Allston
Then let our humble faith address
His mercy and his power;
We shall obtain deliv'ring grace
In the distressing hour.
"Hymn 125" by Isaac Watts

In news:

If you typed the page address in the Address bar, make sure that it is spelled correctly.
Members of the local Democratic Party are upset that an unknown number of ballots in the March primary election may not have been counted because the voters' mailing addresses did not match their addresses on file at their precincts.
Steven Spielberg, who directed the highly-acclaimed movie Lincoln, delivered a keynote address Monday near the site of the 16th president's famed Gettysburg Address , to commemorate its 149th anniversary.
Director Steven Spielberg will deliver the keynote address at an observance commemorating the 149th anniversary of President Abraham Lincoln's Gettysburg Address .
GETTYSBURG, Pa.—Director Steven Spielberg will deliver the keynote address at an observance commemorating the 149th anniversary of President Abraham Lincoln's " Gettysburg Address ," officials said Tuesday.
(AP) — Director Steven Spielberg will deliver the keynote address at an observance commemorating the 149th anniversary of President Abraham Lincoln's Gettysburg Address .
Director Steven Spielberg will deliver the keynote address at an observance commemorating the 149th anniversary of President Abraham Lincoln's " Gettysburg Address ," officials said Tuesday.
President Bush delivers his inaugural address from the steps of the Capitol on Thursday in front of thousands in the stands and on the Mall in Washington, D.C. Bush Delivers Inaugural Address .
The V25 "addresses a lot of the traditional problems with loudspeakers by addressing the problems at the driver engineering level," the PLASA Awards for Innovation judges said.
Since these illnesses are usually caused by a brain malfunction, they (the psychiatric illnesses) must be addressed by addressing the problem.
The Domain Name System helps make a ubiquitous, global Internet practical by providing an infrastructure for mapping labels such as URLs and e-mail addresses to numerical IP addresses.
David Campbell addresses the audience in his keynote address at the Mormon Media Studies Symposium on Thursday.
Entries must include the photo caption, entrant's name, birth date, address, phone number, and e-mail address.
President Obama took to Youtube to answer some questions from people around the country that he didn't address in his State Of The Union Address the other night.
To the person who tried to return to sender an unwanted mailing: If they had crossed out their own home address out and left the senders address in the upper left corner of the envelope they would not have gotten it back.
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In science:

The motivations of this detector approach, the physics to be addressed, the basic experimental design, and the characteristic performance of prototype modules are described.
A CsI(Tl) Scintillating Crystal Detector for the Studies of Low Energy Neutrino Interactions
In subsequent sections, we discuss the motivations for this choice of detector technology, the physics topics to be addressed, the basic experimental design and the prototype performance parameters.
A CsI(Tl) Scintillating Crystal Detector for the Studies of Low Energy Neutrino Interactions
The help system will address how to use the tool.
A GRB Tool Shed
I address here the question of the mutual interplay of strong correlations and disorder in the system. I consider random version of the Hubbard model.
Interplay of Disorder and Correlations
The paper addresses the problem of quantum transport of a charge in an inhomogeneous static random magnetic field.
Paraxial propagation of a quantum charge in a random magnetic field
We address finally the question of diversity.
Random deaths in a computational model for age-structured populations
One of the questions we address is the robustness of this picture based on the dynamics of the eigenvalues of the QCD Dirac operator.
Random Matrix Theory and Chiral Symmetry in QCD
In this article we address the dispersionless limit of generalized Drinfeld - Sokolov hierarchies [GHM, BGHM], associated with (i) non twisted affine Lie algebra ˆg, (ii) its Heisenberg subalgebra H[w ] , corresponding [KP] to regular primitive conjugacy class [w] in W (g), and (iii) regular element Λ from it.
Solutions to WDVV from generalized Drinfeld-Sokolov hierarchies
Now we address the non degeneracy statement.
Solutions to WDVV from generalized Drinfeld-Sokolov hierarchies
Which ones are appropriate depend on the questions being addressed. “Disorder” is not restricted to be the ratio of a nonequilibrium entropy to the corresponding equilibrium entropy; therefore, “simple complexity” need not vanish for all equiibrium systems, nor must it be nonvanishing for a nonequilibrium system.
Response to Comments on "Simple Measure for Complexity"
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Response to Comments on "Simple Measure for Complexity"
In fact, it is possible to have more than one Smax , depending on the question(s) being addressed.
Response to Comments on "Simple Measure for Complexity"
Which one(s) are appropriate depends on the question(s) being addressed.
Response to Comments on "Simple Measure for Complexity"
This result can be used to compare the two ensembles but we will not address this question in this article.
Chiral Random Matrix Model for Critical Statistics
Keynote Address, Sixteenth Symposium on the Interface between Computer Science and Statistics, Elsevier Press, 1984.
Random matrix theory over finite fields: a survey
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