absorption

Definitions

  • WordNet 3.6
    • n absorption the mental state of being preoccupied by something
    • n absorption complete attention; intense mental effort
    • n absorption (chemistry) a process in which one substance permeates another; a fluid permeates or is dissolved by a liquid or solid
    • n absorption (physics) the process in which incident radiated energy is retained without reflection or transmission on passing through a medium "the absorption of photons by atoms or molecules"
    • n absorption the process of absorbing nutrients into the body after digestion
    • n absorption the social process of absorbing one cultural group into harmony with another
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Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
  • Interesting fact: Commercially flavored coffee beans are flavored after they are roasted and partially cooled to around 100 degrees. Then the flavors applied, when the coffee beans' pores are open and therefore more receptive to flavor absorption.
    • Absorption (Chem. & Physics) An imbibing or reception by molecular or chemical action; as, the absorption of light, heat, electricity, etc.
    • Absorption Entire engrossment or occupation of the mind; as, absorption in some employment.
    • Absorption (Physiol) In living organisms, the process by which the materials of growth and nutrition are absorbed and conveyed to the tissues and organs.
    • Absorption The act or process of absorbing or sucking in anything, or of being absorbed and made to disappear; as, the absorption of bodies in a whirlpool, the absorption of a smaller tribe into a larger.
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Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
  • Interesting fact: The color black is produced by the complete absorption of light rays.
    • n absorption The act or process of absorbing, or the state of being absorbed, in all the senses of the verb: as— The act or process of imbibing, swallowing, or engulfing mechanically.
    • n absorption In physiology, the process of taking up into the vascular system (venous or lymphatic) either food from the alimentary canal or inflammatory products and other substances from the various tissues. Plants absorb moisture and nutritive juices principally by their roots, but sometimes by their general surfaces, as in seaweeds, and carbonic acid by their leaves. Absorption of organic matter by leaves takes place in several insectivorous plants.
    • n absorption In Herbart's pedagogic system, the gradual process of the apprehension of the manifold: a translation of the German vertiefung. Otherwise called concentration and self-estrangement.
    • n absorption Specifically— In the absorption of gases, the volume of a gas which one volume of a liquid will dissolve.
    • n absorption In optics, the constant K in the equation , where A0 is the amplitude of an incident ray, A1 its amplitude after penetrating to a depth of one wave-length in the absorbing medium, and e the base of natural logarithms.
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Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • n Absorption the act of absorbing: entire occupation of mind
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Quotations

  • Walter Lippmann
    Walter%20Lippmann
    “The great social adventure of America is no longer the conquest of the wilderness but the absorption of fifty different peoples.”
  • Richard Weaver
    Richard Weaver
    “Absorption in ease is one of the most reliable signs of present or impending decay.”
  • Hugo Ball
    Hugo Ball
    “The symbolic view of things is a consequence of long absorption in images. Is sign language the real language of Paradise?”

Etymology

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
L. absorptio, fr. absorbere,. See Absorb
Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
Fr.—L. ab, from, sorbēre, -sorptum, to suck in.

Usage

In literature:

He sat facing her while she returned with apparent absorption to the fastening of her gloves.
"The Lamp in the Desert" by Ethel M. Dell
He lacks the true innocent absorption in his task which makes happy writing and happy reading.
"The Art of Letters" by Robert Lynd
All her learning came by absorption.
"Little Journeys to the Homes of the Great, Vol. 2 of 14" by Elbert Hubbard
It does not appear that anything but absorption in work was the cause of this neglect.
"McClure's Magazine, Volume VI, No. 3. February 1896" by Various
Mrs. De Peyster listened contemptuously; then with rebellious interest; then with complete absorption.
"No. 13 Washington Square" by Leroy Scott
Desmond put on an air of complete absorption in her drawing; but she smiled.
"The Tree of Heaven" by May Sinclair
The absorption of the liquid begins almost immediately, and, consequently, the level lowers.
"Scientific American Supplement, No. 484, April 11, 1885" by Various
Her self-absorption was without pretence.
"V. V.'s Eyes" by Henry Sydnor Harrison
So profound, so sacred almost, was his absorption that Jewdwine hesitated in his approach.
"The Divine Fire" by May Sinclair
The light here is exhausted in echoes, not extinguished by true absorption.
"Six Lectures on Light" by John Tyndall
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In news:

So far, the absorption of "citizen journalism" into the mainstream news-gathering process has mostly resulted in keeping CNN stocked with shaky (and free.
An error was discovered in ASTM D4637-12 within TABLE 1 under Water absorption, max, mass % for Type III.
Revision of D6583 - 04(2010) Standard Test Method for Porosity of Paint Film by Mineral Oil Absorption.
WK32376 Standard Test Method for Porosity of Paint Film by Mineral Oil Absorption.
It has a very realistic wood look and cushion for shock absorption.
The resulting layer of hydrophobic protection reduces water absorption and the damage that can occur due to freeze-thaw cycles.
They manipulated the bandgap to allow absorption of the low-energy terahertz photons , while also making the electrical resistance in the material depend strongly on temperature.
Melancholy pervades Anne Enright's exquisite novel The Forgotten Waltz, the kind in which self-absorption replaces self-awareness, and self-indulgence trumps pretty much everything else.
Unlike fully pneumatic tires, which provide shock absorption with compressed air, the NU-AIR TYRE does not flatten, eliminating downtime from unexpected punctures .
'Where'd You Go, Bernadette' sends up Seattle self-absorption and first-world angst.
The copy is priceless, vintage Obama self-absorption .
'Age of self-absorption ' is over.
"We've been living in an age of self-absorption But the amazing thing is that on one day it all stopped".
Made with an indigestible form of dextrin or dietary fiber, Pepsi Special is supposed to reduce the absorption of fat in the body from food intake and help lower cholesterol levels.
Corexit® dispersed oil residue accelerates the absorption of toxins into the skin.
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In science:

For a sample derived from absorptions of just a few lines, a temperature solution is generally poorly constrained, and so the argument is frequently made that the most likely temperature is that which results in maximum absorption (or emission), or equivalently, minimum column density.
The magnetic Bp star 36 Lyncis, II. A spectroscopic analysis of its co-rotating disk
Thus, these two parameters are coupled. A uniform disk connected to the star, with ri ≈ 1R∗ , would cause the absorption to appear soon after the faceon phase, i.e., at φ < 0.80, The general absorption profile would then acquire a triangular shape that is not observed.
The magnetic Bp star 36 Lyncis, II. A spectroscopic analysis of its co-rotating disk
A faint but distinct absorption may be present at phases separated from the central lobe maxima; see the feature in the phase range φ = 0.86 – 0.93. A similar out-of-plane absorption is evident at Fig. 7b at φ = 0.40 – 0.48.
The magnetic Bp star 36 Lyncis, II. A spectroscopic analysis of its co-rotating disk
First, the absolute maximum of this absorption curve is only 33% as strong as the absorption in the primary occultation.
The magnetic Bp star 36 Lyncis, II. A spectroscopic analysis of its co-rotating disk
Their absorptions are formed in volumes having nearly the same range of radii as the Hα absorption (i.e., from 3R∗ to 10R∗).
The magnetic Bp star 36 Lyncis, II. A spectroscopic analysis of its co-rotating disk
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