absolve

Definitions

  • WordNet 3.6
    • v absolve let off the hook "I absolve you from this responsibility"
    • v absolve grant remission of a sin to "The priest absolved him and told him to say ten Hail Mary's"
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Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
    • Absolve To finish; to accomplish. "The work begun, how soon absolved ."
    • Absolve To free from a penalty; to pardon; to remit (a sin); -- said of the sin or guilt. "In his name I absolve your perjury."
    • Absolve To resolve or explain. "We shall not absolve the doubt."
    • Absolve To set free, or release, as from some obligation, debt, or responsibility, or from the consequences of guilt or such ties as it would be sin or guilt to violate; to pronounce free; as, to absolve a subject from his allegiance; to absolve an offender, which amounts to an acquittal and remission of his punishment. "Halifax was absolved by a majority of fourteen."
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Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
    • absolve To set free or release, as from some duty, obligation, or responsibility.
    • absolve To free from the consequences or penalties attaching to actions; acquit; specifically, in eccles. language, to forgive or grant remission of sins; pronounce forgiveness of sins to.
    • absolve To accomplish; finish.
    • absolve To solve; resolve; explain.
    • absolve Synonyms To free, release, excuse, liberate, exempt. To acquit, excuse, clear, pardon, forgive, justify. See acquit.
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Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • v.t Absolve ab-zolv′ to loose or set free: to pardon: to acquit: to discharge (with from)
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Quotations

  • Van Wyck Brooks
    Van Wyck Brooks
    “Nothing is so soothing to our self esteem as to find our bad traits in our forebears. It seems to absolve us.”

Etymology

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
L. absolvere, to set free, to absolve; ab, + solvere, to loose. See Assoil Solve
Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
L. ab, from, solvĕre, solutum, to loose. See Solve.

Usage

In literature:

I wish I was a Catholic, and had a father confessor who would hear me and comfort me, and absolve my sins, and keep my secrets!
"Ishmael" by Mrs. E. D. E. N. Southworth
Free is Orestes, from the curse absolv'd!
"Iphigenia in Tauris" by Johann Wolfgang von Goethe
Parliament absolved James on slender grounds.
"A Short History of Scotland" by Andrew Lang
Will you give me a penance and absolve me?
"The Broken Soldier and the Maid of France" by Henry Van Dyke
But since you sincerely repent, I freely absolve you.
"The Lost Lady of Lone" by E.D.E.N. Southworth
Whatever solemn promises Ferdinand might make, the pope would absolve him from all sin in violating them.
"The Empire of Austria; Its Rise and Present Power" by John S. C. Abbott
Now he was not afraid to meet those eyes, and in them he read that he was absolved.
"The Northern Light" by E. Werner
The democratic theory which seeks to absolve humanity from oppression, is not confined to the resistance of a single despot.
"Continental Monthly, Vol. II. July, 1862. No. 1." by Various
Our Absolver may apply this now as he pleases.
"Essays on the Stage" by Thomas D'Urfey and Bossuet
You will be able to absolve with a clear conscience.
"Renaissance in Italy, Volumes 1 and 2" by John Addington Symonds
Your condition does not absolve you from your moral obligation.
"Walker's Appeal, with a Brief Sketch of His Life" by David Walker and Henry Highland Garnet
It did not absolve a man from weariness or scars.
"Poor Man's Rock" by Bertrand W. Sinclair
The historian at once absolves the gentler sex from any share of blame.
"Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine, Volume 54, No. 337, November, 1843" by Various
I will both shrive and absolve you in return for the filthy lucre!
"The Black Douglas" by S. R. Crockett
Not even Anthony Cardew could absolve me from what they bound me to.
"The Story of Bawn" by Katharine Tynan
This would have been a desperate step indeed; nor could her conduct in withholding subsequent explanations be absolved of heartlessness.
"The Haunters & The Haunted" by Various
Since the matter in question is to absolve victory, it is placed on trial.
"The Heavenly Father" by Ernest Naville
God has not wanted to absolve without the Church.
"Pascal's Pensées" by Blaise Pascal
The priest absolves them, and they begin to mount.
"The Long Night" by Stanley Weyman
But a man may be absolved from a promise.
"Can You Forgive Her?" by Anthony Trollope
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In poetry:

When he in heav'n dooms me to dwell,
Then I adjudge myself to hell;
Yet still I to his judgement 'gree,
And clear him for absolving me.
"The Believer's Riddle; or, the Mystery of Faith" by Ralph Erskine
Thus free I am, yet still involv'd;
A guilty sinner, yet absolv'd;
Though pardon leave no guilt behind,
Yet sin's desert remains I find.
"The Believer's Riddle; or, the Mystery of Faith" by Ralph Erskine
"Now, woful pilgrim, say not so!
But kneel thee down to me,
And shrive thee so clean of thy deadly sin,
That absolved thou mayst be."—
"The Gray Brother" by Sir Walter Scott
Yet free of guilt it did him see;
Hence fully clear'd, and set him free.
Yet had not guilt his soul involv'd,
By law he could not been absolv'd.
"The Believer's Principles : Chap. II." by Ralph Erskine
O great Absolver, grant my soul may wear
The lowliest garb of penitence and prayer,
That in the FATHER'S courts my glorious dress
May be the garment of Thy righteousness.
"I Believe In The Forgiveness Of Sins" by Samuel John Stone
Religion in this wise, enlightened day,
Is free to all, that is, if all have gold;
The vilest sinner is absolved for pay,
And to him wide the grand church-doors unfold.
But woe to him who fain would enter in
The gilded fold, whose poverty's his sin.
"A Broadway Idyl" by Mary Eliza Perine Tucker Lambert

In news:

Susan Beck's Summary Judgment: Stoker Jury Foreman Explains How Verdict Didn't Absolve Citi.
It only appeases the moment, absolves culpability and allows for repeats.
I want to live in a world where if you admit guilt, you should be absolved of your crime.
McGinn was not absolved, and his appeals are up.
But there is no technology that can absolve us of our personal responsibility to be less wasteful.
Just because Gunner Kiel should still be in high school right now does not mean he is absolved from the tantrums each of his current teammates have received at one point or another.
After giving Oracle a bit of a win in round one of the case, a federal jury found in favor of Google in Round 2, absolving the search giant of infringing on Oracle's Java patents.
If you are a comedic journalist , then, are you absolved if you blatantly steal jokes.
How mobile devices can absolve journalism of its original sin: giving away online content.
LEGAL BRIEFING - ' Harmless error' does not absolve credit debt.
A judge's order that absolved Texas counties from purging potentially dead people from voter rolls before the November election is being challenged by state prosecutors.
Congress voted to hold Holder in contempt, but an inspector general investigation absolved him of wrongdoing.
Manchester City's Vincent Kompany absolves himself and Joe Hart of blame for 'outstanding' Cristiano Ronaldo's last-minute winner for Real Madrid.
Manchester City's Vincent Kompany absolves himself and Joe Hart of blame for 'outstanding' Cristiano Ronaldo's last-minute winner for Real Madrid .
If the new anti-obesity drug Xenical is approved, as a Food and Drug Administration panel urged last week, does it mean Americans can pig out at McDonald's, then pop a pill to absolve them of their bodily sins.
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In science:

Central is the expansion of the amplitudes and relevant function in an orthogonal basis with known dispersion integrals, which absolves one from doing any singular integration.
Three particle states and t-exchanges
Thus we absolve any problems with frequentist derivations of weak probabilities that lie outside the interval [0, 1] or even outside the set of real numbers.
Weak Values and Relational Generalisations
This tentatively absolves problems we have with deriving such notions, and with deriving probabilities themselves, using orthodox statistics.
Weak Values and Relational Generalisations
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