abiogenesis

Definitions

  • WordNet 3.6
    • n abiogenesis a hypothetical organic phenomenon by which living organisms are created from nonliving matter
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Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
    • n Abiogenesis (Biol) The supposed origination of living organisms from lifeless matter; such genesis as does not involve the action of living parents; spontaneous generation; -- called also abiogeny, and opposed to biogenesis. "I shall call the . . . doctrine that living matter may be produced by not living matter, the hypothesis of abiogenesis ."
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Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
    • n abiogenesis In biology, the production of living things otherwise than through the growth and development of detached portions of a parent organism; spontaneous generation. Abiogenesis was formerly supposed to prevail quite widely even among comparatively complex forms of life. It is now proved that it occurs, if at all, only in the simplest microscopic organisms, and the weight of evidence is adverse to the claim that it has been directly demonstrated there. The tendency of recent biological discussion, however, is toward the assumption of a process of natural conversion of non-living into living matter at the dawn of life on this earth. Also called abiogeny. See biogenesis and heterogenesis.
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Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • n Abiogenesis ab-i-o-jen′es-is the origination of living by not-living matter, spontaneous generation
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Etymology

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
Gr. 'a priv. + bi`os life + ge`nesis, origin, birth
Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
Coined by Huxley in 1870; Gr. a, neg., bios, life, genesis, birth.

Usage

In literature:

Abiogenesis, Huxley's address on Biogenesis and.
"More Letters of Charles Darwin Volume II" by Charles Darwin
ABIOGENESIS, the doctrine of spontaneous generation.
"The Nuttall Encyclopaedia" by Edited by Rev. James Wood
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In news:

Do scientists think it likely that abiogenesis is possible.
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In science:

Indeed, while macroscopic energy flow in the metabolic reaction cycles can be mapped to that in similar organic attractors in abiogenesis, we still need a mapping -- albeit in terms of inorganic matter-- for the control-network (level-I) capable of microscopic energy transactions.
Field-control, phase-transitions, and life's emergence
Despite the low levels of bisulphide in alkaline solutions, (Mielke et al. 2010) have shown the potential of the hydrothermal solution to dissolve sulphydryl ions from sulphides in the crust that are expected to flow over ~30,000 years-- fulfilling the continuity of conditions required for abiogenesis.
Field-control, phase-transitions, and life's emergence
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