abhorrer

Definitions

  • WordNet 3.6
    • n abhorrer a signer of a 1679 address to Charles II in which those who petitioned for the reconvening of parliament were condemned and abhorred
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Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
    • n Abhorrer One who abhors.
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Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
    • n abhorrer One who abhors. Specifically (with or without a capital letter), in the reign of Charles II. of England, a member of the court party, afterward called Tories. They derived their name from their professed abhorrence of the principles of the Addressers, who endeavored to restrict the royal prerogative. See addresser.
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Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • ns Abhorrer one who abhors
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Quotations

  • Malcolm Muggeridge
    Malcolm%20Muggeridge
    “There's nothing is this world more instinctively abhorrent to me than finding myself in agreement with my fellow-humans.”
  • James Joyce
    James%20Joyce
    “There is no heresy or no philosophy which is so abhorrent to the church as a human being.”
  • Winston Churchill
    Winston%20Churchill
    “Nothing can be more abhorrent to democracy than to imprison a person or keep him in prison because he is unpopular. This is really the test of civilization.”
  • Benjamin Disraeli
    Benjamin%20Disraeli
    “The question is this -- Is man an ape or an angel? My Lord, I am on the side of the angels. I repudiate with indignation and abhorrence these new fanged theories.”
  • Winston Churchill
    Winston%20Churchill
    “Nothing can be more abhorrent to democracy than to imprison a person or keep him in prison because he is unpopular. This is really the test of civilisation.”

Etymology

Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
L. abhorrēre, from ab, from, and horrēre. See Horror.

Usage

In literature:

They have combined, also, to speak of Catiline with abhorrence.
"Life of Cicero" by Anthony Trollope
There was accusation, denunciation, abhorrence in the cashier's gaze.
"Thoroughbreds" by W. A. Fraser
Religious abhorrence was added to racial hatred.
"The Story of the Malakand Field Force" by Sir Winston S. Churchill
It legalized the most abhorrent system of robbery which ever cursed the family of man.
"The Works of Whittier, Volume VII (of VII) The Conflict With Slavery, Politics and Reform, The Inner Life and Criticism" by John Greenleaf Whittier
It legalized the most abhorrent system of robbery which ever cursed the family of man.
"The Complete Works of Whittier The Standard Library Edition with a linked Index" by John Greenleaf Whittier
Declares her abhorrence of him.
"Clarissa, Volume 2 (of 9)" by Samuel Richardson
I leave in disgrace; my once good name is now blighted and withered; my old friends will look upon me with abhorrence.
"Life in London" by Edwin Hodder
Shelley however had not the usual feeling of repulsion or abhorrence for snakes and serpents.
"Adonais" by Shelley
He held idolatry of all kinds in supreme abhorrence.
"Beacon Lights of History, Volume V" by John Lord
Their treatment, if considered in this light, will equally excite our pity and abhorrence.
"An Essay on the Slavery and Commerce of the Human Species, Particularly the African" by Thomas Clarkson
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In poetry:

Contented ever thou didst finde
Me with thy scornes, though never (for
To say the trueth) I joyed in minde,
After thou didst my love abhorre.
"His Last Replie" by Bartholomew Young
Have faith, hapless one, I will pardon and free,
Not always shalt thou be abhorrent to Me,
But be Mine e'en as I shall return unto thee,
'Tis yet but a little space longer.
"God And Israel" by Shlomo ibn Gabirol
The courtier's cringe, the flatt'rer's abject smile,
The subtle arts of well-dissembled praise,
Thy soul abhorr'd;­above the gloss of guile,
Truth lead thy steps, and Friendship crown'd thy days.
"Elegy to the Memory of David Garrick, Esq." by Mary Darby Robinson
"Where is the bridge that is most broad?
What is, by man, the most abhorr'd?
Where leads, where leads, the highest road up?
And say, where the hottest of drink they sup."
Look out, look out, Svend Vonved.
"Svend Vonved" by George Borrow
"Ice is, of bridges, the bridge most broad.
The toad is, of all things, the most abhorr'd.
To paradise leads the highest road up:
And in hell the hottest of drink they sup."
Look out, look out, Svend Vonved.
"Svend Vonved" by George Borrow
No thought of scornful anger within His bosom burned,
Nor, with abhorrent gesture, His face from her He turned;
But as His gaze of purity dwelt on her, searching, meek,
Her bright eyes fell, and blushes hot burned on her brow and cheek.
"Our Saviour And The Samaritan Woman At The Well" by Rosanna Eleanor Leprohon

In news:

Billboard Comparing Obama to Colorado Shooting Suspect Called ' Abhorrent '.
PM opposes ' abhorrent ' whale research.
The problem with clichés, we've found, is the same problem that crops up around stereotypes: Their abhorrent existence is made all the more awful by those who reinforce them.
It's a shame that Mark Fabian in his Tuesday letter would find altruistic, selfless and much- needed Christian mission efforts so abhorrent.
'OK, we welcome you, but our God thinks that what you are is abhorrent.
Based on Barber 's recantation and what he called "abhorrent" behavior by Ebert, the federal judge in Norfolk eventually overturned Wolfe's conviction and death sentence, and sent the case back to Prince William for a retrial.
Coming in as the basketball shot heard around the world, this guy makes Shaq's abhorrent excuse for a free throw look like a game-winning miracle.
We jail people when we have despaired of any other way of dealing with their abhorrent behavior.
The term "entitlement" is abhorrent to me.
Judge's abhorrent, familiar views on 'technical' rape earn rebuke.
This shift upset the balance between men and women initiating the disappearance of goddesses , the abhorrence of images, and, in literacy's early stages, the decline of women's political status.
One of the most abhorrent expressions of intolerance is the dismissal of another people's food.
Judge 's abhorrent, familiar views on 'technical' rape earn rebuke.
Charles Lindbergh 's abhorrence of any display of emotion or weakness took a toll on his family.
"I prefer to be true to myself, even at the hazard of incurring the ridicule of others, rather than to be false, and to incur my own abhorrence,"— Frederick Douglass.
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