Zoroastrianism

Definitions

  • WordNet 3.6
    • n Zoroastrianism system of religion founded in Persia in the 6th century BC by Zoroaster; set forth in the Zend-Avesta; based on concept of struggle between light (good) and dark (evil)
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Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
    • n Zoroastrianism The religious system of Zoroaster, the legislator and prophet of the ancient Persians, which was the national faith of Persia; mazdeism. The system presupposes a good spirit (Ormuzd) and an opposing evil spirit (Ahriman). Cf. Fire worship, under Fire, and Parsee.
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Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
    • n Zoroastrianism The system of religious doctrine taught by Zoroaster and his followers in the Avesta; the religion prevalent in Persia till its overthrow by the Mohammedans in the seventh century, and still held by the Guebers and Parsees, and commonly, though incorrectly, called fire-worship. The religion is dual, recognizing two creative powers—Ormuzd (Ahuramazda), the god of light and creator of all that is good, with six principal and innumerable inferior amshaspands, or ministers of good, and Ahriman (Angramainyus), the god of darkness and creator of evil, with a corresponding number of devs, or ministers of evil. Zoroaster taught that Ormuzd created man with free will; that his state after death depends upon the preponderance of good or evil in his life, an intermediate state being provided for those in whom these principles are evenly balanced; and that Ormuzd will finally prevail over Ahriman in the constant war between them, and redeem him and his ministers, as well as man, from all evil.
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Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • n Zoroastrianism zor-ō-as′tri-an-izm the ancient religion founded or reformed by Zoroaster—the Greek pronunciation of Zarathushtra—set forth in the Zend-Avesta (q.v.), and still held by the Guebres and Parsees in India
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Usage

In literature:

For an interesting resume of Zoroastrianism, see Laing, A Modern Zoroastrian, chap.
"History of the Warfare of Science with Theology in Christendom" by Andrew Dickson White
In the old Egyptian and Zoroastrian story, appear the descriptions of two Trees of Life, also a Tree of Knowledge.
"The God-Idea of the Ancients" by Eliza Burt Gamble
But that, perhaps, was a corruption of the purer and older Zoroastrian creed.
"Historical Lectures and Essays" by Charles Kingsley
AH`RIMAN, the Zoroastrian impersonation of the evil principle, to whom all the evils of the world are ascribed.
"The Nuttall Encyclopaedia" by Edited by Rev. James Wood
Islam, Judaism, Christianity, and in allied religions, such as Zoroastrianism.
"Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 2, Part 1, Slice 1" by Various
In Persia itself the Zoroastrian faith is now almost extinct, but small colonies still survive in the towns of Yezd and Kerman.
"The Tribes and Castes of the Central Provinces of India--Volume I (of IV)" by R.V. Russell
The opposition of good and evil is most fully carried out in Zoroastrianism.
"Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 8, Slice 3" by Various
How did he discover that the Magi, or priests of the Zoroastrian religion, were really Buddhists and came from India?
"Flowers of Freethought" by George W. Foote
But that, perhaps, was a corruption of the purer and older Zoroastrian creed.
"Lectures Delivered in America in 1874" by Charles Kingsley
He has been called a Zoroastrian, because he recognised in the sun the sign of the presence of the Almighty.
"Rulers of India: Akbar" by George Bruce Malleson
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In news:

There's a misconception amongst many that, you know, Zoroastrians are fire worshipers.
Light is very significant in the Zoroastrian religion, and it's a sign of knowledge and wisdom.
Predating Christianity and Islam, Zoroastrianism has existed for nearly 3,000 years and now faces a threatening decline in followers.
From a wiki about Adele to one on Zoroastrianism, there seems no end to the well of editable online knowledge, writes Rhodri Marsden.
A n interfaith panel of representatives of Jewish, Hindu, Christian, Muslim, Buddhist, Sikh and Zoroastrian religions discussed their beliefs March 7 on the campus of Bishop Montgomery High School in Torrance.
Tradition has it that Isfahan's Friday mosque sits on what was once a Zoroastrian Fire Temple.
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