Zorilla

Definitions

  • Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
    • n Zorilla (Zoöl) Either one of two species of small African carnivores of the genus Ictonyx allied to the weasels and skunks.☞ The best-known species (Ictonyx zorilla) has black shiny fur with white bands and spots. It has anal glands which produce a very offensive secretion, similar to that of the skunk. It feeds upon birds and their eggs and upon small mammals, and is often very destructive to poultry. It is sometimes tamed by the natives, and kept to destroy rats and mice. Called also mariput Cape polecat, and African polecat. The name is sometimes erroneously applied to the American skunk.
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Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
    • n zorilla A genus of African skunk-like quadrupeds, representing the subfamily Zorillinæ. The common zoril, or mariput, is Z. striata (or Ictonyx zorilla), a nocturnal, burrowing, carnivorous animal, capable of emitting a very fetid odor, like a skunk. It is as large as a small house-cat, and is entirely striped and spotted with black and white, thus closely resembling the small American skunk figured under Spilogale. The genus is also called Rhabdogale and Ictonyx. Its name Zorilla is quite recent; but zorilla as a specific New Latin name is more than a century old, haviug long designated a composite species in which the African zoril was confounded with some American skunks: whence also the two senses of zoril (which see).
    • n zorilla [lowercase] A zoril.
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Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • n Zorilla a genus of African skunk-like quadrupeds, representing the Zorillinæ, an African subfamily of Mustelidæ
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Etymology

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
Sp. zorilla, zorillo, dim. of zorra, zorro, a fox: cf. F. zorille,
Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
Fr. zorille—Sp. zorilla, dim. of zorra, a fox.

Usage

In literature:

Zorilla alone, looking upon it as a sham, retired to France in disgust.
"Spanish Life in Town and Country" by L. Higgin and Eugène E. Street
As a poet he was imitative, reminding us of Quintana, Zorilla, and Byron.
"The New Gresham Encyclopedia. Vol. 1 Part 3" by Various
Senor Juan Ramon Zorilla rose to defend his absent relative.
"Romantic Spain" by John Augustus O'Shea
Perhaps you may have to go back into the bath a second time before Zorilla gets to the real work.
"The City in the Clouds" by C. Ranger Gull
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