Yorkist

Definitions

  • Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • n Yorkist one of this party
    • ***

Usage

In literature:

John Howard, the issue of this marriage, was a prominent Yorkist and stood high in the favour of the Yorkist kings.
"History of the English People, Volume III (of 8)" by John Richard Green
He was of the Yorkist party.
"Margaret of Anjou" by Jacob Abbott
A gipsy finds a little girl in the forest of Wimbourne, after the sacking of the castle by the Yorkists.
"Condemned as a Nihilist" by George Alfred Henty
The victory was gained to the Yorkists chiefly by the help of Warwick.
"Great Men and Famous Women. Vol. 1 of 8" by Various
When, however, a son was born, the Londoners became openly and unreservedly Yorkists.
"The History of London" by Walter Besant
The Yorkists spent the winter in preparing for war.
"A Student's History of England, v. 1 (of 3)" by Samuel Rawson Gardiner
Once it even appeared as if a Yorkist movement might be combined with the religious agitation.
"A History of England Principally in the Seventeenth Century, Volume I (of 6)" by Leopold von Ranke
There were several Battles between the Yorkists and Lancastrians, in which the former (as they ought) usually conquered.
"The Complete Project Gutenberg Works of Jane Austen" by Jane Austen
Now, Sir Daniel, having once more joined him to the Queen's party, is in ill odour with the Yorkist lords.
"The Works of Robert Louis Stevenson - Swanston Edition Vol. 8 (of 25)" by Robert Louis Stevenson
VI., who was slain whilst fighting on the part of the Yorkists, at the battle of Wakefield, A.D.
"Notes and Queries, Number 228, March 11, 1854" by Various
***

In poetry:

For Lancaster Sir Philip rose,
And many a Yorkist slew;
Till, singling him amidst his foes,
Lord Hubert's arrow flew.
"Edgar And Ellen" by Matilda Betham