Worm-cast

Definitions

  • Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • n Worm-cast the earth voided by the earthworm
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Etymology

Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
A.S. wyrm, dragon, snake, creeping animal; cog. with Goth. waurms, a serpent, Ice. ormr, Ger. wurm; also with L. vermis.

Usage

In literature:

Then one long gloating look he cast upon his victim, and turning, wormed his way with difficulty up the tree.
"Peter Pan" by James M. Barrie
Jacquet in that office was like a glow-worm, casting his light upon those secret correspondences, deciphering and classifying despatches.
"Ferragus" by Honore de Balzac
Jacquet in that office was like a glow-worm, casting his light upon those secret correspondences, deciphering and classifying despatches.
"The Thirteen" by Honore de Balzac
A lingering and grovelling baseness in the average heart delights in this sort of cast-off clothes of fellow-worms.
"Bits About Home Matters" by Helen Hunt Jackson
Unfortunately the ball lay thirty feet away, and the path to the hole was bumpy and riddled with worm-casts.
"Murder in Any Degree" by Owen Johnson
Here the ground was thickly strewed with large, naked stones, and worm-castings were almost wholly absent.
"A Book of Natural History" by Various
I had rather see a worm cast its skin than see a king crowned.
"The Last Harvest" by John Burroughs
The whole of his little soul was centred on the oily pool into which he had just cast the bunch of worms.
"The Crew of the Water Wagtail" by R.M. Ballantyne
Lie there, more like a worm than man; she cast it Upon his head.
"The Works of Lord Byron" by Lord Byron
It was a worm-cast, sir, a cast of a worm, and you had no right to remove it.
"Miss Mapp" by Edward Frederic Benson
Then one long gloating look he cast upon his victim, and turning, wormed his way with difficulty up the tree.
"Peter and Wendy" by James Matthew Barrie
Dung, worm-casts, or mole-hills may be removed (but not pressed down) without penalty.
"The Complete Golfer [1905]" by Harry Vardon
A strong decoction of walnut tree leaves thrown upon the ground where there are worm casts, will cause them to rise up.
"The Cook and Housekeeper's Complete and Universal Dictionary; Including a System of Modern Cookery, in all Its Various Branches," by Mary Eaton
At night the worm comes to the surface, and casts out the pellets of earth swallowed.
"Earth and Sky Every Child Should Know" by Julia Ellen Rogers
The candle-worms cast a gentle sheen on the golden sanded walls.
"The Three Mulla-mulgars" by Walter De La Mare
So he set himself to work, with characteristic contempt of time, to weigh and measure worms and worm-castings.
"Charles Darwin" by Grant Allen
Down in the compound glow-worms showed, looking like a lot of smouldering cigarette ends cast carelessly aside.
"A Son of the Sahara" by Louise Gerard
My own line I baited with angle-worm, and together we cast out into the slow, deep current.
"Cardigan" by Robert W. Chambers
More obvious are the worm-casts in sand left by the sand-dwelling marine annelids.
"Stories of the Universe: Animal Life" by B. Lindsay
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In poetry:

Learn of the adder, though a worm, to cast
Each pois'nous passion from thy breast in haste,
Ere to approach God's altar thou dost dare;
Lest those fierce passions shou'd destroy thee, there:
"A Preparation For The Holy Communion" by Rees Prichard

In news:

It sounds a bit like Halloween magic: making tea from worm castings, decontaminating water with electricity, converting animal waste into "black gold," and a gadget that turns anything drinkable into soda pop.
But as members of the C-level cast run from supernatural sand worms, there's only so far it can go, and that means downshifting into a redneck "Tremors" rip-off for its final third.
It's not the yummiest topic, but let's talk about worm castings.
In response to an article in Wednesday's paper about the popularity of vegetable gardening, I received a question about worm castings, also known as vermicast.
Worms eat kitchen scraps and create worm castings, which are a valuable soil amendment and plant tonic.
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