Winter's-bark

Definitions

  • Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • n Winter's-bark win′tėrs-bärk a stimulant, aromatic, and tonic bark, named from Captain Winter, who first brought it from the Strait of Magellan in 1579.
    • ***

Usage

In literature:

Humming-birds may be seen sucking the flowers, and parrots feeding on the seeds of the Winter's Bark, in latitude 55 degrees south.
"A Naturalist's Voyage Round the World" by Charles Darwin
But the dog's bark and the sound once or twice of the child's voice speaking to him came clearly through the still winter air.
"The Rectory Children" by Mrs Molesworth
Yesterday in my walk I saw where a red squirrel had stripped the soft outer bark off a group of red cedars to build its winter's nest with.
"Ways of Nature" by John Burroughs
Parrots are found as far south as Tierra del Fuego, where Darwin saw them feeding on seeds of the Winter's bark.
"Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 6, Slice 2" by Various
That's a fine piece o' winter bark ye put on to her, Tom.
"The Secret Trails" by Charles G. D. Roberts
It feeds principally upon the seeds of the Winter's-bark.
"Narrative of the surveying voyages of His Majesty's ships Adventure and Beagle, between the years 1826 and 1836" by Robert FitzRoy
They were snugly housed with plenty of tender bark for their winter's food, so the wind might howl, and the frost freeze.
"Shaggycoat" by Clarence Hawkes
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In poetry:

The mighty eucalyptus tree
But sheds its bark at winter's call
Its leaves retain their greenery,
And yield a curing oil for all.
"The Trees" by Abner Cosens