Whipping-cheer

Definitions

  • Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • Whipping-cheer (Shak.) chastisement
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Etymology

Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
M. E. whippen; prob. a form of wippen—Old Dut. wippen, to shake, conn. with Old High Ger. wipph, swinging motion (Ger. weifen, to move), and akin to L. vibrāre, to tremble.

Usage

In literature:

The whips cracked and the crowd scattered and cheered as we broke into a gallop for home.
"Dream Days" by Kenneth Grahame
Applauding benches of Imperialists cheered me on my way to the table between the whips.
"The New Machiavelli" by Herbert George Wells
The whips cracked and the crowd scattered and cheered as we broke into a gallop for home.
"Dream Days" by Kenneth Grahame
Or shall he have the cheer of whipping and stripes, as befitteth a thrall to whom the master oweth a grudge?
"The Story of the Glittering Plain or the Land of Living Men" by William Morris
It draws its load cheerfully, and is patient of the bit and of the whip.
"The Professor at the Breakfast Table" by Oliver Wendell Holmes (Sr.)
There was a cheer from the crowd; the driver whipped his horse; they darted East again.
"The Country House" by John Galsworthy
And when he put old Diamond between the shafts, got his whip, and jumped up on the box, the men broke into a cheer.
"At the Back of the North Wind" by Elizabeth Lewis and George MacDonald
Hell is the place where whipping-cheer abounds, II.
"The Hesperides & Noble Numbers: Vol. 1 and 2" by Robert Herrick
He would crack his whip, and cheer on his horses, and make noise and uproar enough to frighten half the town.
"Rollo in Geneva" by Jacob Abbott
Early next morning the crack of a whip was heard, and Calvin Parks's voice, shouting cheerfully for his passenger.
""Some Say"" by Laura Elizabeth Howe Richards
Whip and spur, guide and cheer!
"Calavar" by Robert Montgomery Bird
The men erupted with a cheer and whipped their hats into the air.
"Caribbee" by Thomas Hoover
The whips cracked and the crowd scattered and cheered as we broke into a gallop for home.
"Dream Days" by Kenneth Grahame
A cheering word or a timely touch of the whip seemed once or twice to avert catastrophe.
"The Outspan" by Percy Fitzpatrick
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In news:

) Many miles down the road, finally baked and topped with whipped cream, the pie drew cheers even from the pumpkin-pie -haters in the group, who turned out to be most at the table.
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