Ulva

Definitions

  • WordNet 3.6
    • n Ulva type genus of the family Ulvaceae; green seaweed having a thallus two cells thick: sea lettuce
    • ***
Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
    • prop. n Ulva (Bot) A genus of thin papery bright green seaweeds including the kinds called sea lettuce.
    • ***
Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
    • n ulva A genus of algæ, typical of the order Ulvaceæ, having a flat membranaceous bright-green frond. U. latissima and U. Lactuca are sometimes eaten. See green laver (under laver), sea-lettuce (under lettuce), and Enteromorpha.
    • ***

Etymology

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
L., sedge

Usage

In literature:

To Ulva we came in the dark, and left it before noon the next day.
"A Journey to the Western Isles of Scotland" by Samuel Johnson
Arrive at Mr. M'Quarrie's in Ulva.
"Life Of Johnson, Volume 5" by Boswell
The family of David Livingstone sprang, as he has himself recorded, from the island of Ulva, on the west coast of Mull, in Argyllshire.
"The Personal Life Of David Livingstone" by William Garden Blaikie
This turf is green Ulva, and this is Gometra, and the shell is Little Colonsay.
"Audrey" by Mary Johnston
And what song will she sing now, that Ulva and Colonsay may awake and fancy that some mermaiden is singing to bewail her lost lover?
"Macleod of Dare" by William Black
Are they of the class of the ulvae, confervae, or fuci?
"The King's Own" by Captain Frederick Marryat
Maid of Ulva, the, by Delta, 645.
"Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine, Volume 61, No. 380, June, 1847" by Various
Ulva, or sea-lettuce, is to be found in abundance in all our small bays and inlets at low tide.
"Harper's Young People, August 17, 1880" by Various
ENTEROMORPHA, a genus of Green Algae, similar to Ulva, but with a tubular thallus.
"The New Gresham Encyclopedia" by Various
Poor Ulva's chief fear in life was a snake.
"The Diamond Fairy Book" by Various
***

In poetry:

Then his blow fell, and knocked Ulva's club from his hand,
While both armies in amazement stand
To watch the hand-to-hand fight,
While Shuac's warriors felt great delight.
"The Battle of Shina, in Africa, Fought in 1800" by William Topaz McGonagall
Then the two Kings met each other at last,
And fire flashed from their weapons, and blows fell fast;
But Shuac was the strongest of the two,
But King Ulva was his match with the club, Ulva knew.
"The Battle of Shina, in Africa, Fought in 1800" by William Topaz McGonagall
And bugles rang out their hoarse call,
And armed men gathered quickly, not in dread of their downfall;
For King Ulva resolved to go and meet Shuac,
So, by doing so, King Ulva's men courage didn't lack.
"The Battle of Shina, in Africa, Fought in 1800" by William Topaz McGonagall
Then the men of Mizra laid down their arms and fled
When they saw that their King was killed dead;
Then King Ulva said to the Scotchman, I am thy servant for ever,
For to thee I owe my life, and nought but death will us sever.
"The Battle of Shina, in Africa, Fought in 1800" by William Topaz McGonagall
Then, with his club, he gave Shuac a blow, which wounded him deep,
Crying out, Shuac, thy blood is deserting thee! thou art a sheep!
Cried Ulva, dealing him another fearful blow,
Then Shuac raised his club and rushed on his foe.
"The Battle of Shina, in Africa, Fought in 1800" by William Topaz McGonagall
When King Ulva heard the news, he told his warriors to prepare,
Then suddenly the clatter of arms sounded in the night air;
And the pale beams of the moon shone on coats of mail,
But not one bosom beneath them with fear did quail.
"The Battle of Shina, in Africa, Fought in 1800" by William Topaz McGonagall