Tringa

Definitions

  • WordNet 3.6
    • n Tringa a genus of Scolopacidae
    • ***
Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
    • n Tringa (Zoöl) A genus of limicoline birds including many species of sandpipers. See Dunlin Knot, and Sandpiper.
    • ***
Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
    • n tringa A genus of sandpipers, of the family Scolopacidæ It was formerly very comprehensive, embracing not only the sandpipers proper, but all the short-billed scolapacines, including most tattlers or Totaninæ. It is now restricted to such forms as the knot, T canutus, and a few closely related sandpipers, often distributed in several sections, as Arquatella, Ancylochilus, Pelidna, Actodromas, etc. See sandpiper (with cut), also cuts under dunlin and stint, A few of the four-toed plovers, as the squatarole, used also to be placed in Tringa.
    • n tringa [lowercase] A sandpiper, or some similar small wader.
    • ***
Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • n Tringa tring′gä a genus of sandpipers, of family Scolopacidæ—containing the knot, &c
    • ***

Etymology

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
NL

Usage

In literature:

KNOT, company, band; a sandpiper or robin snipe (Tringa canutus); flower-bed laid out in fanciful design.
"Volpone; Or, The Fox" by Ben Jonson
KNOT, company, band; a sandpiper or robin snipe (Tringa canutus); flower-bed laid out in fanciful design.
"The Alchemist" by Ben Jonson
KNOT, company, band; a sandpiper or robin snipe (Tringa canutus); flower-bed laid out in fanciful design.
"The Poetaster" by Ben Jonson
KNOT, company, band; a sandpiper or robin snipe (Tringa canutus); flower-bed laid out in fanciful design.
"Sejanus: His Fall" by Ben Jonson
KNOT, company, band; a sandpiper or robin snipe (Tringa canutus); flower-bed laid out in fanciful design.
"Every Man In His Humor" by Ben Jonson
There were two species of Laridae, neither of which I had seen before, several small Tringae, the very long red shanked bird, Hematopus?
"Journals of Travels in Assam, Burma, Bhootan, Afghanistan and TheNeighbouring Countries" by William Griffith
Linnaeus, in the Fauna Suecica, p. 64, calls it 'Tringa Lobata,' but afterwards 'Northern Tringa'; and his editor, Gmelin, 'Dark Tringa.
"Love's Meinie" by John Ruskin
N. Tringa ruficollis, Pall.
"In the Andamans and Nicobars" by C. Boden Kloss
TRINGA (Sandpiper, Knot, Dunlin, Stint).
"British Birds in their Haunts" by Rev. C. A. Johns
Tringa acuminata pectoralis, ii.
"Argentine Ornithology, Volume I (of 2)" by P. L. Sclater
It is extremely active, always preferring wet grounds to dry, and runs rapidly over the mud in search of food like a Tringa.
"Argentine Ornithology, Volume II (of 2)" by P. L. Sclater
***