Torricellian

Definitions

  • Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
    • a Torricellian Of or pertaining to Torricelli, an Italian philosopher and mathematician, who, in 1643, discovered that the rise of a liquid in a tube, as in the barometer, is due to atmospheric pressure. See Barometer.
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Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
    • torricellian Pertaining to Evangelista Torricelli, an Italian physicist and mathematician (1608–47), who, in 1643, discovered the principle on which the barometer is constructed, by means of an experiment called from him the Torricellian experiment. This experiment consisted in filling with mercury a glass tube closed at one end and then inverting it; the open end was then brought under the surface of mercury in a vessel, when the column of mercury in the tube was observed to descend till it stood at a height equal to about 30 inches above the level of the mercury in the vessel, leaving a vacuum at the top, between the upper extremity of the column and that of the tube. This experiment led to the discovery that the column of mercury in the tube is supported by the pressure of the atmosphere acting on the surface of the mercury in the vessel, and that this column is an exact counterbalance to the atmospheric pressure. See barometer.
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Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • adj Torricellian tor-i-sel′i-an or tor-i-chēl′i-an pertaining to the Italian mathematician Evangelista Torricelli (1608-47), who discovered in 1643 the principle on which the barometer is constructed
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Usage

In literature:

This vacuum is generally known as the TORRICELLIAN VACUUM, after the name of its discoverer.
"The Mastery of the Air" by William J. Claxton
Being 30 inches long up to the bottom of the expanded portion, or lamp globe, the mercury fell below this and left a Torricellian vacuum there.
"Scientific American Supplement, No. 344, August 5, 1882" by Various
I went to the Philosophic Club, where was examined the Torricellian experiment.
"The World's Greatest Books, Vol IX." by Edited by Arthur Mee and J.A. Hammerton
The column sank, but it ceased to sink at a height of thirty inches, leaving the Torricellian vacuum over-head.
"Fragments of science, V. 1-2" by John Tyndall
Torricelli in the space at the top of his barometer (pressure-gauge) had produced what is called a Torricellian vacuum.
"An Introduction to the History of Science" by Walter Libby
I went to the Philosophic Club, where was examined the Torricellian experiment.
"The Diary of John Evelyn (Vol 1 of 2)" by John Evelyn
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