To smoke the pipe of peace

Definitions

  • Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
    • To smoke the pipe of peace to smoke from the same pipe in token of amity or preparatory to making a treaty of peace, -- a custom of the American Indians.
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Usage

In literature:

Even by day they hung about, smoking the pipe of peace, and looking almost as if they wanted tit-bits to eat.
"Peter Pan" by James M. Barrie
We have smoked the pipe of peace; so let us go back to our wigwams and bury the feud.
"A Modern Cinderella" by Louisa May Alcott
The Frenchmen were at first in danger of being killed, as the Sious refused to smoke with them the pipe of peace.
"Pioneers in Canada" by Sir Harry Johnston
He had come to see the Great Father, and to see if the peace-pipe could not be smoked on the big waters of the Potomac.
"Three Years on the Plains" by Edmund B. Tuttle
We love Frenchmen, and wish to smoke with them the pipe of peace.
"The Adventures of the Chevalier De La Salle and His Companions, in Their Explorations of the Prairies, Forests, Lakes, and Rivers, of the New World, and Their Interviews with the Savage Tribes, Two Hundred Years Ago" by John S. C. Abbott
In this the Indians smoked tobacco, passing the pipe from one to another in token of peace and friendship.
"Journeys Through Bookland, Vol. 8" by Charles H. Sylvester
While other Indians were promising to bury the hatchet, Pontiac, the soul of the conspiracy, made no promises and smoked no peace-pipe.
"Four American Indians" by Edson L. Whitney
Even by day they hung about, smoking the pipe of peace, and looking almost as if they wanted tit-bits to eat.
"Peter and Wendy" by James Matthew Barrie
He held a council with them, smoked the pipe of peace, and endeavored to explain to them his mission.
"Lewis and Clark" by William R. Lighton
He told them that he had ordered him to visit the Ottigamies, his dutiful children, and smoke with them the pipe of peace.
"The History of Sandford and Merton" by Thomas Day
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