Targum

Definitions

  • Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
    • n Targum A translation or paraphrase of some portion of the Old Testament Scriptures in the Chaldee or Aramaic language or dialect.
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Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
    • n Targum A translation or paraphrase of some portion of the Hebrew Scriptures in the Aramaic or Chaldee language or dialect, which became necessary after the Babylonish captivity, when Hebrew began to die out as the popular language. The Targum, long preserved by oral transmission, does not seem to have been committed to writing until the first centuries of the Christian era. The most ancient and valuable of the extant Targums are those ascribed to or called after Onkelos (on the Pentateuch) and Jonathan Ben Uzziel. The Targums do not furnish any paraphrase of Nehemiah, Ezra, or Daniel.
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Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • n Targum tār′gum a general term for the Aramaic versions—often paraphrases—of the Old Testament, which became necessary when, after and perhaps during the Babylonian Exile, Hebrew began to die out as the popular language and was supplanted by Aramaic
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Etymology

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
Chald. targūm, interpretation, fr. targēm, to interpret. Cf. Truchman, and Dragoman
Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
Assyr. ragâmu, to speak, whence targumânu, speaker.

Usage

In literature:

The Targum of Jonathan Ben Uzziel bears about the same date.
"The Anti-Slavery Examiner, Part 1 of 4" by American Anti-Slavery Society
The Targum of Jonathan Ben Uzziel bears about the same date.
"The Anti-Slavery Examiner, Omnibus" by American Anti-Slavery Society
Of old the Targum, or Aramaic version, had been read in public worship together with the original Hebrew.
"Chapters on Jewish Literature" by Israel Abrahams
The Targum I began to think .
"The Pocket George Borrow" by George Borrow
Targum of Jonathan and also the Yerushalmi record the same fantastic tradition.
"Hebraic Literature; Translations from the Talmud, Midrashim and Kabbala" by Various
Jonathan used both his predecessors' paraphrases; the author of the Jerusalem Targum that of Onkelos alone.
"Companion to the Bible" by E. P. Barrows
I have opened the book, and each star is the initial letter of each line of the Targum that I have now read to you.
"Alroy The Prince Of The Captivity" by Benjamin Disraeli
I weighed it with the Chaldee Targum and the Septuaginta.
"Early Theories of Translation" by Flora Ross Amos
The Targum of Jonathan substitutes Rabbis, or Scribes, for the word 'prophets' where it occurs.
"Jesus the Christ" by James Edward Talmage
In the same year that saw the publication of "Targum," he returned home.
"George Borrow in East Anglia" by William A. Dutt
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In news:

Rutgers University students are no longer living in the Somerset-Bridgewater Crowne Plaza Hotel, said Joan Carbone, executive director of residence life, according to a report in the Daily Targum.
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